Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor? - Setup

This is a discussion on Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor? - Setup ; On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote: > Chris Mattern wrote: >> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But >> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an >> airplane as ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 170

Thread: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

  1. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:

    > Chris Mattern wrote:
    >> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>

    > I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    > sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    > running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    > server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    > I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    > to hijack me, good luck.
    > Bill Baka


    So?

    Assuming you are on broadband, there is traffic on your node.
    Probably some kid down the road with a Quake server.




    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  2. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Sebastian G. wrote:
    > The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Sebastian G.
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Wed, 05 Mar 2008 18:46:40 +0100
    >> <6384laF26l55mU1@mid.dfncis.de>:
    >>> Bill Baka wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>> They do it because they can.
    >>>>> They don't do it because they can't.
    >>>> Do you ever get out??
    >>>> Just because you personally haven't gotten harassed by the
    >>>> government doesn't mean they aren't watching you.
    >>>
    >>> No. You were claiming that they're accessing people's computers
    >>> at the time, by an included backdoor. And that's obviously nonsense.

    >>
    >> Not as obvious as one might think.

    >
    >
    > None of the things you mentioned gives any evidence that such a thing is
    > happening.


    Like they would leave evidence?
    >
    > > I'd have to look to see how BitTorrent works but my understanding is

    > that
    > > a daemon uses surplus bandwidth, for example.

    >
    > Which is an obvious instance of the reasons why one shouldn't use
    > untrusted software. The BitTorrent client from Bram Cohen became
    > untrustworthy when he decided to cooperate with the media mafia.
    >
    >
    >

    So far I haven't used BitTorrent, just Ktorrent and utorrent.
    I'm starting to play with Azureus but haven't downloaded anything with
    it yet.
    I have all the music I could ever want or listen to so I don't download
    MP3 files, only the odd something I may want to check out.
    As to the bandwidth, Ktorrent sucks up all it can get and it really
    messes up my mail and news, and even my browser (Firefox).

    Never underestimate the government. Who do you think hires the best and
    brightest?
    Bill Baka

  3. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Hadron wrote:
    > Bill Baka writes:
    >
    >> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>

    >> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >> to hijack me, good luck.
    >> Bill Baka
    >>

    >
    > Lovely. The old a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing once
    > more.
    >
    > "any internet stuff running". LOL.


    Clean slate, just the desktop.
    Bill Baka

  4. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    > On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >
    >> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>

    >> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >> to hijack me, good luck.
    >> Bill Baka

    >
    > So?
    >
    > Assuming you are on broadband, there is traffic on your node.
    > Probably some kid down the road with a Quake server.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    Bill Baka

  5. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 22:25:39 +0100, Hadron wrote:

    > Bill Baka writes:
    >
    >> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>

    >> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >> to hijack me, good luck.
    >> Bill Baka
    >>

    >
    > Lovely. The old a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing once
    > more.
    >
    > "any internet stuff running". LOL.


    It's traffic on his node.....

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  6. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Bill Baka wrote:


    >> None of the things you mentioned gives any evidence that such a thing is
    >> happening.

    >
    > Like they would leave evidence?



    You claimed that they're accessing people's computers, and you presented
    many things that were perfectly possible and most likely done without
    accessing your computer at all.

    So unless you can present any evidence, there's no reason why these things
    should be assumed to be related to any computer intrusion whatsoever.

    > So far I haven't used BitTorrent, just Ktorrent and utorrent.



    uTorrent has been bought by Cohen's company, so any versions released after
    this date should be considered as compromised.

    > Never underestimate the government. Who do you think hires the best and
    > brightest?


    Can you present any better than dumb brabbling?

