How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch - Setup

This is a discussion on How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch - Setup ; Hi, I've cloned (with dd and netcat) a physical sistem with CentOS 4 to a VMware VM. When I staty the VM, I get a kernel panic, because it doesn't recognize the new (virtual) SCSI controller and thus it cannot ...

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Thread: How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch

  1. How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch

    Hi,

    I've cloned (with dd and netcat) a physical sistem with CentOS 4 to a
    VMware VM.

    When I staty the VM, I get a kernel panic, because it doesn't recognize
    the new (virtual) SCSI controller and thus it cannot mount the root
    filesystem.

    So I've restarted the VM with the CentOS CD in rescue mode, I've done a
    chroot to the root filesystem and now I'd like to create a new ramdisk
    image with the right SCSI controller module using the mkinitrd utility.

    How do I create a new /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch (since the
    current one is from the old physical system and doesn't apply to the new
    VM with different hardware), to have the mkinitrd utility create a new
    ramdisk image to boot the VM?

    Is there any utility to recognize the new hardware and create the
    /etc/modprobe.conf file or am I supposed to edit it manually?

    When you install CentOS for the first time, how does the
    /etc/modprobe.conf get generated?

    Thanks.

  2. Re: How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch

    On 19 May, 08:50, maxim2k wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I've cloned (with dd and netcat) a physical sistem with CentOS 4 to a
    > VMware VM.
    >
    > When I staty the VM, I get a kernel panic, because it doesn't recognize
    > the new (virtual) SCSI controller and thus it cannot mount the root
    > filesystem.
    >
    > So I've restarted the VM with the CentOS CD in rescue mode, I've done a
    > chroot to the root filesystem and now I'd like to create a new ramdisk
    > image with the right SCSI controller module using the mkinitrd utility.
    >
    > How do I create a new /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch (since the
    > current one is from the old physical system and doesn't apply to the new
    > VM with different hardware), to have the mkinitrd utility create a new
    > ramdisk image to boot the VM?
    >
    > Is there any utility to recognize the new hardware and create the
    > /etc/modprobe.conf file or am I supposed to edit it manually?
    >
    > When you install CentOS for the first time, how does the
    > /etc/modprobe.conf get generated?


    Why not do a clean CentOS installation to another partition via VMware
    and an installation CD, and read the modprobe.conf from that one?


  3. Re: How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch

    On 5/19/07 10:41 PM, Nico wrote:
    > Why not do a clean CentOS installation to another partition via VMware
    > and an installation CD, and read the modprobe.conf from that one?


    Yes, that would work, but I thought there was a quicker way to fix it.

    Afterall when you do an new Linux installation, the modprobe.conf file
    gets created from scratch, I wonder how it does ...

    Thannk.

  4. Re: How to create the /etc/modprobe.conf file from scratch

    On 20 May, 07:26, maxim2k wrote:
    > On 5/19/07 10:41 PM, Nico wrote:
    >
    > > Why not do a clean CentOS installation to another partition via VMware
    > > and an installation CD, and read the modprobe.conf from that one?

    >
    > Yes, that would work, but I thought there was a quicker way to fix it.
    >
    > Afterall when you do an new Linux installation, the modprobe.conf file
    > gets created from scratch, I wonder how it does ...
    >
    > Thannk.


    A farirly significant set of drivers are either hard-loaded into the
    kernel, or hard-coded into the initrd.img for the CD or floppy image:
    enough to access most basic types of hardware enougeither h to mount
    and make accessible the rest of the drivers from the CD or network
    boot. It's a real bootstrap sort of process.

    Then Anaconda or the installer is supposed to do some guessing and
    poking to detect the rest of the hardware and stores the generated
    list in the new system's modprobe.conf.


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