usb disk insists on being readonly - Setup

This is a discussion on usb disk insists on being readonly - Setup ; Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk. My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it. My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with about 400Mbytes of disk and the ...

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  1. usb disk insists on being readonly

    Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    disk is connected through a hub.

    The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    assumes you're on Windows.

    When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    fstab entry that appears is

    /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    total 8
    dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    Information
    if I try 'touch a' it says
    touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    I cd back to /media
    $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system

    Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Bill


  2. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    oops - I meant my computer has about 400MB of ram, not disk.



  3. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:

    > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.
    >
    > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.
    >
    > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    > disk is connected through a hub.
    >
    > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    > assumes you're on Windows.
    >
    > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    > fstab entry that appears is
    >
    > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >
    > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    > total 8
    > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    > Information
    > if I try 'touch a' it says
    > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > I cd back to /media
    > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    >
    > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > Bill

    My guess: the drive is formatted ntfs and the "auto" in the fstab entry
    is causing linux to load the ntfs driver (rather than ntfs-3g). The
    drive will be painfully slow at usb 1.1. usb2 pci cards are cheap and
    do a great job.

  4. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:
    > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.
    >
    > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.
    >
    > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    > disk is connected through a hub.
    >
    > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    > assumes you're on Windows.
    >
    > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    > fstab entry that appears is
    >
    > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >
    > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    > total 8
    > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    > Information
    > if I try 'touch a' it says
    > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > I cd back to /media
    > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    >
    > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.


    What kind of filesystem did you put on it when you formatted it?

    --
    Al Qaeda is growing so quickly that today everyone in Iraq who is fighting
    the US is a member of Al Qaeda.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3810
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    http://www.giwersworld.org

  5. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    On Jul 4, 6:05 pm, Roby wrote:
    > lalawawa wrote:
    > > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    >
    > > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    >
    > > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    > > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    > > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    > > disk is connected through a hub.

    >
    > > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    > > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    > > assumes you're on Windows.

    >
    > > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    > > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    > > fstab entry that appears is

    >
    > > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    >
    > > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    > > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    > > total 8
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    > > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    > > Information
    > > if I try 'touch a' it says
    > > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    > > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > > I cd back to /media
    > > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    > > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system

    >
    > > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    > > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    > > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    >
    > > Any help would be appreciated.

    >
    > > Bill

    >
    > My guess: the drive is formatted ntfs and the "auto" in the fstab entry
    > is causing linux to load the ntfs driver (rather than ntfs-3g). The
    > drive will be painfully slow at usb 1.1. usb2 pci cards are cheap and
    > do a great job.


    OK, how do I fix the fstab entry to make it RW?


  6. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    On Jul 4, 5:53 pm, Matt Giwer wrote:
    > lalawawa wrote:
    > > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    >
    > > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    >
    > > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    > > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    > > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    > > disk is connected through a hub.

    >
    > > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    > > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    > > assumes you're on Windows.

    >
    > > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    > > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    > > fstab entry that appears is

    >
    > > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    >
    > > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    > > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    > > total 8
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    > > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    > > Information
    > > if I try 'touch a' it says
    > > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    > > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > > I cd back to /media
    > > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    > > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system

    >
    > > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    > > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    > > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    >
    > > Any help would be appreciated.

    >
    > What kind of filesystem did you put on it when you formatted it?
    >
    > --
    > Al Qaeda is growing so quickly that today everyone in Iraq who is fighting
    > the US is a member of Al Qaeda.
    > -- The Iron Webmaster, 3810
    > nizkorhttp://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    > http://www.giwersworld.org


    I did not format the drive. I just bought it, brought it home,
    plugged it into the USB hub and turned it on.
    How would I go about formatting the drive? I would want the drive to
    be also readable if I hook it up to a windows machine.


  7. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    On Jul 4, 6:05 pm, Roby wrote:
    > lalawawa wrote:
    > > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    >
    > > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    >
    > > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    > > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    > > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    > > disk is connected through a hub.

