Disk Clone - SGI

This is a discussion on Disk Clone - SGI ; I have a disk which has the OS 6.5.29. and another disk with OS 6.5.24. I need the former one to be cloned by the later one. [OS 6.5.24] ------>[OS 6.5.29] Please let me know the steps in detail...

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Thread: Disk Clone

  1. Disk Clone

    I have a disk which has the OS 6.5.29. and another disk with OS 6.5.24.
    I need the former one to be cloned by the later one.
    [OS 6.5.24] ------>[OS 6.5.29]

    Please let me know the steps in detail


  2. Re: Disk Clone

    sachu wrote:
    > I have a disk which has the OS 6.5.29. and another disk with OS 6.5.24.
    > I need the former one to be cloned by the later one.
    > [OS 6.5.24] ------>[OS 6.5.29]
    >
    > Please let me know the steps in detail


    Here you are (ever herad of the SGI Infosearch pack on your machine?):

    > Creating a New System Disk by Cloning
    >
    > This procedure describes how to turn an option disk into an exact copy of a system disk. Use this procedure when you want to set up two or more systems with identical system disks. The systems must have identical processor and graphics types.
    > Caution: The procedure in this section destroys all data on the option disk. If the option disk contains files that you want to save, back up all files on the option disk to tape or another disk before beginning this procedure.
    >
    > You must perform this procedure as superuser. To ensure that the system disk that you create is identical to the original system disk, the system should be in single user mode.
    >
    > 1.
    >
    > List the disk partitioning of the system (root) disk by invoking prtvtoc without parameters, for example:
    >
    > # prtvtoc
    > Printing label for root disk
    >
    > * /dev/root (bootfile “/unix”)
    > * 512 bytes/sector
    > Partition Type Fs Start: sec Size: sec Mount Directory
    > 0 xfs yes 4096 4138249
    > 1 raw 4142345 262144
    > 8 volhdr 0 4096
    > 10 volume 0 4404489
    >
    >
    > 2.
    >
    > List the disk partitioning of the option disk that is to be the clone, for example:
    >
    > # prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/dks0d2vh
    > ...
    > Partition Type Fs Start: sec Size: sec Mount Directory
    > 0 efs 3024 50652
    > 1 raw 53676 81648
    > 6 efs 135324 1925532
    > 8 volhdr 0 3024
    > 10 volume 0 2060856
    >
    >
    > 3.
    >
    > Compare the disk partitioning of the two disks. They must have the same layout for the root and (if used) the usr partition. If they are not the same, repartition the option disk to match the system disk using the procedure in “Repartitioning a Disk With fx”.
    > 4.
    >
    > Use the procedure in “Adding Files to the Volume Header With dvhtool” to check the contents of the volume header of the option disk and add programs, if necessary, by copying them from the system disk.
    > 5.
    >
    > Make a new filesystem on the root partition of the option disk. For example, to make an XFS root filesystem with a 4 KB block size and a 1000 block internal log (the default values), give this command:
    >
    > # mkfs /dev/dsk/dks0d2s0
    >
    > For additional instructions on making an XFS filesystem, see “Planning an XFS Filesystem” in Chapter 6 and “Making an XFS Filesystem” in Chapter 6. There is no need to mount the filesystem after making it.
    > 6.
    >
    > If there is a separate usr partition, make a new filesystem on the usr partition of the option disk, for example:
    >
    > # mkfs /dev/dsk/dks0d2s6
    >
    >
    > 7.
    >
    > Create a temporary mount point for the option disk filesystems, for example:
    >
    > # mkdir /clone
    >
    >
    > 8.
    >
    > Mount the root filesystem of the option disk and change directories to the mount point, for example:
    >
    > # mount /dev/dsk/dks0d2s0 /clone
    > # cd /clone
    >
    >
    > 9.
    >
    > Use dump (for EFS filesystems) or xfsdump (for XFS filesystems) to copy the root filesystem on the system disk to the root filesystem of the option disk. The dump command is:
    >
    > # dump 0f - / | restore xf -
    >
    > The xfsdump command is:
    >
    > # xfsdump -l 0 - / | xfsrestore - .
    >
    >
    > 10.
    >
    > If the disks do not have a usr partition, skip to step 13.
    > 11.
    >
    > In preparation for copying the usr filesystem, mount the usr filesystem instead of the root filesystem:
    >
    > # cd ..
    > # umount /clone
    > # mount /dev/dsk/dks0d2s6 /clone
    > # cd /clone
    >
    >
    > 12.
    >
    > Use dump (for EFS filesystems) or xfsdump (for XFS filesystems) to copy the usr filesystem on the system disk to the usr filesystem of the option disk. The dump command is:
    >
    > # dump 0f - /usr | restore xf -
    >
    > The xfsdump command is:
    >
    > # xfsdump -l 0 - /usr | xfsrestore - .
    >
    >
    > 13.
    >
    > Unmount the filesystem mounted at the temporary mount point and remove the mount point, for example:
    >
    > # cd ..
    > # umount /clone
    > # rmdir /clone
    >
    > The option disk is now an exact copy of the system disk. It can be moved to a system with the same hardware configuration.
    >


