Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines - Setup

This is a discussion on Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines - Setup ; Hello, I am slightly familiar with how to implement cron (well...I have a man page on how to set it up) but wanted some help regarding how to setup a cron job on my Red Hat server at home to ...

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Thread: Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

  1. Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

    Hello, I am slightly familiar with how to implement cron (well...I
    have a man page on how to set it up) but wanted some help regarding
    how to setup a cron job on my Red Hat server at home to back up files
    that are on two of my Mac Laptops running OSX. Considering that Mac
    OSX has a Linux foundation I know this can be done. However the
    complicated part is that the laptops are not connected via ethernet to
    the Linux server, but rather wireless through a router.

    Not looking at something complicated, just a simple cron job to back
    up the documents folder on my macs.

    Thanks for the help!
    Starr


  2. Re: Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

    starr.corbin@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hello, I am slightly familiar with how to implement cron (well...I
    > have a man page on how to set it up) but wanted some help regarding
    > how to setup a cron job on my Red Hat server at home to back up files
    > that are on two of my Mac Laptops running OSX. Considering that Mac
    > OSX has a Linux foundation


    Free BSD actually., Quite different. And a lot of extras on top.


    > I know this can be done. However the
    > complicated part is that the laptops are not connected via ethernet to
    > the Linux server, but rather wireless through a router.
    >


    Makes no difference.

    > Not looking at something complicated, just a simple cron job to back
    > up the documents folder on my macs.
    >


    Mmm. The cron part s easy enough, Use terminal and set up a crontab entry

    see man crontab from terminal command line -

    The more difficult bit is actually writing a bash script..it will depend
    on what sort of services your server is running.

    Or did you want to suck data off the macs rather than push it onto the
    redhat?

    If thats your game, best is to let the macs export the home dirs via SMB
    shares, and get the redhat to mount the home dirs and tar them up into a
    backup place.

    You will have to leave the macs awake tho. MM. And maybe set them on
    fixed IP addresses in the 'home' location..


    Steps are broadly like this.

    1/. Disable sleep stuff. Set macs to 'home' location on fixed IP addresses.
    2/. Set macs up to 'share' home dirs.
    3/. start script development: you need to use smbclient to mount the
    macs. I forget the syntax.
    4/ Once mounted use tar and Gzip to create archives of te munted volumes.
    5/. Once that all works, make up a (root?) crontab entry and let it rip.






    > Thanks for the help!
    > Starr
    >


  3. Re: Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

    The Natural Philosopher wrote:


    >
    > Mmm. The cron part s easy enough, Use terminal and set up a crontab entry


    >
    > Steps are broadly like this.
    >
    > 1/. Disable sleep stuff. Set macs to 'home' location on fixed IP
    > addresses. 2/. Set macs up to 'share' home dirs.
    > 3/. start script development: you need to use smbclient to mount the
    > macs. I forget the syntax.


    Does OS X support ftp>

    > 4/ Once mounted use tar and Gzip to create archives of te munted volumes.
    > 5/. Once that all works, make up a (root?) crontab entry and let it rip.


    rsync would be another option. Perhaps set up one machine as an rsync
    server or let rsync connect using ssh to save on setting up nfs exports /
    shares?

    Pete

    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk

  4. Re: Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

    Peter Chant wrote:
    > The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Mmm. The cron part s easy enough, Use terminal and set up a crontab entry

    >
    >> Steps are broadly like this.
    >>
    >> 1/. Disable sleep stuff. Set macs to 'home' location on fixed IP
    >> addresses. 2/. Set macs up to 'share' home dirs.
    >> 3/. start script development: you need to use smbclient to mount the
    >> macs. I forget the syntax.

    >
    > Does OS X support ftp>


    Yup. If you turn it on..
    >
    >> 4/ Once mounted use tar and Gzip to create archives of te munted volumes.
    >> 5/. Once that all works, make up a (root?) crontab entry and let it rip.

    >
    > rsync would be another option. Perhaps set up one machine as an rsync
    > server or let rsync connect using ssh to save on setting up nfs exports /
    > shares?
    >


    Not sure it supports that..what dos rsync run over?

    > Pete
    >


  5. Re: Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

    On Aug 10, 4:03 am, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    > Peter Chant wrote:
    > > The Natural Philosopher wrote:

    >
    > >> Mmm. The cron part s easy enough, Use terminal and set up a crontab entry

    >
    > >> Steps are broadly like this.

    >
    > >> 1/. Disable sleep stuff. Set macs to 'home' location on fixed IP
    > >> addresses. 2/. Set macs up to 'share' home dirs.
    > >> 3/. start script development: you need to use smbclient to mount the
    > >> macs. I forget the syntax.

    >
    > > Does OS X support ftp>

    >
    > Yup. If you turn it on..
    >
    >
    >
    > >> 4/ Once mounted use tar and Gzip to create archives of te munted volumes.
    > >> 5/. Once that all works, make up a (root?) crontab entry and let it rip.

    >
    > > rsync would be another option. Perhaps set up one machine as an rsync
    > > server or let rsync connect using ssh to save on setting up nfs exports /
    > > shares?

    >
    > Not sure it supports that..what dos rsync run over?
    >
    > > Pete


    Thank you all for your suggestions!!!


  6. Re: Cron Job for Macs/Linux machines

    On 10 Aug, 01:23, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    > starr.cor...@gmail.com wrote:
    > > Hello, I am slightly familiar with how to implement cron (well...I
    > > have a man page on how to set it up) but wanted some help regarding
    > > how to setup a cron job on my Red Hat server at home to back up files
    > > that are on two of my Mac Laptops running OSX. Considering that Mac
    > > OSX has a Linux foundation

    >
    > Free BSD actually., Quite different. And a lot of extras on top.
    >
    > > I know this can be done. However the
    > > complicated part is that the laptops are not connected via ethernet to
    > > the Linux server, but rather wireless through a router.

    >
    > Makes no difference.
    >
    > > Not looking at something complicated, just a simple cron job to back
    > > up the documents folder on my macs.

    >
    > Mmm. The cron part s easy enough, Use terminal and set up a crontab entry
    >
    > see man crontab from terminal command line -
    >
    > The more difficult bit is actually writing a bash script..it will depend
    > on what sort of services your server is running.
    >
    > Or did you want to suck data off the macs rather than push it onto the
    > redhat?
    >
    > If thats your game, best is to let the macs export the home dirs via SMB
    > shares, and get the redhat to mount the home dirs and tar them up into a
    > backup place.
    >
    > You will have to leave the macs awake tho. MM. And maybe set them on
    > fixed IP addresses in the 'home' location..
    >
    > Steps are broadly like this.
    >
    > 1/. Disable sleep stuff. Set macs to 'home' location on fixed IP addresses.
    > 2/. Set macs up to 'share' home dirs.
    > 3/. start script development: you need to use smbclient to mount the
    > macs. I forget the syntax.
    > 4/ Once mounted use tar and Gzip to create archives of te munted volumes.
    > 5/. Once that all works, make up a (root?) crontab entry and let it rip.


    No. No, no, no, no no. SMB, or CIFS cannot hope to preserve many of
    the file types and ownership subtleties of a full backup.

    Rsync annd rsync over SSH is a good approach, possibly coupled with
    the rsnapshot tool. There are good ways to do this, depending on
    whether you have a push or a pull environment, and how often you need
    full backups.


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