Partitioning problem - Setup

This is a discussion on Partitioning problem - Setup ; I was trying to install Ubuntu as a dual boot on my PC. My main 80Gb HDD was partitioned already into C: (Windows system NTFS) and D: (Storage and files NTFS), both 40Gb each. I had cleared D: and told ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Partitioning problem

  1. Partitioning problem

    I was trying to install Ubuntu as a dual boot on my PC. My main 80Gb
    HDD was partitioned already into C: (Windows system NTFS) and D:
    (Storage and files NTFS), both 40Gb each. I had cleared D: and told
    Ubuntu to install there. However, during installation there was a
    problem and I had to abort. Second time round, Ubuntu refused to
    install onto the same drive.

    In the end, I successfully installed onto my back-up drive, which is
    only 10Gb, and I have no problem with this. However, I now want to re-
    partition my main 80Gb HDD, as the abortive Ubuntu installation has
    substantially reduced the size of the drive available.

    I do not have any Windows partitioning tools, but I have tried to use
    QTParted for this, which I have on a Knoppix Live DVD. As I am not
    sure what I am doing, I am steadily making it worse! I wondered if
    anyone on this group could tell me where I am going wrong.

    My current setup is:

    C: (under Windows) NTFS size 39.57Gb starting at 0.03Mb, ending at
    39.57Gb. This contains my Windows system.
    D: (under Windows) NTFS size 20.02Gb starting at 39.57Gb ending at
    59.60Gb.

    Partition 03 HDA-1 (Free) size 16.36Gb starting at 59.60Gb ending at
    75.96Gb
    Partition 04 HDA4 (Extended) size 745.2Mb starting at 75.96Gb ending
    at 76.69Gb
    Partition 05 HDA5 (Linux-swap) 745.17Mb starting at 75.96Gb ending at
    76.69Gb

    What I want on this disk drive is just C: (unchanged) and D: which can
    be either NTFS or FAT32 (I'm not bothered!), but to be one partition
    of 40Gb, same as C:

    I somehow need to remove the unwanted partitions and extend D: to be
    40Gb. But I cannot get QTParted to do it, and I am afraid to
    experiment too much in case I mess up the C:, which I wanted to keep.

    Can anyone help me?

    Thanks

    Steve Wylie
    Kent
    U.K.


  2. Re: Partitioning problem

    stevewy@hotmail.com wrote:

    > I was trying to install Ubuntu as a dual boot on my PC. My main 80Gb
    > HDD was partitioned already into C: (Windows system NTFS) and D:
    > (Storage and files NTFS), both 40Gb each. I had cleared D: and told
    > Ubuntu to install there. However, during installation there was a
    > problem and I had to abort. Second time round, Ubuntu refused to
    > install onto the same drive.
    >
    > In the end, I successfully installed onto my back-up drive, which is
    > only 10Gb, and I have no problem with this. However, I now want to re-
    > partition my main 80Gb HDD, as the abortive Ubuntu installation has
    > substantially reduced the size of the drive available.
    >
    > I do not have any Windows partitioning tools, but I have tried to use
    > QTParted for this, which I have on a Knoppix Live DVD. As I am not
    > sure what I am doing, I am steadily making it worse! I wondered if
    > anyone on this group could tell me where I am going wrong.
    >
    > My current setup is:
    >
    > C: (under Windows) NTFS size 39.57Gb starting at 0.03Mb, ending at
    > 39.57Gb. This contains my Windows system.
    > D: (under Windows) NTFS size 20.02Gb starting at 39.57Gb ending at
    > 59.60Gb.
    >
    > Partition 03 HDA-1 (Free) size 16.36Gb starting at 59.60Gb ending at
    > 75.96Gb
    > Partition 04 HDA4 (Extended) size 745.2Mb starting at 75.96Gb ending
    > at 76.69Gb
    > Partition 05 HDA5 (Linux-swap) 745.17Mb starting at 75.96Gb ending at
    > 76.69Gb
    >
    > What I want on this disk drive is just C: (unchanged) and D: which can
    > be either NTFS or FAT32 (I'm not bothered!), but to be one partition
    > of 40Gb, same as C:
    >
    > I somehow need to remove the unwanted partitions and extend D: to be
    > 40Gb. But I cannot get QTParted to do it, and I am afraid to
    > experiment too much in case I mess up the C:, which I wanted to keep.
    >
    > Can anyone help me?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Steve Wylie
    > Kent
    > U.K.

    Hi Steve!