    >
    > > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    > > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    > > assumes you're on Windows.

    >
    > > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    > > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    > > fstab entry that appears is

    >
    > > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    >
    > > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    > > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    > > total 8
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    > > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    > > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    > > Information
    > > if I try 'touch a' it says
    > > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    > > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > > I cd back to /media
    > > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    > > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system

    >
    > > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    > > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    > > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    >
    > > Any help would be appreciated.

    >
    > > Bill

    >
    > My guess: the drive is formatted ntfs and the "auto" in the fstab entry
    > is causing linux to load the ntfs driver (rather than ntfs-3g). The
    > drive will be painfully slow at usb 1.1. usb2 pci cards are cheap and
    > do a great job.


    I would like to put in a USB 2.0 board, but I absolutely, positively
    don't want to make any hardware changes to my box until I'm able to
    back up.

    In the past, I would back up on CD-ROM using K3B. Then suddenly,
    probably as a result of an upgrade, neither K3B nor the CD-ROM Creator
    software are able to find my CD burner. Here's my fstab:

    $ cat /etc/fstab
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    #
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root / ext3
    defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    /dev/hda1 /boot ext3 defaults 0 2
    /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-swap_1 none swap sw
    0 0
    /dev/hdc /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    /dev/hdd /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    $
    $ df
    Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root
    37079744 12680436 22515764 37% /
    tmpfs 193436 0 193436 0% /dev/shm
    tmpfs 193436 12588 180848 7% /lib/modules/
    2.6.12-10-386/volatile
    /dev/hda1 233335 19153 201734 9% /boot
    /dev/sda1 390708800 77912 390630888 1% /media/
    simpletech
    $

    but I don't think upgrading to a 2.0 port is going to change the
    permissions of the disk. I think all that would be accomplished by
    upgrading to USB 2.0 would be to change my slow 400GB readonly disk
    with nothing on it to a fast 400GB disk with nothing on it.


  8. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:
    > On Jul 4, 5:53 pm, Matt Giwer wrote:
    >> lalawawa wrote:
    >>> Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.
    >>> My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.
    >>> My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    >>> about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    >>> say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    >>> disk is connected through a hub.
    >>> The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    >>> clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    >>> assumes you're on Windows.
    >>> When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    >>> filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    >>> fstab entry that appears is
    >>> /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >>> If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    >>> dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    >>> if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    >>> total 8
    >>> dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    >>> drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    >>> dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    >>> Information
    >>> if I try 'touch a' it says
    >>> touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    >>> if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    >>> touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    >>> I cd back to /media
    >>> $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    >>> chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    >>> $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    >>> chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    >>> Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    >>> says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    >>> 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.
    >>> Any help would be appreciated.

    >> What kind of filesystem did you put on it when you formatted it?


    > I did not format the drive. I just bought it, brought it home,
    > plugged it into the USB hub and turned it on.
    > How would I go about formatting the drive? I would want the drive to
    > be also readable if I hook it up to a windows machine.


    If you did not format it the best you might have is a Windows file system so it
    can advertise plug-n-play. If it has no filesystem then you obviously cannot
    write to it.

    What I believe to be a complete description is here.
    http://www.giwersworld.org/computers...b-drives.phtml

    The general format command is this. It may be a place other than sbin on Ubuntu.

    /sbin/mke2fs -c -j -L 320 /dev/sdX1

    Read the article to figure out what X should be. It's easy.

    I want to make the article complete so let me know how it goes.

    If you want it readable by Windows you will have to create a windows file
    system on it with windows and set your fstab entry to mount it as vfat or
    whatever. I have not done that in so long I do not remember how to do it. If you
    just want primitive access google for a program something like lnxread.exe or
    lxread.exe which will copy a file from an ext2 or 3 partition to vfat.

