basic NFS/NIS help requested - SGI

This is a discussion on basic NFS/NIS help requested - SGI ; I would like to set up one (Indigo2) of a network of three computers to be a file server for the other two, and I would like to mount the users' home directories on the server. What I am not ...

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Thread: basic NFS/NIS help requested

  1. basic NFS/NIS help requested

    I would like to set up one (Indigo2) of a network of three computers to
    be a file server for the other two, and I would like to mount the
    users' home directories on the server.

    What I am not clear about is how to take an existing user of one of the
    client machines (Octane), and add that user to the server, and migrate
    his home directory to the server.

    If I understand adding a new user to the network, you create the user on
    the server and then essentially copy the user info to the clients. Can I
    do the reverse? Copy the user's line from /etc/passwd on the client
    machine to the server machine (assuming there is no conflicting user ID
    number).

    Once the user's account is set up on the server, can I then copy the
    existing home directory from the client machine to the server, following
    the procedure outlined in the "Storing Home Directories on a Second
    Disk" section of Chapter 6 in the "Personal System Administration
    Guide"? So that when the /usr/people/whoever directory is mounted from
    the server its contents are the same as they were (at the time of
    copying) on the client machine.

    Have checked through the documents and can't find a description of how
    to do this...thanks very much for any help, instructions, or pointers,

    RB
    --


  2. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    rb wrote in message news:...
    > I would like to set up one (Indigo2) of a network of three computers to
    > be a file server for the other two, and I would like to mount the
    > users' home directories on the server.
    >
    > What I am not clear about is how to take an existing user of one of the
    > client machines (Octane), and add that user to the server, and migrate
    > his home directory to the server.
    >
    > If I understand adding a new user to the network, you create the user on
    > the server and then essentially copy the user info to the clients. Can I
    > do the reverse? Copy the user's line from /etc/passwd on the client
    > machine to the server machine (assuming there is no conflicting user ID
    > number).
    >
    > Once the user's account is set up on the server, can I then copy the
    > existing home directory from the client machine to the server, following
    > the procedure outlined in the "Storing Home Directories on a Second
    > Disk" section of Chapter 6 in the "Personal System Administration
    > Guide"? So that when the /usr/people/whoever directory is mounted from
    > the server its contents are the same as they were (at the time of
    > copying) on the client machine.
    >
    > Have checked through the documents and can't find a description of how
    > to do this...thanks very much for any help, instructions, or pointers,


    You can copy the single line from the passwd file from the client machines
    to the server machine as long as user names/id's don't conflict. This
    will work all the same unless you change a password on one machine it will
    only be changed on that one machine and not the others. If you want to
    change it "for all the machine logins" you'd need to run NIS. But that's
    a little overkill for just 3 machines, so what you are doing will work fine.

    So. Copy your user directories over to your server and put them where
    you please. Such as /usr/people/username or some other directory.

    then you will need to export your file system you want to NFS mount
    to the other systems. Edit /etc/exports and add a line for your file
    system or directory to export. You can have more than one line if you
    want to export more than one thing, like a file system from a 2nd disk.

    examples:
    /usr/people
    /usr/disk2
    /home

    After editing the file you need to run the exportfs command.
    exportfs -a

    On your client machine you can mount this in an existing directory
    or a new directory (your choice). Make a directory (such as /home)
    if needed to mount NFS filesystem to.

    mkdir /home

    To manually mount the filesystem at the prompt use this command
    mount servername:/home /home

    To make this automatic so it mounts at boot time, add it to
    your /etc/fstab file.

    example
    servername:/home /home nfs rw 0 0



    I think this should help you.

    -mike





    > RB
    > --


  3. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    mike_sutton_nospam@yahoo.com (Michael Sutton) writes:

    > rb wrote in message news:
    >> I would like to set up one (Indigo2) of a network of three computers to
    >> be a file server for the other two, and I would like to mount the
    >> users' home directories on the server.


    [...]

    > You can copy the single line from the passwd file from the client machines
    > to the server machine as long as user names/id's don't conflict. This
    > will work all the same unless you change a password on one machine it will
    > only be changed on that one machine and not the others. If you want to
    > change it "for all the machine logins" you'd need to run NIS. But that's
    > a little overkill for just 3 machines, so what you are doing will work
    > fine.


    Thank you Mike, just what I was looking for

    RB
    --

  4. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    I'm trying to set up NIS at the moment. I've never touched NIS but have a
    shed load of new and remanufactured SGI kit here. I need to get NIS
    working on all my unix systems. Erm.....where do I start..... I have my
    /etc/passwd and /etc/shadow files on my linux server but the passwords are
    MD5 encrypted. Is this compatable?

    *********************
    Khalid Schofield
    System Administrator / EM Technician
    Dept. Of Materials
    University Of Oxford
    Parks Road
    Oxford
    OX1 3PH

    Email: khalid.schofield@materials.ox.ac.uk
    Tel: 01865 273785
    Fax: 01865 283333
    Web: http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/peo...eld/index.html


    On Tue, 27 Jan 2004, rb wrote:

    > mike_sutton_nospam@yahoo.com (Michael Sutton) writes:
    >
    > > rb wrote in message news:
    > >> I would like to set up one (Indigo2) of a network of three computers to
    > >> be a file server for the other two, and I would like to mount the
    > >> users' home directories on the server.