    As I understand it, your drive setup is now like this:

    hda1 39.57gB ntfs windows o/s
    hda2 20.02gB ntfs windows data (empty)
    hda3 16.36gB unused formerly Ubuntu
    hda4 (extended)
    hda5 745.17mB swap

    Look in your (new) Ubuntu install. Does /etc/fstab
    show that /dev/hda5 as the swap partition? If so, you
    must decide whether to leave it that way or make a new
    swap partition on your 10gB drive so that hda5 can be
    recycled to its formaer (windows) role. I will assume
    hda5 is NOT needed by Ubuntu. Adjust as appropriate.

    Ubuntu has the tools you need to revise the partitioning
    on your 80gB drive - or the packages can be easily installed.

    My choice would be to use cfdisk to first delete hda2 and
    above, then create a new hda2 using all of the available
    space. Then boot windows and use it to format D:.

    gparted is a very slick gui that will also do what you need.
    I had a lot of trouble with qtparted too, but gparted works
    very well. It will allow you to perform the same operations
    I listed for cfdisk, or you may be brave and delete just hda3/4/5
    and then grow hda2 into the new free space.

    Make a backup of windows before fiddling with the partition
    table (and don't save it to your 80g drive!). Bad things
    sometimes happen... especially when there's no backup.

    Roby

  3. Re: Partitioning problem

    >>My choice would be to use cfdisk to first delete hda2 and
    above, then create a new hda2 using all of the available
    space.

    I have looked at /etc/fstab as you suggested, and my current working
    Ubuntu does not need any of the hda partitions, as it is installed
    entirely on hdb. For the avoidance of doubt here, can you give me the
    command line I will need for cfdisk (I am assuming here that this is a
    shell command) to erase the unwanted partitions on hda, leaving me
    with my existing 39Gb Windows partition and one 39Gb FAT32 partition I
    can use for my Ubuntu programs? I have looked at the man page for
    cfdisk and it is a bit puzzling...

    Steve


  4. Re: Partitioning problem

    stevewy@hotmail.com wrote:

    >My choice would be to use cfdisk to first delete hda2 and
    > above, then create a new hda2 using all of the available
    > space.
    >
    > I have looked at /etc/fstab as you suggested, and my current working
    > Ubuntu does not need any of the hda partitions, as it is installed
    > entirely on hdb. For the avoidance of doubt here, can you give me the
    > command line I will need for cfdisk (I am assuming here that this is a
    > shell command) to erase the unwanted partitions on hda, leaving me
    > with my existing 39Gb Windows partition and one 39Gb FAT32 partition I
    > can use for my Ubuntu programs? I have looked at the man page for
    > cfdisk and it is a bit puzzling...
    >
    > Steve


    cfdisk is curses-based ... a poor-man's gui. Run it as root and
    point it at your main drive (be sure none of hda is mounted):

    $ sudo cfdisk /dev/hda

    (It will look sorta like this

    cfdisk 2.12r

    Disk Drive: /dev/hda
    Size: 80060424192 bytes, 80.0 GB
    Heads: 255 Sectors per Track: 63 Cylinders: 9733

    Name Flags Part Type FS Type [Label] Size (MB)
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    hda1 Boot Primary NTFS 35370
    hda2 Primary NTFS 20020
    hda3 Primary ext3 16360
    hda5 Logical Linux swap / Solaris 745.17

    [Bootable] [ Delete ] [ Help ] [Maximize] [ Print ] [ Quit ]
    [ Type ] [ Units ] [ Write ]

    Toggle bootable flag of the current partition

    Navigation: up/down arrows move partition selection, left/right
    arrows move operation selection.

    Highlight hda5, select Delete. Repeat for hda3, then hda2.
    Now select the free space and create a new primary partition
    starting at the beginning of the free space and occupying all
    of the space. Menus will guide you. Then set the type to
    83 for linux. Finally (and most important), look at the new
    arrangement...last chance!! Now select Write and cfdisk will
    revise the partition table to your specifications. Then choose
    Quit. You do have that backup, yes?

    cfdisk has changed the partition table (only). You must format
    the newly assigned space. First reboot. It's not really needed
    in this particular case, but good practice after any partition
    table change.

    Format the fs of your choice; e.g., sudo mkfs -t ext3 /dev/hda2
    Revise /etc/fstab to tell Ubuntu what you did.