    If it was advertised as plug-n-play it should have come with a Windows file
    system.

    --
    The only way to get to the bottom of the Valerie Plame outing is to torture
    Libby until he tells all. The identity of our spies is a matter of national
    security.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3813
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    Blame Israel http://www.ussliberty.org a10

  9. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:

    > On Jul 4, 6:05 pm, Roby wrote:
    >> lalawawa wrote:
    >> > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    >>
    >> > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    >>
    >> > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    >> > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    >> > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    >> > disk is connected through a hub.

    >>
    >> > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    >> > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    >> > assumes you're on Windows.

    >>
    >> > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    >> > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    >> > fstab entry that appears is

    >>
    >> > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    >>
    >> > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    >> > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    >> > total 8
    >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    >> > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    >> > Information
    >> > if I try 'touch a' it says
    >> > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    >> > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    >> > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    >> > I cd back to /media
    >> > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    >> > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    >> > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    >> > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system

    >>
    >> > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    >> > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    >> > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    >>
    >> > Any help would be appreciated.

    >>
    >> > Bill

    >>
    >> My guess: the drive is formatted ntfs and the "auto" in the fstab entry
    >> is causing linux to load the ntfs driver (rather than ntfs-3g). The
    >> drive will be painfully slow at usb 1.1. usb2 pci cards are cheap and
    >> do a great job.

    >
    > I would like to put in a USB 2.0 board, but I absolutely, positively
    > don't want to make any hardware changes to my box until I'm able to
    > back up.
    >
    > In the past, I would back up on CD-ROM using K3B. Then suddenly,
    > probably as a result of an upgrade, neither K3B nor the CD-ROM Creator
    > software are able to find my CD burner. Here's my fstab:
    >
    > $ cat /etc/fstab
    > # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    > #
    > #
    > proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root / ext3
    > defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    > /dev/hda1 /boot ext3 defaults 0 2
    > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-swap_1 none swap sw
    > 0 0
    > /dev/hdc /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    > /dev/hdd /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    > /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    > $
    > $ df
    > Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root
    > 37079744 12680436 22515764 37% /
    > tmpfs 193436 0 193436 0% /dev/shm
    > tmpfs 193436 12588 180848 7% /lib/modules/
    > 2.6.12-10-386/volatile
    > /dev/hda1 233335 19153 201734 9% /boot
    > /dev/sda1 390708800 77912 390630888 1% /media/
    > simpletech
    > $
    > but I don't think upgrading to a 2.0 port is going to change the
    > permissions of the disk. I think all that would be accomplished by
    > upgrading to USB 2.0 would be to change my slow 400GB readonly disk
    > with nothing on it to a fast 400GB disk with nothing on it.

    First let's confirm that your external drive is formatted ntfs:
    $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda

    Yes, it's ntfs. So try mounting it using the ntfs-3g driver:
    $ ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/usb0

    If successful, you finally have write privilege.

    If not, you need to install that driver. I don't use Ubuntu
    so don't know the details. Once installed, change fstab to:
    /dev/sda1 /media/usb0 ntfs-3g rw,user,noauto 0 0
    Note that it's sda1, not sda.

    I agree that a recent backup promotes sanity. Doing it at
    12megabits/sec will provide time to clean the garage, etc.
    It will make you appreciate usb2.0 later. You'll see.

    I reformatted my external drives to ext3. Better.

    Roby



  10. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    On Jul 5, 7:58 am, Roby wrote:
    > lalawawa wrote:
    > > On Jul 4, 6:05 pm, Roby wrote:
    > >> lalawawa wrote:
    > >> > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    >
    > >> > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    >
    > >> > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    > >> > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual doesn't
    > >> > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    > >> > disk is connected through a hub.

    >
    > >> > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    > >> > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    > >> > assumes you're on Windows.