    >
    > [...]
    >
    > > You can copy the single line from the passwd file from the client machines
    > > to the server machine as long as user names/id's don't conflict. This
    > > will work all the same unless you change a password on one machine it will
    > > only be changed on that one machine and not the others. If you want to
    > > change it "for all the machine logins" you'd need to run NIS. But that's
    > > a little overkill for just 3 machines, so what you are doing will work
    > > fine.

    >
    > Thank you Mike, just what I was looking for
    >
    > RB
    > --
    >


  5. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    HI,

    Khalid Schofield wrote:
    > I'm trying to set up NIS at the moment. I've never touched NIS but have a
    > shed load of new and remanufactured SGI kit here. I need to get NIS
    > working on all my unix systems.
    > Erm.....where do I start

    Start by getting a Sparc box as nis master (they invented NIS, old name
    is YP but that was trademarked buy a UK company hence NIS ) ), forget
    Linux as NIS server due to very bad NFS system.

    Try http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/

    ...... I have my
    > /etc/passwd and /etc/shadow files on my linux server but the passwords are
    > MD5 encrypted. Is this compatable?

    Nope, you need to change decryption to standard Unix, you could try
    yppasswd on Linux to get it working!

    And dot forget the 2:nd best thing of NIS, have the filesystems
    automounted via maps, so you for example don't have to see /home/user1
    and when that filesystem is full you put the new user user99 under
    /home2/user99 which is often seen on poor admin Unix sites.

    They you can put all projects in a proj map under /proj or whatever and
    just make a new entry to the NIS DB and voila all machines have access
    to the filesystem no matter on what server the disk might be.

    /michael

  6. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    Michael Laajanen writes:

    > Khalid Schofield wrote:
    > > I'm trying to set up NIS at the moment. I've never touched NIS but have a
    > > shed load of new and remanufactured SGI kit here. I need to get NIS
    > > working on all my unix systems.
    > > Erm.....where do I start

    > Start by getting a Sparc box as nis master (they invented NIS, old
    > name is YP but that was trademarked buy a UK company hence NIS ) ),
    > forget Linux as NIS server due to very bad NFS system.
    >
    > Try http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/
    >
    > ..... I have my
    > > /etc/passwd and /etc/shadow files on my linux server but the passwords are
    > > MD5 encrypted. Is this compatable?

    > Nope, you need to change decryption to standard Unix, you could try
    > yppasswd on Linux to get it working!
    >
    > And dot forget the 2:nd best thing of NIS, have the filesystems
    > automounted via maps, so you for example don't have to see /home/user1
    > and when that filesystem is full you put the new user user99 under
    > /home2/user99 which is often seen on poor admin Unix sites.
    >
    > They you can put all projects in a proj map under /proj or whatever
    > and just make a new entry to the NIS DB and voila all machines have
    > access to the filesystem no matter on what server the disk might be.


    While NIS can be very convenient, it should perhaps be noted, that NIS
    is a security nightmare: NIS totally relies on the integrity of all
    hosts accessing the network. There is no encryption besides the
    crypted passwords and no good way to prevent users from retrieving all
    crypted network passwords, which are quite vulnerable to dictionary
    attacks.

    IMHO NIS may be nice but LDAP/SSL is certainly a superior replacement
    in most respects. I think there is even a howto for IRIX LDAP client
    setup.

    Thomas Jahns
    --
    "Computers are good at following instructions,
    but not at reading your mind."
    D. E. Knuth, The TeXbook, Addison-Wesley 1984, 1986, 1996, p. 9

  7. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    HI,
    Thomas Jahns wrote:
    > Michael Laajanen writes:
    >
    >
    >>Khalid Schofield wrote:



    > While NIS can be very convenient, it should perhaps be noted, that NIS
    > is a security nightmare: NIS totally relies on the integrity of all
    > hosts accessing the network. There is no encryption besides the
    > crypted passwords and no good way to prevent users from retrieving all
    > crypted network passwords, which are quite vulnerable to dictionary
    > attacks.

    Very much true, but if you trust the local network it's fine IMHO.
    >
    > IMHO NIS may be nice but LDAP/SSL is certainly a superior replacement
    > in most respects. I think there is even a howto for IRIX LDAP client
    > setup.
    >


    LDAP should not be a problem but since this thread started by "rb"
    and the following issue I think LDAP will be a nightmare compared NIS
    even considering any security issues don't you think )

    >I would like to set up one (Indigo2) of a network of three computers to
    >be a file server for the other two, and I would like to mount the
    >users' home directories on the server.


    cheers

    Michael

  8. Re: basic NFS/NIS help requested

    Michael Laajanen writes:
    > LDAP should not be a problem but since this thread started by "rb"
    > and the following issue I think LDAP will be a nightmare compared NIS
    > even considering any security issues don't you think )


    You are probably right, but as people tend to continually use what
    they are familiar with, I thought a little reminder of NIS' problems
    was in order. I know a few networks that are insecure because of the
    use of NIS (typical NFS setups don't make intrusion really hard also).

    Thomas Jahns
    --
    "Computers are good at following instructions,
    but not at reading your mind."
    D. E. Knuth, The TeXbook, Addison-Wesley 1984, 1986, 1996, p. 9

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