    Roby

  5. Re: Partitioning problem

    Roby wrote:

    > stevewy@hotmail.com wrote:
    >
    >>My choice would be to use cfdisk to first delete hda2 and
    >> above, then create a new hda2 using all of the available
    >> space.
    >>
    >> I have looked at /etc/fstab as you suggested, and my current working
    >> Ubuntu does not need any of the hda partitions, as it is installed
    >> entirely on hdb. For the avoidance of doubt here, can you give me the
    >> command line I will need for cfdisk (I am assuming here that this is a
    >> shell command) to erase the unwanted partitions on hda, leaving me
    >> with my existing 39Gb Windows partition and one 39Gb FAT32 partition I
    >> can use for my Ubuntu programs? I have looked at the man page for
    >> cfdisk and it is a bit puzzling...
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > cfdisk is curses-based ... a poor-man's gui. Run it as root and
    > point it at your main drive (be sure none of hda is mounted):
    >
    > $ sudo cfdisk /dev/hda
    >
    > (It will look sorta like this
    >
    > cfdisk 2.12r
    >
    > Disk Drive: /dev/hda
    > Size: 80060424192 bytes, 80.0 GB
    > Heads: 255 Sectors per Track: 63 Cylinders: 9733
    >
    > Name Flags Part Type FS Type [Label] Size (MB)
    > --------------------------------------------------------------
    > hda1 Boot Primary NTFS 35370
    > hda2 Primary NTFS 20020
    > hda3 Primary ext3 16360
    > hda5 Logical Linux swap / Solaris 745.17
    >
    > [Bootable] [ Delete ] [ Help ] [Maximize] [ Print ] [ Quit ]
    > [ Type ] [ Units ] [ Write ]
    >
    > Toggle bootable flag of the current partition
    >
    > Navigation: up/down arrows move partition selection, left/right
    > arrows move operation selection.
    >
    > Highlight hda5, select Delete. Repeat for hda3, then hda2.
    > Now select the free space and create a new primary partition
    > starting at the beginning of the free space and occupying all
    > of the space. Menus will guide you. Then set the type to
    > 83 for linux. Finally (and most important), look at the new
    > arrangement...last chance!! Now select Write and cfdisk will
    > revise the partition table to your specifications. Then choose
    > Quit. You do have that backup, yes?
    >
    > cfdisk has changed the partition table (only). You must format
    > the newly assigned space. First reboot. It's not really needed
    > in this particular case, but good practice after any partition
    > table change.
    >
    > Format the fs of your choice; e.g., sudo mkfs -t ext3 /dev/hda2
    > Revise /etc/fstab to tell Ubuntu what you did.
    >
    > Roby


    Small correction: I misunderstood the final format of the new hda2.
    Choose the type number for fat32, and mkfs -t vfat /dev/hda2.


  6. Re: Partitioning problem

    On Jul 2, 9:16 am, Roby wrote:
    > Roby wrote:
    > > stev...@hotmail.com wrote:

    >
    > >>My choice would be to use cfdisk to first delete hda2 and
    > >> above, then create a new hda2 using all of the available
    > >> space.

    >
    > >> I have looked at /etc/fstab as you suggested, and my current working
    > >> Ubuntu does not need any of the hda partitions, as it is installed
    > >> entirely on hdb. For the avoidance of doubt here, can you give me the
    > >> command line I will need for cfdisk (I am assuming here that this is a
    > >> shell command) to erase the unwanted partitions on hda, leaving me
    > >> with my existing 39Gb Windows partition and one 39Gb FAT32 partition I
    > >> can use for my Ubuntu programs? I have looked at the man page for
    > >> cfdisk and it is a bit puzzling...

    >
    > >> Steve

    >
    > > cfdisk is curses-based ... a poor-man's gui. Run it as root and
    > > point it at your main drive (be sure none of hda is mounted):

    >
    > > $ sudo cfdisk /dev/hda

    >
    > > (It will look sorta like this

    >
    > > cfdisk 2.12r

    >
    > > Disk Drive: /dev/hda
    > > Size: 80060424192 bytes, 80.0 GB
    > > Heads: 255 Sectors per Track: 63 Cylinders: 9733

    >
    > > Name Flags Part Type FS Type [Label] Size (MB)
    > > --------------------------------------------------------------
    > > hda1 Boot Primary NTFS 35370
    > > hda2 Primary NTFS 20020
    > > hda3 Primary ext3 16360
    > > hda5 Logical Linux swap / Solaris 745.17

    >
    > > [Bootable] [ Delete ] [ Help ] [Maximize] [ Print ] [ Quit ]
    > > [ Type ] [ Units ] [ Write ]

    >
    > > Toggle bootable flag of the current partition

    >
    > > Navigation: up/down arrows move partition selection, left/right
    > > arrows move operation selection.

    >
    > > Highlight hda5, select Delete. Repeat for hda3, then hda2.
    > > Now select the free space and create a new primary partition
    > > starting at the beginning of the free space and occupying all
    > > of the space. Menus will guide you. Then set the type to
    > > 83 for linux. Finally (and most important), look at the new
    > > arrangement...last chance!! Now select Write and cfdisk will
    > > revise the partition table to your specifications. Then choose
    > > Quit. You do have that backup, yes?

    >
    > > cfdisk has changed the partition table (only). You must format
    > > the newly assigned space. First reboot. It's not really needed
    > > in this particular case, but good practice after any partition
    > > table change.

    >
    > > Format the fs of your choice; e.g., sudo mkfs -t ext3 /dev/hda2
    > > Revise /etc/fstab to tell Ubuntu what you did.

    >
    > > Roby

    >
    > Small correction: I misunderstood the final format of the new hda2.
    > Choose the type number for fat32, and mkfs -t vfat /dev/hda2.


    Following the above discussion, I didnt see where the Windows OS is
    on NTFS
    or on VFAT. Big distinction. If you have the OS disk, you could
    reformat the partition as VFAT which will allow you to use, write,
    edit, files across OSs.
    Otherwise you can Samba. If this is not a problem, well have a nice
    day.

    Zeno



  7. Re: Partitioning problem

    Bit too late for that now, as I read your original message and did
    what you said on 1 July. I've only just got back to this newsgroup
    and read your correction. However, it is not essential it is FAT32 -
    I just want something that Linux will read from and write to. I have
    my original C: partition of 40Gb for all my Windows stuff, so the
    other 40Gb for Linux-only stuff is only right and proper!

    However, one tiny problem - how do I edit FSTAB to put my new
    partition details in? I have located the file, but when I double-
    click on it, it comes up as Read Only.

    Now I have re-booted, I find I still only have 1.2Gb available,
    instead of 39.4Gb which it should be. I presume this is because my
    Ubuntu is reading the partition details from FSTAB, and they are wrong
    because I haven't corrected them yet; and that my disk is still
    partitioned with my hda2 as 39.4Gb.

    Please advise.

    Steve


  8. Re: Partitioning problem

    stevewy@hotmail.com wrote:

    > Bit too late for that now, as I read your original message and did
    > what you said on 1 July. I've only just got back to this newsgroup
    > and read your correction. However, it is not essential it is FAT32 -
    > I just want something that Linux will read from and write to. I have
    > my original C: partition of 40Gb for all my Windows stuff, so the
    > other 40Gb for Linux-only stuff is only right and proper!
    >
    > However, one tiny problem - how do I edit FSTAB to put my new
    > partition details in? I have located the file, but when I double-
    > click on it, it comes up as Read Only.
    >
    > Now I have re-booted, I find I still only have 1.2Gb available,
    > instead of 39.4Gb which it should be. I presume this is because my
    > Ubuntu is reading the partition details from FSTAB, and they are wrong
    > because I haven't corrected them yet; and that my disk is still
    > partitioned with my hda2 as 39.4Gb.
    >
    > Please advise.
    >
    > Steve


    You'll need root privilege to change /etc/fstab; e.g.,
    $ sudo nano /etc/fstab
    or
    $ sudo mc /etc
    or whatever it takes to get your favorite gui editor to run as root.

    The easiest entry would be something like:
    /dev/hda2 /mnt/hda2 ext3 defaults 0 2
    (If this is the last line of the file, be sure it ends with a carriage
    return.)

    .... and you may need to create the mount point with:
    $ sudo mkdir /mnt/hda2

    It is stylish to use one of those remarkable UUID's to name the device.
    You'll probably find the rest of your fstab written this way. You can
    look up the UUID for the new partition like this:
    $ sudo /lib/udev/vol_id /dev/hda2

    Sooooo much to learn, so little time. Be brave. It is worth it!

    Roby

  9. Re: Partitioning problem

    I'll give it a go tonight when I get home. Thanks for all your
    assistance.

    I'm using an older version of Ubuntu at the moment, because I bought a
    book on Learning Ubuntu Linux and it had a CD at the back of the book
    to use. It is an old version but I figured since the book directly
    refers to its features during its explanations, I'd better stick with
    it while I'm still learning. Once I've got to grips with the basics,
    I can seek out and install the latest version, probably "Feisty Fawn",
    which I understand can read and write to NTFS partitions anyway. I
    imagine before long all the major distros will go over to NTFS, so as
    to be compatible with the inevitable Windows partitions and data
    that's already on most people's PCs when they install Linux.

    Steve


+ Reply to Thread