  3. Re: Disk Clone


    Walther Mathieu wrote:
    > sachu wrote:
    > > I have a disk which has the OS 6.5.29. and another disk with OS 6.5.24.
    > > I need the former one to be cloned by the later one.
    > > [OS 6.5.24] ------>[OS 6.5.29]
    > >
    > > Please let me know the steps in detail

    >
    > Here you are (ever herad of the SGI Infosearch pack on your machine?):
    >
    > > Creating a New System Disk by Cloning
    > >
    > > This procedure describes how to turn an option disk into an exact copy of a system disk. Use this procedure when you want to set up two or more systems with identical system disks. The systems must have identical processor and graphics types.
    > > Caution: The procedure in this section destroys all data on the option disk. If the option disk contains files that you want to save, back up all files on the option disk to tape or another disk before beginning this procedure.
    > >
    > > You must perform this procedure as superuser. To ensure that the system disk that you create is identical to the original system disk, the system should be in single user mode.
    > >
    > > 1.
    > >
    > > List the disk partitioning of the system (root) disk by invoking prtvtoc without parameters, for example:
    > >
    > > # prtvtoc
    > > Printing label for root disk
    > >
    > > * /dev/root (bootfile "/unix")
    > > * 512 bytes/sector
    > > Partition Type Fs Start: sec Size: sec Mount Directory
    > > 0 xfs yes 4096 4138249
    > > 1 raw 4142345 262144
    > > 8 volhdr 0 4096
    > > 10 volume 0 4404489
    > >
    > >
    > > 2.
    > >
    > > List the disk partitioning of the option disk that is to be the clone, for example:
    > >
    > > # prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/dks0d2vh
    > > ...
    > > Partition Type Fs Start: sec Size: sec Mount Directory
    > > 0 efs 3024 50652
    > > 1 raw 53676 81648
    > > 6 efs 135324 1925532
    > > 8 volhdr 0 3024
    > > 10 volume 0 2060856
    > >
    > >
    > > 3.
    > >
    > > Compare the disk partitioning of the two disks. They must have the same layout for the root and (if used) the usr partition. If they are not the same, repartition the option disk to match the system disk using the procedure in "Repartitioning a Disk With fx".
    > > 4.
    > >
    > > Use the procedure in "Adding Files to the Volume Header With dvhtool" to check the contents of the volume header of the option disk and add programs, if necessary, by copying them from the system disk.
    > > 5.
    > >
    > > Make a new filesystem on the root partition of the option disk. For example, to make an XFS root filesystem with a 4 KB block size and a 1000 block internal log (the default values), give this command:
    > >
    > > # mkfs /dev/dsk/dks0d2s0
    > >
    > > For additional instructions on making an XFS filesystem, see "Planning an XFS Filesystem" in Chapter 6 and "Making an XFS Filesystem" in Chapter 6. There is no need to mount the filesystem after making it.
    > > 6.
    > >
    > > If there is a separate usr partition, make a new filesystem on the usr partition of the option disk, for example:
    > >
    > > # mkfs /dev/dsk/dks0d2s6
    > >
    > >
    > > 7.
    > >
    > > Create a temporary mount point for the option disk filesystems, for example:
    > >
    > > # mkdir /clone
    > >
    > >
    > > 8.
    > >
    > > Mount the root filesystem of the option disk and change directories to the mount point, for example:
    > >
    > > # mount /dev/dsk/dks0d2s0 /clone
    > > # cd /clone
    > >
    > >
    > > 9.
    > >
    > > Use dump (for EFS filesystems) or xfsdump (for XFS filesystems) to copy the root filesystem on the system disk to the root filesystem of the option disk. The dump command is:
    > >
    > > # dump 0f - / | restore xf -
    > >
    > > The xfsdump command is:
    > >
    > > # xfsdump -l 0 - / | xfsrestore - .
    > >
    > >
    > > 10.
    > >
    > > If the disks do not have a usr partition, skip to step 13.
    > > 11.
    > >
    > > In preparation for copying the usr filesystem, mount the usr filesystem instead of the root filesystem:
    > >
    > > # cd ..
    > > # umount /clone
    > > # mount /dev/dsk/dks0d2s6 /clone
    > > # cd /clone
    > >
    > >
    > > 12.
    > >
    > > Use dump (for EFS filesystems) or xfsdump (for XFS filesystems) to copy the usr filesystem on the system disk to the usr filesystem of the option disk. The dump command is:
    > >
    > > # dump 0f - /usr | restore xf -
    > >
    > > The xfsdump command is:
    > >
    > > # xfsdump -l 0 - /usr | xfsrestore - .
    > >
    > >
    > > 13.
    > >
    > > Unmount the filesystem mounted at the temporary mount point and remove the mount point, for example:
    > >
    > > # cd ..
    > > # umount /clone
    > > # rmdir /clone
    > >
    > > The option disk is now an exact copy of the system disk. It can be moved to a system with the same hardware configuration.
    > >