    >
    > >> > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    > >> > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    > >> > fstab entry that appears is

    >
    > >> > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    >
    > >> > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    > >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    > >> > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    > >> > total 8
    > >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    > >> > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    > >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    > >> > Information
    > >> > if I try 'touch a' it says
    > >> > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > >> > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    > >> > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    > >> > I cd back to /media
    > >> > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > >> > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system
    > >> > $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    > >> > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file system

    >
    > >> > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    > >> > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    > >> > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    >
    > >> > Any help would be appreciated.

    >
    > >> > Bill

    >
    > >> My guess: the drive is formatted ntfs and the "auto" in the fstab entry
    > >> is causing linux to load the ntfs driver (rather than ntfs-3g). The
    > >> drive will be painfully slow at usb 1.1. usb2 pci cards are cheap and
    > >> do a great job.

    >
    > > I would like to put in a USB 2.0 board, but I absolutely, positively
    > > don't want to make any hardware changes to my box until I'm able to
    > > back up.

    >
    > > In the past, I would back up on CD-ROM using K3B. Then suddenly,
    > > probably as a result of an upgrade, neither K3B nor the CD-ROM Creator
    > > software are able to find my CD burner. Here's my fstab:

    >
    > > $ cat /etc/fstab
    > > # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    > > #
    > > #
    > > proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    > > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root / ext3
    > > defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    > > /dev/hda1 /boot ext3 defaults 0 2
    > > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-swap_1 none swap sw
    > > 0 0
    > > /dev/hdc /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    > > /dev/hdd /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    > > /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    > > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    > > $
    > > $ df
    > > Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    > > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root
    > > 37079744 12680436 22515764 37% /
    > > tmpfs 193436 0 193436 0% /dev/shm
    > > tmpfs 193436 12588 180848 7% /lib/modules/
    > > 2.6.12-10-386/volatile
    > > /dev/hda1 233335 19153 201734 9% /boot
    > > /dev/sda1 390708800 77912 390630888 1% /media/
    > > simpletech
    > > $
    > > but I don't think upgrading to a 2.0 port is going to change the
    > > permissions of the disk. I think all that would be accomplished by
    > > upgrading to USB 2.0 would be to change my slow 400GB readonly disk
    > > with nothing on it to a fast 400GB disk with nothing on it.

    >
    > First let's confirm that your external drive is formatted ntfs:
    > $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda
    >
    > Yes, it's ntfs. So try mounting it using the ntfs-3g driver:
    > $ ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/usb0
    >
    > If successful, you finally have write privilege.
    >
    > If not, you need to install that driver. I don't use Ubuntu
    > so don't know the details. Once installed, change fstab to:
    > /dev/sda1 /media/usb0 ntfs-3g rw,user,noauto 0 0
    > Note that it's sda1, not sda.
    >
    > I agree that a recent backup promotes sanity. Doing it at
    > 12megabits/sec will provide time to clean the garage, etc.
    > It will make you appreciate usb2.0 later. You'll see.
    >
    > I reformatted my external drives to ext3. Better.
    >
    > Roby


    There is no ntfs-3g program available, and I went to the Synaptic
    Package Manager (where you go on Ubuntu to download new packages) and
    there was no such package available for download.


  11. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    Note that according to fstab, the drive is /dev/sda. According to df
    and /etc/mtab, the drive is /dev/sda1.
    If I do umount /dev/sda1 it complains it's not in fstab. If I do
    umount /dev/sda, it complains it's not in mtab. I'm not sure how to
    deal with this if I am to format the disk.


  12. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:

    > On Jul 5, 7:58 am, Roby wrote:
    >> lalawawa wrote:
    >> > On Jul 4, 6:05 pm, Roby wrote:
    >> >> lalawawa wrote:
    >> >> > Hi, I just bought a 400Mbyte usb disk.

    >>
    >> >> > My OS is Ubuntu version 5, I've recently done the updates to it.

