newbie double boot install issues - Setup

This is a discussion on newbie double boot install issues - Setup ; Hi all, I have two 186 GB drives. Windows XP is on drive C:. I partitioned drive D: with 106GB unallocated space and then loaded Fedora Core 6 there. My problem is that when I reboot it goes straight to ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: newbie double boot install issues

  1. newbie double boot install issues

    Hi all,

    I have two 186 GB drives. Windows XP is on drive C:.
    I partitioned drive D: with 106GB unallocated space and then loaded Fedora
    Core 6 there.

    My problem is that when I reboot it goes straight to Windows XP. How do I
    adjust the boot settings so I get the dual boot option?

    (My bios is set to boot first A: them E: (my dvd drive) then the main C:
    drive)

    I haven't gone into rescue mode, my GRUB or touched anything yet. So how do
    I get a dual boot option?

    Regards,

    Rubyxx



  2. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    Rubyxx wrote:
    > Hi all,


    > I have two 186 GB drives. Windows XP is on drive C:.
    > I partitioned drive D: with 106GB unallocated space and then loaded Fedora
    > Core 6 there.


    > My problem is that when I reboot it goes straight to Windows XP. How do I
    > adjust the boot settings so I get the dual boot option?


    > (My bios is set to boot first A: them E: (my dvd drive) then the main C:
    > drive)


    As an interim, change BIOS to boot from D for linux, i.e. the sequence A: E: D:
    vice C:

    > I haven't gone into rescue mode, my GRUB or touched anything yet. So how do
    > I get a dual boot option?


    I haven't "fixed" this problem myself but someone here has the answer. From
    what I have read it is something about as simple as booting linux, going root
    and typing grub with no arguments.

    --
    So far Iran has shown more willingness to help the US in Iraq than has
    Israel.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3735
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    Mission Accomplished http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtml a12

  3. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    On 26 Apr, 22:50, Matt Giwer wrote:
    > Rubyxx wrote:
    > > Hi all,
    > > I have two 186 GB drives. Windows XP is on drive C:.
    > > I partitioned drive D: with 106GB unallocated space and then loaded Fedora
    > > Core 6 there.
    > > My problem is that when I reboot it goes straight to Windows XP. How do I
    > > adjust the boot settings so I get the dual boot option?
    > > (My bios is set to boot first A: them E: (my dvd drive) then the main C:
    > > drive)

    >
    > As an interim, change BIOS to boot from D for linux, i.e. the sequence A: E: D:
    > vice C:
    >
    > > I haven't gone into rescue mode, my GRUB or touched anything yet. So how do
    > > I get a dual boot option?

    >
    > I haven't "fixed" this problem myself but someone here has the answer. From
    > what I have read it is something about as simple as booting linux, going root
    > and typing grub with no arguments.
    >
    > --
    > So far Iran has shown more willingness to help the US in Iraq than has
    > Israel.
    > -- The Iron Webmaster, 3735
    > nizkorhttp://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    > Mission Accomplishedhttp://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtmla12


    What kind of drives are these? If they're IDE, I've had *fascinating*
    issues with the boot process of Linux detecting the wrong drive as /
    dev/hda. And when you installed Linux, where did you put the boot
    loader? On the Linux drive or the Windows drive?


  4. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    Hi ,

    I installed the bootloader and the full Linux install on a partition of the
    D: drive . Windows does not recognize it, as existent. It has merely reduced
    the apparent size of my D: drive from 186GB to 84GB.

    I have 2 IDE drives but faulty installation doesn't seem to be the main
    issue here as as Windows still works perfectly. I simply cannot get the
    invisible Linux booted.

    I just tried getting the bootloader to install on the C: drive but Fedora
    sent an error message....probably because there is no space pre-allocated to
    it on the C:drive.

    The problem seems to be either ...
    1. to find a way to get the Bios to optionally boot from the D: drive or
    2. to install the Linux bootloader in the main MBR on the C: drive and
    configure it to boot the D: drive Linux installation.

    Unfortunately I don't have the technical savvy to work out a solution.

    Best Regards,
    Rubyxx

    PS. I have an ASUS P4C800-E deluxe motherboard

    "Nico" wrote in message
    news:1177631646.243655.178100@s33g2000prh.googlegr oups.com...
    > On 26 Apr, 22:50, Matt Giwer wrote:
    >> Rubyxx wrote:
    >> > Hi all,
    >> > I have two 186 GB drives. Windows XP is on drive C:.
    >> > I partitioned drive D: with 106GB unallocated space and then loaded
    >> > Fedora
    >> > Core 6 there.
    >> > My problem is that when I reboot it goes straight to Windows XP. How do
    >> > I
    >> > adjust the boot settings so I get the dual boot option?
    >> > (My bios is set to boot first A: them E: (my dvd drive) then the main
    >> > C:
    >> > drive)

    >>
    >> As an interim, change BIOS to boot from D for linux, i.e. the
    >> sequence A: E: D:
    >> vice C:
    >>
    >> > I haven't gone into rescue mode, my GRUB or touched anything yet. So
    >> > how do
    >> > I get a dual boot option?