    Thanks Walther Mathieu


  4. Re: Disk Clone

    Walther Mathieu schrieb:
    > sachu wrote:
    >> I have a disk which has the OS 6.5.29. and another disk with OS 6.5.24.
    >> I need the former one to be cloned by the later one.
    >> [OS 6.5.24] ------>[OS 6.5.29]
    >>
    >> Please let me know the steps in detail

    >
    > Here you are (ever herad of the SGI Infosearch pack on your machine?):
    >
    >> Creating a New System Disk by Cloning

    .....

    Most time the disks have different sizes so i would preferer another method.

    http://www.futuretech.blinkenlights....les.html#CLONE

    regards
    Joerg

    --
    TakeNet GmbH http://www.takenet.de
    97080 Wuerzburg Tel: +49 931 903-2243
    Alfred-Nobel-Straße 20 Fax: +49 931 903-3025

  5. Re: Disk Clone

    Joerg Behrens wrote:
    >
    > Most time the disks have different sizes so i would preferer another
    > method.
    >
    > http://www.futuretech.blinkenlights....les.html#CLONE
    >

    The disks need not be the same size, only of similar partition layout.

    Walther

  6. Re: Disk Clone

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: RIPEMD160

    sachu wrote:
    > I have a disk which has the OS 6.5.29. and another disk with OS 6.5.24.
    > I need the former one to be cloned by the later one.
    > [OS 6.5.24] ------>[OS 6.5.29]
    >
    > Please let me know the steps in detail
    >


    I posted a simple guide for this on my site not too long ago. Let me
    know if it helps - it works for me!

    http://www.procyonlabs.com/guides/SG...mage/index.php


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    IT Security R&D and Consulting
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    Physical: DC / Baltimore
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