    >>
    >> >> > My computer is a Sony VAIO PCV-RX270DS that I bought in 2001, with
    >> >> > about 400Mbytes of disk and the usb port is USB 1 (that manual
    >> >> > doesn't
    >> >> > say which USB version because I think USB 2.0 wasn't out yet). The
    >> >> > disk is connected through a hub.

    >>
    >> >> > The drive is a 400GB Simpletech drive. The specifications make it
    >> >> > clear it's USB 1.1 compatible. All the online technical support
    >> >> > assumes you're on Windows.

    >>
    >> >> > When I turn on the disk, it appears in the /media directory by the
    >> >> > filename ' simpletech ' (not spaces before and after the name). The
    >> >> > fstab entry that appears is

    >>
    >> >> > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    >>
    >> >> > If I cd to /media and do 'ls -ld \ simpletech\ ', I get
    >> >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 simpletech
    >> >> > if I go into that directory and do 'ls -la' I get
    >> >> > total 8
    >> >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 4096 2007-02-20 10:25 .
    >> >> > drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2007-07-04 14:20 ..
    >> >> > dr-x------ 1 wulluw wulluw 0 2007-02-20 10:25 System Volume
    >> >> > Information
    >> >> > if I try 'touch a' it says
    >> >> > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    >> >> > if I try 'sudo touch a' it still says
    >> >> > touch: cannot touch `a': Read-only file system
    >> >> > I cd back to /media
    >> >> > $ chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    >> >> > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file
    >> >> > system $ sudo chmod +w \ simpletech\ /
    >> >> > chmod: changing permissions of ` simpletech /': Read-only file
    >> >> > system

    >>
    >> >> > Why is it saying the filesystem is readonly when /etc/fstab clearly
    >> >> > says it's rw? What do I have to do to get the disk mounted rw? A
    >> >> > 400GB readonly disk with nothing on it isn't very useful.

    >>
    >> >> > Any help would be appreciated.

    >>
    >> >> > Bill

    >>
    >> >> My guess: the drive is formatted ntfs and the "auto" in the fstab
    >> >> entry
    >> >> is causing linux to load the ntfs driver (rather than ntfs-3g). The
    >> >> drive will be painfully slow at usb 1.1. usb2 pci cards are cheap and
    >> >> do a great job.

    >>
    >> > I would like to put in a USB 2.0 board, but I absolutely, positively
    >> > don't want to make any hardware changes to my box until I'm able to
    >> > back up.

    >>
    >> > In the past, I would back up on CD-ROM using K3B. Then suddenly,
    >> > probably as a result of an upgrade, neither K3B nor the CD-ROM Creator
    >> > software are able to find my CD burner. Here's my fstab:

    >>
    >> > $ cat /etc/fstab
    >> > # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    >> > #
    >> > #
    >> > proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    >> > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root / ext3
    >> > defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    >> > /dev/hda1 /boot ext3 defaults 0 2
    >> > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-swap_1 none swap sw
    >> > 0 0
    >> > /dev/hdc /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    >> > /dev/hdd /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    >> > /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >> > /dev/sda /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >> > $
    >> > $ df
    >> > Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    >> > /dev/mapper/Ubuntu-root
    >> > 37079744 12680436 22515764 37% /
    >> > tmpfs 193436 0 193436 0% /dev/shm
    >> > tmpfs 193436 12588 180848 7% /lib/modules/
    >> > 2.6.12-10-386/volatile
    >> > /dev/hda1 233335 19153 201734 9% /boot
    >> > /dev/sda1 390708800 77912 390630888 1% /media/
    >> > simpletech
    >> > $
    >> > but I don't think upgrading to a 2.0 port is going to change the
    >> > permissions of the disk. I think all that would be accomplished by
    >> > upgrading to USB 2.0 would be to change my slow 400GB readonly disk
    >> > with nothing on it to a fast 400GB disk with nothing on it.