    >>
    >> I haven't "fixed" this problem myself but someone here has the
    >> answer. From
    >> what I have read it is something about as simple as booting linux, going
    >> root
    >> and typing grub with no arguments.
    >>
    >> --
    >> So far Iran has shown more willingness to help the US in Iraq than has
    >> Israel.
    >> -- The Iron Webmaster, 3735
    >> nizkorhttp://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    >> Mission Accomplishedhttp://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtmla12

    >
    > What kind of drives are these? If they're IDE, I've had *fascinating*
    > issues with the boot process of Linux detecting the wrong drive as /
    > dev/hda. And when you installed Linux, where did you put the boot
    > loader? On the Linux drive or the Windows drive?
    >




  5. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    Rubyxx wrote:

    > I just tried getting the bootloader to install on the C: drive but Fedora
    > sent an error message....probably because there is no space pre-allocated to
    > it on the C:drive.


    The bootloader goes in the master boot record, which is the first sector on
    drive C: You do not need to allocate space for this. What error messages are
    you getting?

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Telephone: (0121) 247 1596
    International: 0044 121 247 1596

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/


  6. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 01:27:14 +0100, Rubyxx wrote:

    > Hi ,
    >
    > I installed the bootloader and the full Linux install on a partition of the
    > D: drive . Windows does not recognize it, as existent. It has merely reduced
    > the apparent size of my D: drive from 186GB to 84GB.
    >
    > I have 2 IDE drives but faulty installation doesn't seem to be the main
    > issue here as as Windows still works perfectly. I simply cannot get the
    > invisible Linux booted.
    >
    > I just tried getting the bootloader to install on the C: drive but Fedora
    > sent an error message....probably because there is no space pre-allocated to
    > it on the C:drive.
    >
    > The problem seems to be either ...
    > 1. to find a way to get the Bios to optionally boot from the D: drive or
    > 2. to install the Linux bootloader in the main MBR on the C: drive and
    > configure it to boot the D: drive Linux installation.
    >
    > Unfortunately I don't have the technical savvy to work out a solution.
    >
    > Best Regards,
    > Rubyxx
    >
    > PS. I have an ASUS P4C800-E deluxe motherboard
    >

    Please, do not top post.

    Setup did exactly what you asked it to do. It placed the bootloader
    on the _partition_. That is not ideal in my experience for dual boot
    systems. I have had best luck using the bootloader installed at the MBR.
    When users are reluctant to make changes to their disk's MBR, I
    have advocated making a grub boot floppy or a grub boot CD. An
    external boot media is a compromise which allows a dual boot system to be
    made without touching the existing bootloader.

    Most modern GNU/Linux will make assumptions which allows setup to proceed
    without the user knowing what is being done for him "behind the scenes."
    If everything works right, the user is magically given a dual boot system
    at the conclusion of the setup process.

    Setup: "Presto! Dual boot system."

    I don't know why setup doesn't warn the user that installing the
    bootloader on the partition is not the best option. In the past, users
    were expected to know the details of disk layout (partitioning,
    bootloaders, etc.) These setup programs still defer to the end user's
    judgment for how the system will be started.

    Dual boot systems are a bit complicated. The "modern" approach taken by
    many GNU/Linux distribution's setup programs is faster and much less
    off-putting because the initial complexity is hidden from the start.
    But this approach doesn't do the user any favors in the long run,IMO,
    though. I think it is better to understand some basic principles before
    proceeding. But that leaves the user facing a bit of a learning curve.

    Here are two fact that I think you should be aware of:

    First, there is more than one bootloader. The bootloader you are
    using is the NT/XP bootloader. GNU/Linux can be booted using the NT/XP
    loader, but it's much more difficult, IME. I have strong preference for
    using the grub bootloader. One way to think about the grub bootloader is
    as a mini, self-contained OS whose job is to load other OSs. If you are
    also using the grub bootloader, then you should review the grub
    documentation. This is because it is easy for new users to break*
    something when setting up dual boot systems.