  7. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 21:38:52 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:

    > Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >>
    >>> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>>
    >>> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >>> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >>> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >>> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >>> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >>> to hijack me, good luck.
    >>> Bill Baka

    >>
    >> So?
    >>
    >> Assuming you are on broadband, there is traffic on your node.
    >> Probably some kid down the road with a Quake server.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    > is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    > I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    > NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    > probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    > system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    > Bill Baka


    So run Ethereal or some other packet sniffer on it and see what's going on.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  8. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Moshe Goldfarb writes:

    > On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 21:38:52 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >
    >> Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>>>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>>>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>>>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>>>
    >>>> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >>>> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >>>> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >>>> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >>>> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >>>> to hijack me, good luck.
    >>>> Bill Baka
    >>>
    >>> So?
    >>>
    >>> Assuming you are on broadband, there is traffic on your node.
    >>> Probably some kid down the road with a Quake server.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    >> is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    >> I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    >> NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    >> probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    >> system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    >> Bill Baka

    >
    > So run Ethereal or some other packet sniffer on it and see what's
    > going on.


    Wireshark is a wonder.

  9. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Bill Baka wrote:


    > I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    > NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    > probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    > system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.



    Maybe you're just too stupid to understand ARP and PPPoE?

  10. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 23:19:15 +0100, Hadron wrote:

    > Moshe Goldfarb writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 21:38:52 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >>
    >>> Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >>>> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>>>>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>>>>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>>>>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >>>>> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >>>>> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >>>>> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >>>>> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >>>>> to hijack me, good luck.
    >>>>> Bill Baka
    >>>>
    >>>> So?
    >>>>
    >>>> Assuming you are on broadband, there is traffic on your node.
    >>>> Probably some kid down the road with a Quake server.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    >>> is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    >>> I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    >>> NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    >>> probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    >>> system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    >>> Bill Baka

    >>
    >> So run Ethereal or some other packet sniffer on it and see what's
    >> going on.

    >
    > Wireshark is a wonder.


    Cool!
    Never heard of it but I'll take a look.

    I'm not really into these things, but I';; admit when I first got broadband
    the blinking lite on the cable modem did have me a little concerned.

    Now days the answer is in just about all the broadband companies FAQ.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  11. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Sebastian G.

    wrote
    on Wed, 05 Mar 2008 21:46:26 +0100
    <638f6cF26fso2U1@mid.dfncis.de>:
    > The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Sebastian G.
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Wed, 05 Mar 2008 18:46:40 +0100
    >> <6384laF26l55mU1@mid.dfncis.de>:
    >>> Bill Baka wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>> They do it because they can.
    >>>>> They don't do it because they can't.
    >>>> Do you ever get out??
    >>>> Just because you personally haven't gotten harassed by the government
    >>>> doesn't mean they aren't watching you.
    >>>
    >>> No. You were claiming that they're accessing people's computers
    >>> at the time, by an included backdoor. And that's obviously nonsense.

    >>
    >> Not as obvious as one might think.

    >
    >
    > None of the things you mentioned gives any evidence that such a thing is
    > happening.


    Wasn't me in any event. ;-) And I don't use BitTorrent anyway.

    >
    > > I'd have to look to see how BitTorrent works but my understanding is that
    > > a daemon uses surplus bandwidth, for example.

    >
    > Which is an obvious instance of the reasons why one
    > shouldn't use untrusted software.


    Agreed. Of course not everyone is competent to vet software.

    > The BitTorrent client from Bram Cohen became untrustworthy
    > when he decided to cooperate with the media mafia.
    >


    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Linux. Because life's too short for a buggy OS.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  12. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Bill Baka

    wrote
    on Wed, 05 Mar 2008 21:38:52 GMT
    :
    > Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 20:56:40 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >>
    >>> Chris Mattern wrote:
    >>>> Whether or not Linux is a kernel can be slippery, yes. But
    >>>> it's not a protocol, period. That's like describing an
    >>>> airplane as being a flight plan.
    >>>>
    >>> I do know that stuff is happening since my router's Internet light
    >>> sometimes gets all 'blinky' when I don't have any Internet stuff
    >>> running. It almost never gets to my hard drive since I also use a 3Com
    >>> server grade card with it's own junk blocking.
    >>> I don't keep anything financial on my computer so if anyone is looking
    >>> to hijack me, good luck.
    >>> Bill Baka

    >>
    >> So?
    >>
    >> Assuming you are on broadband, there is traffic on your node.
    >> Probably some kid down the road with a Quake server.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    > is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    > I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    > NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    > probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    > system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    > Bill Baka


    In my setup it wouldn't get past my NAT router. (This is a
    little box Earthlink gives me as a part of my DSL service.
    Dunno what other ISPs do in that area, although cable
    providers might have NAT as part of their stuff.)

