Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req) - SGI

This is a discussion on Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req) - SGI ; The following header lines retained to effect attribution: >Date: Tue, 07 Oct 2003 23:09:58 +0000 (GMT) >From: wave++ >Subject: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req) >To: info-iris-misc@ARL.ARMY.MIL >Proud being counter-tendency, I'd like to optimize certain algorithms to >death on ...

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Thread: Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req)

  1. Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req)

    The following header lines retained to effect attribution:
    >Date: Tue, 07 Oct 2003 23:09:58 +0000 (GMT)
    >From: wave++
    >Subject: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req)
    >To: info-iris-misc@ARL.ARMY.MIL


    >Proud being counter-tendency, I'd like to optimize certain algorithms to
    >death on my octane (>= R10K). I'd like to hear from you about any good
    >documentation pointers about assembly programming on IRIX and MIPS in
    >general that discusses a bit more about the general development guideline
    >(assembly, linking steps, how GOT works in a relocatable objects..) than
    >how SGI's TPL does.


    >I do accept pointers to TPL itself. SGI's TPL is amazing and _really_
    >full of docs, so finding the needed one is difficult. Anyway TPL docs
    >are generally specific, and I do need instead a bit more context (how to
    >glue things toghether).


    >I did not found any printed book about MIPS (programming, CPU design),
    >neither on IRIX. Any good book about assembly programming on unix that's
    >worth mentioning then?


    >wave++ (also known, in some places, as "Yuri D'Elia") http://www.yuv.info/
    >The email address is fake (thanks swen)! You know how to contact me anyway.


    Since about the 1970's, compilers operating at extreme optimization
    almost always generate better code than almost all programmers can
    write because computers can track more details more accurately than
    humans. IBM did extensive studies on the topic. I imagine that
    you could locate some of the papers using a web search. The primary
    use of assembly language today is low frequency of coding operations which
    are machine specific such as receiving machine interrupts and packaging
    the interrupts as kernel structures for further processing.

    Randolph J. Herber, herber@fnal.gov, +1 630 840 2966, CD/CDFTF PK-149F,
    Mail Stop 318, Fermilab, Kirk & Pine Rds., PO Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510-0500,
    USA. (Speaking for myself and not for US, US DOE, FNAL nor URA.) (Product,
    trade, or service marks herein belong to their respective owners.)

  2. Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req)

    In article ,
    Randolph J. Herber wrote:
    :Since about the 1970's, compilers operating at extreme optimization
    :almost always generate better code than almost all programmers can
    :write because computers can track more details more accurately than
    :humans. IBM did extensive studies on the topic.

    Fortran 77 compilers, sure, but C compilers can still blow optimization
    badly because they have to assume that any two external pointers might
    be aliased.
    --
    I don't know if there's destiny,
    but there's a decision! -- Wim Wenders (WoD)

  3. Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req)

    In article ,
    roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote:

    : In article ,
    : Randolph J. Herber wrote:
    : :Since about the 1970's, compilers operating at extreme optimization
    : :almost always generate better code than almost all programmers can
    : :write because computers can track more details more accurately than
    : :humans. IBM did extensive studies on the topic.
    :
    : Fortran 77 compilers, sure, but C compilers can still blow optimization
    : badly because they have to assume that any two external pointers might
    : be aliased.

    C99 introduced new aliasing rules that help with that. Thankfully aliasing is
    fairly rare, so I don't think it'll be missed.


    Cheers - Tony 'Nicoya' Mantler

    --
    Tony 'Nicoya' Mantler -- Master of Code-fu -- nicoya@ubb.ca
    -- http://nicoya.feline.pp.se/ -- http://www.ubb.ca/ --

  4. Re: assembly programming on mips (doc pointers req)

    "Randolph J. Herber" writes:

    > Since about the 1970's, compilers operating at extreme optimization
    > almost always generate better code than almost all programmers can
    > write because computers can track more details more accurately than
    > humans. IBM did extensive studies on the topic. I imagine that
    > you could locate some of the papers using a web search. The primary
    > use of assembly language today is low frequency of coding operations which
    > are machine specific such as receiving machine interrupts and packaging
    > the interrupts as kernel structures for further processing.


    However, having at least rudimentary knowledge about the assembly on
    the platform of your choice can be pretty useful, particularly
    when debugging. Even more so when debugging binaries compiled at
    extreme levels of optimization.

    *p

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