    >>
    >> First let's confirm that your external drive is formatted ntfs:
    >> $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda
    >>
    >> Yes, it's ntfs. So try mounting it using the ntfs-3g driver:
    >> $ ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/usb0
    >>
    >> If successful, you finally have write privilege.
    >>
    >> If not, you need to install that driver. I don't use Ubuntu
    >> so don't know the details. Once installed, change fstab to:
    >> /dev/sda1 /media/usb0 ntfs-3g rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >> Note that it's sda1, not sda.
    >>
    >> I agree that a recent backup promotes sanity. Doing it at
    >> 12megabits/sec will provide time to clean the garage, etc.
    >> It will make you appreciate usb2.0 later. You'll see.
    >>
    >> I reformatted my external drives to ext3. Better.
    >>
    >> Roby

    >
    > There is no ntfs-3g program available, and I went to the Synaptic
    > Package Manager (where you go on Ubuntu to download new packages) and
    > there was no such package available for download.

    .... mebbe your /etc/apt/sources.list needs an additional repository.

    Google search for Ubuntu ntfs-3g returneth many matches, including:
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mo...irdPartyNTFS3G

    I recall adding ntfs-3g to an XUbuntu install a while back, so it's
    available somewhere in UbuntuLand.


  13. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:

    > Note that according to fstab, the drive is /dev/sda. According to df
    > and /etc/mtab, the drive is /dev/sda1.
    > If I do umount /dev/sda1 it complains it's not in fstab. If I do
    > umount /dev/sda, it complains it's not in mtab. I'm not sure how to
    > deal with this if I am to format the disk.


    With the external disk not mounted, if you edit fstab to make the entry
    /dev/sda1, can't you $ mount /media/usb0 and then $ umount /media/usb0??

    /dev/sda refers to the whole disk thingy, including the partition table that
    usually lives at the very front of the disk.

    /dev/sda1 refers to the first (and probably only) partition on that disk,
    located after the partition table.

    Methinks the fstab entry should be /dev/sda1 ... unless SimpleTech chose
    to treat the whole disk like a giant-giant floppy and so there's no
    partition table. I think that's unlikely; may not even be possible.



  14. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    Roby wrote:
    > lalawawa wrote:
    >
    >> Note that according to fstab, the drive is /dev/sda. According to df
    >> and /etc/mtab, the drive is /dev/sda1.
    >> If I do umount /dev/sda1 it complains it's not in fstab. If I do
    >> umount /dev/sda, it complains it's not in mtab. I'm not sure how to
    >> deal with this if I am to format the disk.

    >
    > With the external disk not mounted, if you edit fstab to make the entry
    > /dev/sda1, can't you $ mount /media/usb0 and then $ umount /media/usb0??
    >
    > /dev/sda refers to the whole disk thingy, including the partition table that
    > usually lives at the very front of the disk.
    >
    > /dev/sda1 refers to the first (and probably only) partition on that disk,
    > located after the partition table.
    >
    > Methinks the fstab entry should be /dev/sda1 ... unless SimpleTech chose
    > to treat the whole disk like a giant-giant floppy and so there's no
    > partition table. I think that's unlikely; may not even be possible.
    >
    >

    Correct. Mounting the WHOLE DISK is a buit of a recipe fior disaster.
    You partition the raw device (sda) to give miuntable partitions
    (sda1,sda2 etc.), then format the *partitions*with a file system. And
    mount those.

    The only operations ever carried out on the raw device would be a dd
    total transfer of everything (including partition info) and repartitioning.

    Raw disks are almost NEVER mounted.

  15. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:
    > Note that according to fstab, the drive is /dev/sda. According to df
    > and /etc/mtab, the drive is /dev/sda1.
    > If I do umount /dev/sda1 it complains it's not in fstab. If I do
    > umount /dev/sda, it complains it's not in mtab. I'm not sure how to
    > deal with this if I am to format the disk.


    To format you do not want it mounted. If you try the format program will ask
    you if you are stupid. So just issue the command and see what happens.

    --
    Drug use is a vice. Stealing to pay for drugs is a crime. The cost of drugs
    is high because the vice is considered a crime. Is there any sense in this?
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3820
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    commentary http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/running.phtml a5
    flying saucers http://www.giwersworld.org/flyingsa.html a2

  16. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    OK guys, here's my plan.

    Formatting the device is not a very attractive option right now for
    two reasons:
    - I have two boxes, a windoze box as well as the Ubuntu box that I
    have been talking about. I am afraid that if I reformat, it will no
    longer be Windoze readable and I will no longer have the option of
    putting the drive on my windoze box and reading my backups from there.
    - as long as my usb port is 1.1, formatting a 400GB drive at 10MB /
    sec will take all day If it takes a few tries to get it right that
    will be a disaster.

    I only have < 1GB of data that needs backing up. I have a 1GB usb ram
    stick that works, I can do a backup to it in a couple minutes. So
    this gives me the option of doing risky changes to my machine.

    A few days ago, I ordered Ubuntu 7.0 from Amazon, it should show up
    any day now. Last night I went to Circuit City and they didn't have
    any USB 2.0 boards, so I just ordered one on the internet, it should
    show up in a few days. By backing up to my ram stick, I can make both
    those upgrades to my box. (I totally will not upgrade my OS without
    backing up first. I did a routine backup of SuSE about a year ago and
    it wound up screwing up my machine with complete loss of data. So I
    no longer am willing to upgrade my OS without backing up first).
    Then, since Bill Marcum told me I will have access to ntfs-3g,
    hopefully everything will work. If that doesn't solve the problem, I
    will then have the option of reformatting the drive at reasonably high
    speed.

    Bill


  17. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    Thank you all very much for your help. I wasn't expecting to get so
    much useful advice.


  18. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    OK, everybody, here's how things turned out.

    This whole saga started when I found my cdrom burning software
    could no longer find my cdrom device. I figured some random update to
    Ubuntu had given me software that no longer understood my hardware, so
    I bought this new disk to do my backups on.
    Then I had all these problems with this disk, leading to this
    thread in usenet.
    There was a hassle getting my Ubuntu 7 dvd in the mail, and things
    got busy, so I finally went to upgrade my Ubuntu from version 5 to 7
    last weekend. I discovered that my computer would not boot off the
    dvd. In fact, it could not access the dvd or cdrom at all. So the
    whole thing was a hardware problem.
    So then I contemplated getting an external usb cdrom/dvd drive,
    which could involve as many headaches as the simpletech usb disk drive
    did, and add a new board (which never showed up in the mail) to
    support USB 2.0 (since doing everything over the existing USB 1.1
    would be pretty painful), all to keep my 6 1/2 year old, 866 MHz, 400
    MB cpu going, or I could just go to the store and get a new computer.
    I chose the latter action.
    I got a Compaq Presario SR530SX, 1G Ram, 200G disk, Vista
    installed but no Vista recovery disk.
    I tested the hardware thoroughly before installing Ubuntu, since
    that action voided the store warranty.
    The Ubuntu dvd gave confusing directions when asking me how to
    partition the 200G disk. I thought I told it to put 80% of the disk
    in the Ubuntu partition and give the rest to the Vista partition, but
    it did the other way round. So I've only got 40G in the partition I
    actually use, but that will be enough.
    I plugged the new simpletech into my other computer, my Windoze
    box, and put a bunch of data on it, that went OK. I plugged the new
    device into my new Ubuntu box and had exactly the same problems I had
    on Ubuntu 5. Following Roby's advice, I got ntfs-3g installed.
    There was still a problem. The drive really, really wants to be
    mounted at '/media/ simpletech ' (note Unix-confounding spaces before
    and after 'simpletech'). If I put that name into /etc/fstab it
    doesn't know how to parse it. I tried putting '\' before the spaces
    in the fstab but that didn't help. I tried putting '/media/
    simpletech ' in single quotes and it REALLY didn't like that.
    I did eventually manage to manually mount the thing in a newly
    created directory /media/st that I created, but it just won't
    cooperate with going there when I tell it to in the fstab. Also,
    every time I reboot, the usb drive comes up wth a different /dev
    directory name. Failing to find the pattern, I wrote scripts based on
    "fdisk -l | grep NTFS" and sed that get the name of the appropriate
    wandering /dev drive and mount/umount it. That will do. I anticipate
    accessing this disk at most once per month for backup.

    I really don't recommend the simpletech drive to Linux users. I
    guess a lot of these problems are inevitable for any NTFS drive, and I
    want a Windoze compatible file system. But I think life would have
    been a lot easier if they hadn't programmed it to mount itself in a
    directory with SPACES in the filename.
    It's the second simpletech drive I got. Both have worked fine
    with Windoze.The first, a 160G drive, has been good, but the second,
    400G drive is noiser and hotter. You really have to mount it standing
    up so it can get rid of the excess heat, while the 160G model you can
    just lie down and put things on top of.

    One fortunate spinoff of all this hassle is I figured out how to
    use 'sudo ntfs-config' to mount my 160G Windoze partition from Linux,
    so I at least have easy access to all that disk. But the Ubuntu
    people would be well-advised to try to make their questions clearer
    when asking how you want your partitions set up.
    One bad thing about Linux is it gets very upset when you just yank
    the usb connection without umounting the drive. Windoze doesn't mind
    (well, AFAIK, Windoze has no way to umount the drive).

    Windoze Vista has been pretty underwhelming. When I was testing it
    out before installing Linux, one thing I did was mount both my usb
    drives on it and copy my 20G library of music mp3's from one to the
    other. At the same time I was playing some of the music from the
    source, not the destination, drive. When the copy got to the file I
    was playing, Vista died! Blue Screen of Death, no less. What an
    operating system - accessing the same file for read twice crashes it!
    After I installed Linux and was fooling around with ntfs-3g, I was
    getting messages from Linux about the new Simpletech drive being
    'dirty' and recommending I boot Windoze a couple of times with the
    drive attached. I did this, and one of those times, Vista went into a
    mode where it said "Don't shut down or unplug your computer,
    installing ...". It didn't say *what* it was installing, *I* hadn't
    asked it to install *anything*, it gave no time estimate of how long
    this would take, it just sat there saying that. I went out for the
    day, returning 7 hours later to be greeted by the same screen. At
    that point I powered down the PC and was able to reboot Vista OK.


  19. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    lalawawa wrote:
    (snip)

    > I did eventually manage to manually mount the thing in a newly
    > created directory /media/st that I created, but it just won't
    > cooperate with going there when I tell it to in the fstab. Also,
    > every time I reboot, the usb drive comes up wth a different /dev
    > directory name. Failing to find the pattern, I wrote scripts based on
    > "fdisk -l | grep NTFS" and sed that get the name of the appropriate
    > wandering /dev drive and mount/umount it. That will do. I anticipate
    > accessing this disk at most once per month for backup.
    >


    Put a disk label on the usb drive and use it to identify the right device by
    putting something like this in /etc/fstab:

    /dev/disk/by-label/my_usb_disk /media/st ntfs-3g defaults 0 0

    The label is case-sensitive.

    Methinks this was all just a ploy to get yourself Vista. Shame on you!!


  20. Re: usb disk insists on being readonly

    On Jul 28, 9:46 pm, Roby wrote:
    > lalawawa wrote:
    >
    > Put a disk label on the usb drive and use it to identify the right device by
    > putting something like this in /etc/fstab:
    >
    > /dev/disk/by-label/my_usb_disk /media/st ntfs-3g defaults 0 0
    >
    > The label is case-sensitive.


    OK, sounds great. How do I put a label on the disk?


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