    Grub manual:
    http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html

    Second, each "OS" uses its own nomenclature for identifying drives
    and partitions on the same hardware platform. Windows uses C:, D:, etc.
    GNU/Linux uses /dev/hdxy, and grub uses (hdx,y). Using a "Mix and match"
    style among all of these nomenclature can get confusing. Context is
    important. For example, C: has no meaning in the GNU/Linux context. Since
    you are working with the bootloader, you should become familiar with the
    grub nomenclature.

    * All setup programs advise users to backup before starting to maintain a
    fallback position.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  7. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    I demand that Mark Hobley may or may not have written...

    > Rubyxx wrote:
    >> I just tried getting the bootloader to install on the C: drive but Fedora
    >> sent an error message....probably because there is no space pre-allocated
    >> to it on the C:drive.


    > The bootloader goes in the master boot record, which is the first sector on
    > drive C:


    And here's me thinking that "drive C:" was a partition...

    [snip]
    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    |

    You are dishonest, but never to the point of hurting a friend.

  8. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    Hi all,

    Thanks!

    I have finally setup my dual boot system.
    I had some problems after loading the GRUB to the MBR. Initially, it seemed
    to go straight to Fedora so I couldn't boot my Windows XP anymore.

    I was in a bit of a muddle, because the Fedora rescue disc did not seem to
    work. I had followed the instructions to use the chroot /mnt/sysimage and
    grub-install /dev/hda instructions, but they did not appear to make any
    difference

    I only figured out later by browsing the Internet that the problem was that
    the Grub was set to load Fedora by default very, very quickly. You have to
    press the down arrow on your keyboard pretty fast after system reboot or
    else it defaults to Fedora. I edited the Grub.conf time settings using
    Nano from 5 to 50 and it seems to work reasonably now.

    I still have problems now with my internet connection. I have to login as
    adminstrator to activate my ethernet connection, and I have some problems
    installing the NVIDIA driver, but that is another problem to be solved
    another day, perhaps.

    Perhaps the lesson I learnt from this is not to panic when things are going
    wrong. There are enough resources on the web to fix almost any problem. It
    is also very useful to have a Linux live CD ready for instant web access
    in the eventuality that the the newly installed system fails to boot
    properly.

    I wish I had known this earlier, when I quickly reinstalled Windows, after
    a few install problems, and lost all my files.

    Regards,

    Rubyxx
    "Douglas Mayne" wrote in message
    newsan.2007.04.27.13.52.00.856141@localhost.localnet.. .
    > On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 01:27:14 +0100, Rubyxx wrote:
    >
    >> Hi ,
    >>
    >> I installed the bootloader and the full Linux install on a partition of
    >> the
    >> D: drive . Windows does not recognize it, as existent. It has merely
    >> reduced
    >> the apparent size of my D: drive from 186GB to 84GB.
    >>
    >> I have 2 IDE drives but faulty installation doesn't seem to be the main
    >> issue here as as Windows still works perfectly. I simply cannot get the
    >> invisible Linux booted.
    >>
    >> I just tried getting the bootloader to install on the C: drive but Fedora
    >> sent an error message....probably because there is no space pre-allocated
    >> to
    >> it on the C:drive.
    >>
    >> The problem seems to be either ...
    >> 1. to find a way to get the Bios to optionally boot from the D: drive
    >> or
    >> 2. to install the Linux bootloader in the main MBR on the C: drive and
    >> configure it to boot the D: drive Linux installation.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately I don't have the technical savvy to work out a solution.
    >>
    >> Best Regards,
    >> Rubyxx
    >>
    >> PS. I have an ASUS P4C800-E deluxe motherboard
    >>

    > Please, do not top post.
    >
    > Setup did exactly what you asked it to do. It placed the bootloader
    > on the _partition_. That is not ideal in my experience for dual boot
    > systems. I have had best luck using the bootloader installed at the MBR.
    > When users are reluctant to make changes to their disk's MBR, I
    > have advocated making a grub boot floppy or a grub boot CD. An
    > external boot media is a compromise which allows a dual boot system to be
    > made without touching the existing bootloader.
    >
    > Most modern GNU/Linux will make assumptions which allows setup to proceed
    > without the user knowing what is being done for him "behind the scenes."
    > If everything works right, the user is magically given a dual boot system
    > at the conclusion of the setup process.
    >
    > Setup: "Presto! Dual boot system."
    >
    > I don't know why setup doesn't warn the user that installing the
    > bootloader on the partition is not the best option. In the past, users
    > were expected to know the details of disk layout (partitioning,
    > bootloaders, etc.) These setup programs still defer to the end user's
    > judgment for how the system will be started.
    >
    > Dual boot systems are a bit complicated. The "modern" approach taken by
    > many GNU/Linux distribution's setup programs is faster and much less
    > off-putting because the initial complexity is hidden from the start.
    > But this approach doesn't do the user any favors in the long run,IMO,
    > though. I think it is better to understand some basic principles before
    > proceeding. But that leaves the user facing a bit of a learning curve.
    >
    > Here are two fact that I think you should be aware of:
    >
    > First, there is more than one bootloader. The bootloader you are
    > using is the NT/XP bootloader. GNU/Linux can be booted using the NT/XP
    > loader, but it's much more difficult, IME. I have strong preference for
    > using the grub bootloader. One way to think about the grub bootloader is
    > as a mini, self-contained OS whose job is to load other OSs. If you are
    > also using the grub bootloader, then you should review the grub
    > documentation. This is because it is easy for new users to break*
    > something when setting up dual boot systems.
    >
    > Grub manual:
    > http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html
    >
    > Second, each "OS" uses its own nomenclature for identifying drives
    > and partitions on the same hardware platform. Windows uses C:, D:, etc.
    > GNU/Linux uses /dev/hdxy, and grub uses (hdx,y). Using a "Mix and match"
    > style among all of these nomenclature can get confusing. Context is
    > important. For example, C: has no meaning in the GNU/Linux context. Since
    > you are working with the bootloader, you should become familiar with the
    > grub nomenclature.
    >
    > * All setup programs advise users to backup before starting to maintain a
    > fallback position.
    >
    > --
    > Douglas Mayne




  9. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    Darren Salt wrote:

    > And here's me thinking that "drive C:" was a partition...


    Technically it is, but the user is not that technical. All he needs to do is
    install the bootloader onto the master boot record of the first drive.

    If this was LILO, I would have provided better notes.

    Regards,

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    393 Quinton Road West
    QUINTON
    Birmingham
    B32 1QE

    Telephone: (0121) 247 1596
    International: 0044 121 247 1596

    Email: markhobley at hotpop dot donottypethisbit com

    http://markhobley.yi.org/


  10. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    On 27 Apr, 14:52, Douglas Mayne wrote:

    > Setup did exactly what you asked it to do. It placed the bootloader
    > on the _partition_. That is not ideal in my experience for dual boot
    > systems. I have had best luck using the bootloader installed at the MBR.


    Actually, both is best.


  11. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 15:56:39 -0700, Gremnebulin wrote:

    > On 27 Apr, 14:52, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >
    >> Setup did exactly what you asked it to do. It placed the bootloader
    >> on the _partition_. That is not ideal in my experience for dual boot
    >> systems. I have had best luck using the bootloader installed at the MBR.

    >
    > Actually, both is best.
    >

    You are right. Both is best. One links to the other. The available space
    (<512 bytes) in the MBR is not sufficient to "learn" all of the possible
    filesystems, etc.

    Here is an example of why what you say is true. Without help from the
    code in MBR, grub cannot be installed on some filesystems:
    http://www.mail-archive.com/bug-grub.../msg10770.html

    And if you cannot install to both the MBR and partition, you are better
    off using an external boot media (cdrom or floppy). This leaves the BPB
    of the partition unchanged, and avoids possible damage. The benefit of
    external media is that once grub "learns" how to read filesystems and
    displays the menu or prompt, grub is fully functional. It can read the
    kernel and initrd from any partition with a filesystem that it "knows" how
    to read.

    --
    Douglas Mayne




  12. Re: newbie double boot install issues

    Yeah,

    I had the problem a second time. I had to reinstall Linux again after my
    upgraded Fedora SeLinux files got corrupted .

    The system froze and I rebooted by switching off and on the power switch.

    It took me a whole night to figure out that the resulting Grub 1.5 error
    messages , for my reinstalled OS, were a consequence of it being loaded onto
    the second harddrive rather than the first, even though I had already
    resolved this issue a few days earlier, during a previous install.

    Wish me luck! I have discovered that after recent software updates there is
    a brand new SeLinux installation upgrade to deal with. I hope that my files
    don't get corrupted again.

    I think Fedora should give extra coaching to people who have downloaded
    SeLinux files for the first time, because this extra security is almost like
    a whole new ballgame for the newbie.

    Regards,

    Rubyxx


    "Gremnebulin" wrote in message
    news:1177887399.686038.49450@n59g2000hsh.googlegro ups.com...
    > On 27 Apr, 14:52, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >
    >> Setup did exactly what you asked it to do. It placed the bootloader
    >> on the _partition_. That is not ideal in my experience for dual boot
    >> systems. I have had best luck using the bootloader installed at the MBR.

    >
    > Actually, both is best.
    >




+ Reply to Thread