    In fact, Wireshark, Etherial, EtherApe, or good old Tcpdump
    would see nothing unless I open the right NAT port.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Linux makes one use one's mind.
    Windows just messes with one's head.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  13. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Sebastian G. wrote:
    > Bill Baka wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> None of the things you mentioned gives any evidence that such a thing
    >>> is happening.

    >>
    >> Like they would leave evidence?

    >
    >
    > You claimed that they're accessing people's computers, and you presented
    > many things that were perfectly possible and most likely done without
    > accessing your computer at all.
    >
    > So unless you can present any evidence, there's no reason why these
    > things should be assumed to be related to any computer intrusion
    > whatsoever.


    I don't think it is anybody trying to hack in. The Internet light blinks
    even when the computer is off so I think it is the router pinging to
    keep alive.
    >
    >> So far I haven't used BitTorrent, just Ktorrent and utorrent.

    >
    >
    > uTorrent has been bought by Cohen's company, so any versions released
    > after this date should be considered as compromised.


    Damn. There are only about 6 torrent programs and utorrent did work good
    under XP.
    >
    >> Never underestimate the government. Who do you think hires the best
    >> and brightest?

    >
    > Can you present any better than dumb brabbling?


    You should know that the dumb ones go to the DMV or some place where
    they can piss off the most people.
    The CIA, DHS, FBI, DEA, ATF, etc., do go after the bestest, most squeaky
    cleanest, 4.0 GPA types. You can't go after the high level professional
    hackers and crooks with a bunch of dipsticks at the keyboards.
    Bill Baka

  14. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Sebastian G. wrote:
    > Bill Baka wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    >> NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    >> probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on
    >> the system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.

    >
    >
    > Maybe you're just too stupid to understand ARP and PPPoE?


    Stupid does not apply here.
    Lack of motivation does apply.
    I am now past 30 years of computer use.
    In 1978 I took home a 300 baud acoustic terminal and dialed into the
    mainframe at work to play Star Trek against the computer.
    Bill Baka

  15. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Bill Baka
    >
    > wrote
    >> The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    >> is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    >> I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    >> NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    >> probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    >> system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    >> Bill Baka

    >
    > In my setup it wouldn't get past my NAT router. (This is a
    > little box Earthlink gives me as a part of my DSL service.
    > Dunno what other ISPs do in that area, although cable
    > providers might have NAT as part of their stuff.)
    >
    > In fact, Wireshark, Etherial, EtherApe, or good old Tcpdump
    > would see nothing unless I open the right NAT port.
    >

    I have a Linksys WRT54G router, hardware version 6.0.
    I am looking for a WRT54GL since the L means Linux and this model has
    plenty of room for me to write my own rules.
    They actually built a router for the Linux community.
    Play time coming soon.
    Bill Baka

  16. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Hadron wrote:
    > Moshe Goldfarb writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 21:38:52 GMT, Bill Baka wrote:
    >>
    >>> The Internet light blinks all the time, day and night, but I think that
    >>> is just a 'keep alive' ping.
    >>> I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the server
    >>> NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is busy that
    >>> probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just anybody on the
    >>> system that responds. It doesn't get into my computer, AFAIK.
    >>> Bill Baka

    >> So run Ethereal or some other packet sniffer on it and see what's
    >> going on.

    >
    > Wireshark is a wonder.


    Right now I have logging set to the max and haven't found anything.
    I'll try Ethereal and Wireshark and maybe solve the mystery.
    Thanks for that.
    Bill Baka

  17. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 16:19:16 -0800 (PST), plenty900@yahoo.com wrote:

    >I've learned that there are bits of NSA's SELinux in various
    >places in kernel 2.6. How can I be sure that Big Brother isn't
    >using back doors or bugs to break into my computer?
    >Especially with all the illegal spying done these days...
    >How much safer would it be to just switch back to 2.4 or 2.5?


