Is there an easy way to install apps on Linux - Setup

This is a discussion on Is there an easy way to install apps on Linux - Setup ; Hi, I am new to Linux. I installed Ubuntu, and coninuously need to add applications that may not be on their Synaptic Program Manager. Is there a way to get other applications into the SPM? Or any other way to ...

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Thread: Is there an easy way to install apps on Linux

  1. Is there an easy way to install apps on Linux

    Hi,

    I am new to Linux. I installed Ubuntu, and coninuously need to add
    applications that may not be on their Synaptic Program Manager.

    Is there a way to get other applications into the SPM? Or any other
    way to install apps automatically?

    I do not want to have to type in a bunch of cryptic commands every
    time I need to install a new application. If it was once every couple
    months I'd be OK with it, and nevermind that manual installation
    should have went the way of the dinosoar DOS, 20 years ago!

    Otherwise I am real happy with Ubuntu, the installation was a dream,
    completely hands off, miles ahead of any Windows installation
    process!!

    Any suggestions are appreciated.

    Thanks

    Roger


  2. Re: Is there an easy way to install apps on Linux

    In comp.os.linux.setup Roger :
    > Hi,


    > I am new to Linux. I installed Ubuntu, and coninuously need to add
    > applications that may not be on their Synaptic Program Manager.


    > Is there a way to get other applications into the SPM? Or any other
    > way to install apps automatically?


    How to install ANYTHING in Ubuntu!

    http://monkeyblog.org/ubuntu/installing/

    Looks helpful.

    Good luck

    [..]

    --
    Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
    mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
    #bofh excuse 314: You need to upgrade your VESA local bus to
    a MasterCard local bus.

  3. Re: Is there an easy way to install apps on Linux

    On 11 May 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.setup, in article
    <1178916210.460432.243210@e51g2000hsg.googlegroups. com>, Roger wrote:

    >I am new to Linux. I installed Ubuntu, and coninuously need to add
    >applications that may not be on their Synaptic Program Manager.


    As you are new to Linux, your best bet is to use the applications that
    come with your distribution (or in the case of *buntu, the applications
    available through Debian), and you _REALLY_ want to be using the
    package manager for this.

    1: The packages have been inspected, poked at, tested AND someone
    is keeping an eye on it for security problems.

    2: The package manager keeps track of what is installed, where, and
    what conflicts and dependencies exist, AND how to resolve them.

    3. The package manager can handle updates, and the safe removal of
    packages without breaking the system.

    Do you know how to do all of that? Are you aware of the consequences
    if you are not able to do so?

    Unlike windoze, there are (literally) hundreds of different Linux
    distributions, and they use several different package tools. Most often,
    packages are built for a specific release of a specific distribution,
    much as a fender for a 2006 Plymouth PT Cruiser isn't going to fit very
    well on a 2004 Chevrolet Corvette. or a 1957 Ford Thunderbird. The
    common tool among all distributions is the tar file and compiling from
    source - which is still simpler than you trying to figure out how to
    bash that piece of sheet metal (or fiberglass) into something that may
    be made to fit and function like a fender.

    >I do not want to have to type in a bunch of cryptic commands every
    >time I need to install a new application.


    Then why are you using a keyboard? Can't you just click on some icon
    and have your thoughts translated directly to words in some web-form?

    >If it was once every couple months I'd be OK with it,


    uhuh

    >and nevermind that manual installation should have went the way of
    >the dinosoar DOS, 20 years ago!


    The reason it did not is because that cryptic command stuff can do things
    that your GUI can't do because the author never thought you'd need or
    want to do so. If the GUI author didn't include it, you can't do it.
    Amazing. Additionally, the commands can be chained together to do
    things quite different, and rapidly without much effort. In reality,
    while there are a lot of "cryptic" commands on the computer, you rarely
    use even ten percent of them. Here, there are over 1300 commands in my
    PATH as a user - yet I average using around 80 commands to accomplish
    everything I use the computer for. Tell me where the icons are that you
    can use to find out how many commands are on your system, and which ones
    you are using.

    Old guy


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