Installing new system drive, doesn't work? - Setup

This is a discussion on Installing new system drive, doesn't work? - Setup ; Hey all... I have been using RedHat for a long time then changed over to Fedora Core at some point. Whenever I wanted to upgrade my system drive to a larger one, I would do it this way: 1) Add ...

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  1. Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Hey all... I have been using RedHat for a long time then changed over to
    Fedora Core at some point.

    Whenever I wanted to upgrade my system drive to a larger one, I would do
    it this way:

    1) Add the new drive as secondary
    2) Partition/format it
    3) 'cp -a' everything from the primary system drive partitions to the
    new drive's partitions
    4) Shut down and reinstall the new drive as primary
    5) Boot up with a boot CD and re-install the boot loader on the new
    primary drive

    I was then up and running on the new hard drive.

    This worked great with RH, but when I tried this with FC5, I got weird
    errors trying to boot up the new drive in step 5. When booting using the
    boot CD, it would get a few lines into the install, to a line that
    starts with "udev: ...." then give me the error:

    /proc/misc: No entry for device-mapper found

    I installed grub to the new system drive by booting a rescue disk. When
    I try to boot the new system drive on its own, grub runs and the Linux
    install starts up then says:

    Could not find file system '/dev/root'

    And some other related errors.

    What's wrong with this procedure and/or what do these errors mean?

    I can provide more details around the errors if needed, I just have to
    write them all down next time. Thanks.

  2. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:
    > Hey all... I have been using RedHat for a long time then changed over to
    > Fedora Core at some point.


    > Whenever I wanted to upgrade my system drive to a larger one, I would do
    > it this way:


    > 1) Add the new drive as secondary
    > 2) Partition/format it
    > 3) 'cp -a' everything from the primary system drive partitions to the
    > new drive's partitions
    > 4) Shut down and reinstall the new drive as primary
    > 5) Boot up with a boot CD and re-install the boot loader on the new
    > primary drive


    > I was then up and running on the new hard drive.


    I have never tried doing it that way. I simply installed the new drive,
    installed the OS and then changed the BIOS to boot on the new drive first. I
    guess you would then cp -aR all the files of interest. Although with a new
    install I would think change /home to a symbolic link to the /home on the other
    drive.

    So worst comes to worst put them back the way you started and change the BIOS.
    At least that should get it working right away and you can figure it out what
    the problem is later.

    Although frankly I don't see why you would want to do this when you can
    continue with the old drive and use the larger drive only for data storage.

    > This worked great with RH, but when I tried this with FC5, I got weird
    > errors trying to boot up the new drive in step 5. When booting using the
    > boot CD, it would get a few lines into the install, to a line that
    > starts with "udev: ...." then give me the error:


    > /proc/misc: No entry for device-mapper found


    > I installed grub to the new system drive by booting a rescue disk. When
    > I try to boot the new system drive on its own, grub runs and the Linux
    > install starts up then says:


    > Could not find file system '/dev/root'


    > And some other related errors.


    > What's wrong with this procedure and/or what do these errors mean?


    > I can provide more details around the errors if needed, I just have to
    > write them all down next time. Thanks.


    I can't help as I never screwed up this way but as least you can get your new
    drive installed as above. Out of curiosity why do you not keep the old drive as
    the boot drive and just use the larger drive for data?

    --
    In the last hundred years all invasions have been repelled no matter how
    long they lasted. All invasions that were kept alive to the 20th century
    were ended. All "we are just here to help" invasions were expelled. Why does
    Bush think he will turn the tide of history in Iraq?
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3766
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    environmentalism http://www.giwersworld.org/environment/aehb.phtml a9

  3. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Thanks for the reply Matt. My comments below...

    Matt Giwer wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >> Hey all... I have been using RedHat for a long time then changed over
    >> to Fedora Core at some point.

    >
    >> Whenever I wanted to upgrade my system drive to a larger one, I would
    >> do it this way:

    >
    >> 1) Add the new drive as secondary
    >> 2) Partition/format it
    >> 3) 'cp -a' everything from the primary system drive partitions to the
    >> new drive's partitions
    >> 4) Shut down and reinstall the new drive as primary
    >> 5) Boot up with a boot CD and re-install the boot loader on the new
    >> primary drive

    >
    >> I was then up and running on the new hard drive.

    >
    > I have never tried doing it that way. I simply installed the new
    > drive, installed the OS and then changed the BIOS to boot on the new
    > drive first. I guess you would then cp -aR all the files of interest.
    > Although with a new install I would think change /home to a symbolic
    > link to the /home on the other drive.


    The way I'm doing it has always worked smoothly before and I don't have
    to reinstall the OS. The method you're proposing is more fool proof
    though, and I always use it when doing this type of operation for a
    Windows installation (using XCOPY).

    > So worst comes to worst put them back the way you started and change
    > the BIOS. At least that should get it working right away and you can
    > figure it out what the problem is later.


    Change the BIOS? Not sure I know what change you mean.
    >
    > Although frankly I don't see why you would want to do this when you
    > can continue with the old drive and use the larger drive only for data
    > storage.


    The new drive is plenty large on its own. And I have another application
    in mind for the drive I'm replacing.

    >
    >> This worked great with RH, but when I tried this with FC5, I got weird
    >> errors trying to boot up the new drive in step 5. When booting using
    >> the boot CD, it would get a few lines into the install, to a line that
    >> starts with "udev: ...." then give me the error:

    >
    >> /proc/misc: No entry for device-mapper found

    >
    >> I installed grub to the new system drive by booting a rescue disk.
    >> When I try to boot the new system drive on its own, grub runs and the
    >> Linux install starts up then says:

    >
    >> Could not find file system '/dev/root'

    >
    >> And some other related errors.

    >
    >> What's wrong with this procedure and/or what do these errors mean?

    >
    >> I can provide more details around the errors if needed, I just have to
    >> write them all down next time. Thanks.

    >
    > I can't help as I never screwed up this way but as least you can get
    > your new drive installed as above. Out of curiosity why do you not keep
    > the old drive as the boot drive and just use the larger drive for data?


    As I mentioned above, I intend to use the drive I replace for another
    project.

  4. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:
    > Hey all... I have been using RedHat for a long time then changed over to
    > Fedora Core at some point.
    >
    > Whenever I wanted to upgrade my system drive to a larger one, I would do
    > it this way:
    >
    > 1) Add the new drive as secondary
    > 2) Partition/format it
    > 3) 'cp -a' everything from the primary system drive partitions to the
    > new drive's partitions
    > 4) Shut down and reinstall the new drive as primary
    > 5) Boot up with a boot CD and re-install the boot loader on the new
    > primary drive
    >
    > I was then up and running on the new hard drive.
    >
    > This worked great with RH, but when I tried this with FC5, I got weird
    > errors trying to boot up the new drive in step 5. When booting using the
    > boot CD, it would get a few lines into the install, to a line that
    > starts with "udev: ...." then give me the error:
    >
    > /proc/misc: No entry for device-mapper found
    >
    > I installed grub to the new system drive by booting a rescue disk. When
    > I try to boot the new system drive on its own, grub runs and the Linux
    > install starts up then says:
    >
    > Could not find file system '/dev/root'
    >
    > And some other related errors.
    >
    > What's wrong with this procedure and/or what do these errors mean?
    >
    > I can provide more details around the errors if needed, I just have to
    > write them all down next time. Thanks.


    I also get the message, "Is the device-mapper missing from kernel?"

    Which it should not be since this is a direct copy of my working system.

    So nobody knows why this doesn't work? I've been trying to find good
    info on what could cause the device-mapper to appear "missing" but
    haven't found anything yet.

    Thanks for any further input.

  5. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:

    > So nobody knows why this doesn't work? I've been trying to find good
    > info on what could cause the device-mapper to appear "missing" but
    > haven't found anything yet.


    Are you sure you copied it correctly? It sounds like you may have
    inadvertently copied a dynamic /dev onto the new disk, creating a static /dev.

    Don't boot from the system you want to copy, but boot from a rescue disk, then
    use dd to make the copies. Then remove the initial disk, and install your
    newly created disk as primary master (for IDE). You may need to boot from the
    rescue disk again, chroot into your newly created root partition and run lilo
    to configure the boot record. The system should now boot normally.

    Regards,

    Mark.

    >
    > Thanks for any further input.


    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/

  6. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Hobley wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >
    >> So nobody knows why this doesn't work? I've been trying to find good
    >> info on what could cause the device-mapper to appear "missing" but
    >> haven't found anything yet.

    >
    > Are you sure you copied it correctly? It sounds like you may have
    > inadvertently copied a dynamic /dev onto the new disk, creating a static /dev.
    >
    > Don't boot from the system you want to copy, but boot from a rescue disk, then
    > use dd to make the copies. Then remove the initial disk, and install your
    > newly created disk as primary master (for IDE). You may need to boot from the
    > rescue disk again, chroot into your newly created root partition and run lilo
    > to configure the boot record. The system should now boot normally.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Mark.


    Thanks Mark. I did cp /dev which is what I had done in the past.

    The reason I didn't use dd is because my new partition sizes are larger
    and after using dd they appear to the system to have the same amount of
    space as the old partition.

    Is there a list somewhere of what the dynamic /dev items are so that I
    don't copy those?

  7. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:

    > Is there a list somewhere of what the dynamic /dev items are so that I
    > don't copy those?


    If you are using a udev system, then you don't copy any of them, since /dev is
    now a virtual filesystem.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/


  8. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Hobley wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a list somewhere of what the dynamic /dev items are so that I
    >> don't copy those?

    >
    > If you are using a udev system, then you don't copy any of them, since /dev is
    > now a virtual filesystem.
    >
    > Mark.
    >


    Thanks, again, Mark.

    I tried using an empty /dev and I still go the error that it couldn't
    find the /dev/root file system. This message has been consistently in my
    list of errors.

    There's got to be a simple way for this to work, just have to find the
    incantation... I would really like to avoid going through an OS install
    (having to reselect all those packages again) then get all my customized
    stuff up and running again (ruby on rails, samba server setups, etc).

  9. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:
    > Thanks for the reply Matt. My comments below...
    > Matt Giwer wrote:
    >> Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >>> Hey all... I have been using RedHat for a long time then changed over
    >>> to Fedora Core at some point.
    >>> Whenever I wanted to upgrade my system drive to a larger one, I would
    >>> do it this way:
    >>> 1) Add the new drive as secondary
    >>> 2) Partition/format it
    >>> 3) 'cp -a' everything from the primary system drive partitions to the
    >>> new drive's partitions
    >>> 4) Shut down and reinstall the new drive as primary
    >>> 5) Boot up with a boot CD and re-install the boot loader on the new
    >>> primary drive

    >>
    >>> I was then up and running on the new hard drive.

    >>
    >> I have never tried doing it that way. I simply installed the new
    >> drive, installed the OS and then changed the BIOS to boot on the new
    >> drive first. I guess you would then cp -aR all the files of interest.
    >> Although with a new install I would think change /home to a symbolic
    >> link to the /home on the other drive.

    >
    > The way I'm doing it has always worked smoothly before and I don't have
    > to reinstall the OS. The method you're proposing is more fool proof
    > though, and I always use it when doing this type of operation for a
    > Windows installation (using XCOPY).
    >
    >> So worst comes to worst put them back the way you started and
    >> change the BIOS. At least that should get it working right away and
    >> you can figure it out what the problem is later.

    >
    > Change the BIOS? Not sure I know what change you mean.


    It is F2 or DEL while booting, whatever it says on the screen. Then one of your
    options is to change the sequence of drives where the computer looks for a boot
    sector. Usually it is something like HDA then HDB then CDROM but you can change
    the order so it looks at HDB first. Not HDA but whatever the BIOS names them.

    >> Although frankly I don't see why you would want to do this when
    >> you can continue with the old drive and use the larger drive only for
    >> data storage.


    > The new drive is plenty large on its own. And I have another application
    > in mind for the drive I'm replacing.


    >>> This worked great with RH, but when I tried this with FC5, I got
    >>> weird errors trying to boot up the new drive in step 5. When booting
    >>> using the boot CD, it would get a few lines into the install, to a
    >>> line that starts with "udev: ...." then give me the error:

    >>
    >>> /proc/misc: No entry for device-mapper found

    >>
    >>> I installed grub to the new system drive by booting a rescue disk.
    >>> When I try to boot the new system drive on its own, grub runs and the
    >>> Linux install starts up then says:

    >>
    >>> Could not find file system '/dev/root'

    >>
    >>> And some other related errors.

    >>
    >>> What's wrong with this procedure and/or what do these errors mean?

    >>
    >>> I can provide more details around the errors if needed, I just have
    >>> to write them all down next time. Thanks.

    >>
    >> I can't help as I never screwed up this way but as least you can
    >> get your new drive installed as above. Out of curiosity why do you not
    >> keep the old drive as the boot drive and just use the larger drive for
    >> data?

    >
    > As I mentioned above, I intend to use the drive I replace for another
    > project.


    I had another thought which is probably just an oversight but you do say you
    used cp -a Is not the correct command cp -aR ? That would explain your empty
    /proc or whatever.

    --
    America must stay in Iraq so Iraqis can hold demonstrations demanding
    Americans leave Iraq. -- George Bush
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3754
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    book review http://www.giwersworld.org/israel/wi...utioners.phtml a7

  10. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:

    > Thanks, again, Mark.
    >
    > I tried using an empty /dev and I still go the error that it couldn't
    > find the /dev/root file system. This message has been consistently in my
    > list of errors.


    You need to run lilo with an appropriate configuration file to tell it where
    to locate the root file system.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/


  11. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Hobley wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks, again, Mark.
    >>
    >> I tried using an empty /dev and I still go the error that it couldn't
    >> find the /dev/root file system. This message has been consistently in my
    >> list of errors.

    >
    > You need to run lilo with an appropriate configuration file to tell it where
    > to locate the root file system.
    >
    > Mark.
    >


    I'm using GRUB. I've already run it, using the same config file I had
    before (since none of my drive mappings have changed) and it will start
    loading the kernel and initializing, then fails with the above errors.

  12. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >
    > I'm using GRUB. I've already run it, using the same config file I had
    > before (since none of my drive mappings have changed) and it will start
    > loading the kernel and initializing, then fails with the above errors.


    You need to do the same with grub. I use lilo here, so I don't know how to use
    grub, but there must be a parameter to tell the system which partition is root.

    I found something like this on a search engine, if that means anything to you:

    grub> root (hd0,1)

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/


  13. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Matt Giwer wrote:
    > I had another thought which is probably just an oversight but you do
    > say you used cp -a Is not the correct command cp -aR ? That would
    > explain your empty /proc or whatever.
    >


    cp -a == cp -dpR

  14. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Hobley wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >> I'm using GRUB. I've already run it, using the same config file I had
    >> before (since none of my drive mappings have changed) and it will start
    >> loading the kernel and initializing, then fails with the above errors.

    >
    > You need to do the same with grub. I use lilo here, so I don't know how to use
    > grub, but there must be a parameter to tell the system which partition is root.
    >
    > I found something like this on a search engine, if that means anything to you:
    >
    > grub> root (hd0,1)
    >
    > Mark.
    >

    Yeah, I did all that, ran grub the way I thought I should, etc. Modified
    grub.conf the way I thought it should. It just isn't recognizing the
    drives (it doesn't see swap space either).

    There's something in the drive mapping business that's making it not
    find things, I'm just trying to figure out what these error messages are
    pointing to.

  15. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Hobley wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >> I'm using GRUB. I've already run it, using the same config file I had
    >> before (since none of my drive mappings have changed) and it will start
    >> loading the kernel and initializing, then fails with the above errors.

    >
    > You need to do the same with grub. I use lilo here, so I don't know how to use
    > grub, but there must be a parameter to tell the system which partition is root.
    >
    > I found something like this on a search engine, if that means anything to you:
    >
    > grub> root (hd0,1)
    >
    > Mark.
    >


    OK this time I wrote down all the messages (phew...)

    If I don't "cp -a" the /sys and /dev directories, then I get the same
    error whether I boot directly from the new hard drive, or if I use a
    boot CD to get there:

    -----
    > Uncompressing Linux... OK, booting the kernel
    > Red Hat nash version 5.0.32 starting
    > Unable to access resume device (LABEL=SWAP-hda4)
    > mount: could not find filesystem '/dev/root'
    > setuproot: moving /dev/failed: No such file or directory
    > ...
    > (system halts)

    -----

    If I "cp -a" my original /dev directory to the new drive, then I get a
    different failure mode when using a boot CD:

    -----
    > Uncompressing Linux... OK, booting the kernel
    > Red Hat nash version 5.0.32 starting
    > Unable to access resume device (LABEL=SWAP-hda4)
    > INIT version ....
    >
    > Setting clock..[OK]
    > Starting udev: [OK]
    > Loading default key map (us) [OK]
    > Setting hostname [OK]
    > Checking filesystems:
    > fsck.ext3: Is a directory while trying to open /
    > ...
    > (system drops into maintenance mode with boot drive in R/O state)


    I tried "hard coding" (not using LABEL) the root and swap drives in
    fstab and grub.conf, and it still gives identical results.

    Mark

  16. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    I demand that Mark Bratcher may or may not have written...

    [snip]
    > OK this time I wrote down all the messages (phew...)


    > If I don't "cp -a" the /sys and /dev directories, then I get the same
    > error whether I boot directly from the new hard drive, or if I use a
    > boot CD to get there:


    > -----
    > > Uncompressing Linux... OK, booting the kernel
    > > Red Hat nash version 5.0.32 starting
    > > Unable to access resume device (LABEL=SWAP-hda4)
    > > mount: could not find filesystem '/dev/root'
    > > setuproot: moving /dev/failed: No such file or directory
    > > ...
    > > (system halts)

    > -----


    Are you sure? ISTM that there's a *lot* missing there - maybe you need to
    remove 'quiet' from the kernel parameters. (That said, there'll then be a lot
    of output which isn't relevant, but maybe something more which is relevant.)

    [snip]
    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | + Burn less waste. Use less packaging. Waste less. USE FEWER RESOURCES.

    Disk is not bootable, 0:1

  17. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Darren Salt wrote:
    > I demand that Mark Bratcher may or may not have written...
    >
    > [snip]
    >> OK this time I wrote down all the messages (phew...)

    >
    >> If I don't "cp -a" the /sys and /dev directories, then I get the same
    >> error whether I boot directly from the new hard drive, or if I use a
    >> boot CD to get there:

    >
    >> -----
    >> > Uncompressing Linux... OK, booting the kernel
    >> > Red Hat nash version 5.0.32 starting
    >> > Unable to access resume device (LABEL=SWAP-hda4)
    >> > mount: could not find filesystem '/dev/root'
    >> > setuproot: moving /dev/failed: No such file or directory
    >> > ...
    >> > (system halts)

    >> -----

    >
    > Are you sure? ISTM that there's a *lot* missing there - maybe you need to
    > remove 'quiet' from the kernel parameters. (That said, there'll then be a lot
    > of output which isn't relevant, but maybe something more which is relevant.)
    >
    > [snip]


    Before the "Uncompressing Linux..." line there's very little (just grub
    saying it found the kernel).

    The other ... are a couple more setuproot messages indicating a couple
    of other "no such file or directory" errors for proc and something else.

    The grub.conf does set "quiet" mode by default. I can switch that off
    and see what I get...

  18. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Bratcher wrote:

    > The other ... are a couple more setuproot messages indicating a couple
    > of other "no such file or directory" errors for proc and something else.


    You may need to create an empty /proc directory.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/


  19. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    Mark Hobley wrote:
    > Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >
    >> The other ... are a couple more setuproot messages indicating a couple
    >> of other "no such file or directory" errors for proc and something else.

    >
    > You may need to create an empty /proc directory.
    >


    I did. I always create empty directories for /sys /proc and /dev.

  20. Re: Installing new system drive, doesn't work?

    I demand that Mark Bratcher may or may not have written...

    > Mark Hobley wrote:
    >> Mark Bratcher wrote:
    >>> The other ... are a couple more setuproot messages indicating a couple
    >>> of other "no such file or directory" errors for proc and something else.

    >> You may need to create an empty /proc directory.


    > I did. I always create empty directories for /sys /proc and /dev.


    But not /tmp? That tends to be a tmpfs mount point these days.

    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | + Use more efficient products. Use less. BE MORE ENERGY EFFICIENT.

    The earth is like a tiny grain of sand, only much, much heavier.

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