    Read the ****ing source code! Thousands of others have and there
    are no backdoors. When you build a kernel, it is from the source
    code and if the source code has no backdoors, then the compiled
    kernel won't either.

  18. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Bill Baka writes:

    > Sebastian G. wrote:
    >> Bill Baka wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I was talking about my Ethernet light to my computer where the
    >>> server NIC should block even more junk. If my Ethernet light is
    >>> busy that probably means someone is trying to hack me or maybe just
    >>> anybody on the system that responds. It doesn't get into my
    >>> computer, AFAIK.

    >>
    >>
    >> Maybe you're just too stupid to understand ARP and PPPoE?

    >
    > Stupid does not apply here.
    > Lack of motivation does apply.
    > I am now past 30 years of computer use.
    > In 1978 I took home a 300 baud acoustic terminal and dialed into the
    > mainframe at work to play Star Trek against the computer.
    > Bill Baka


    Yes. very good. But how thats supposed to help you understand modern HW
    and networking protocols is anybodies guess. My grandad had gas lighting
    - but he can't wire a plug.

  19. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    AZ Nomad writes:

    > On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 16:19:16 -0800 (PST), plenty900@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    >>I've learned that there are bits of NSA's SELinux in various
    >>places in kernel 2.6. How can I be sure that Big Brother isn't
    >>using back doors or bugs to break into my computer?
    >>Especially with all the illegal spying done these days...
    >>How much safer would it be to just switch back to 2.4 or 2.5?

    >
    > Read the ****ing source code! Thousands of others have and there
    > are no backdoors. When you build a kernel, it is from the source
    > code and if the source code has no backdoors, then the compiled
    > kernel won't either.


    Assuming you read the code to each and every application which runs
    under root. Assuming you have read the code for the compiler.

    COLA seems to hold some of the brightest C gurus in the whole world!

  20. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Mar 5, 10:54*am, Bill Baka wrote:
    > plenty...@yahoo.com wrote:
    > >> It might be more complicated than this. They are said to have back doors in
    > >> *standard protocols* (Linux included) [1,2,3,4] and these are hard to get by
    > >> unless you are a security professional (I'm not). What about hardware-based
    > >> hacks [5] (in which case "Intel" might be just an abbreviation)? Remember that
    > >> they just need to sniff packets and then decrypt successfully in order to gain
    > >> remote access.

    >
    > > Finally a mature response. I was beginning to think I was dealing with
    > > 11-year-olds.

    >
    > If you don't think the NSA (or anybody else) gets into your computer,
    > how about this, my experience so far. I used a torrent engine to
    > download 'Dreamgirls' for my daughter. What I got was a crappy copy and
    > a nasty e-mail from the MPAA police.
    > About 30 years ago I got a visit from 2 FBI gorillas in $1,000 suits
    > knocking on my door (at home, 8:00 P.M.) for a very minor infraction of
    > FCC regulations, and they gave me a pink ticket and a warning that if I
    > dot another warning it would be a RED ticket. The RED ticket is one step
    > from having you license pulled for a year.
    > If you don't think the FBI monitors your activities just write something
    > that says "A$$a$$inate p-r-e-s-i-d-e-n-t 'WEED'" in it and wait for the
    > FBI at your door.
    > I'm not paranoid, I have been hassled over trivial stuff.
    > A few years back, like 2004 (I think) I was detained by both DHS and FBI
    > agents on duty at Beale A.F.B. for riding my bike on a PUBLIC road and
    > taking a few pictures with me 1.2 M Pixel fixed focus el-cheapo camera.
    > Even after proving I was born here, 3rd generation, they held me for a
    > local Sheriff to pick me up and take me straight home with the bike
    > loosely in his trunk.
    > They do it because they can.
    > Bill Baka


    You're obviously a bad seed.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast