Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse? - Setup

This is a discussion on Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse? - Setup ; I am running Suse 10.0 on a dual-boot with XP. I would like to install Mandriva 2007 to currently co-exist with Suse, and eventually replace it. For now, I need to be able to boot into either. Here is my ...

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Thread: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

  1. Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    I am running Suse 10.0 on a dual-boot with XP. I would like to install
    Mandriva 2007 to currently co-exist with Suse, and eventually replace
    it. For now, I need to be able to boot into either.

    Here is my current partition structure
    /dev/sda1 boot
    /dev/sda2 swap
    /dev/sda8 /home
    /dev/sda10 /usr
    /dev/sda11 /
    {other partitions omitted for clarity, XP is on a different device.]

    GRUB has menu.lst under /boot. For Suse, its entry is
    title Suse
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/sda11 vga=795 etc.

    I would like to have Mandriva as an additional menu option from the same
    GRUB menu, with its partitions as
    /dev/sda2 swap (same swap partition as Suse uses)
    /dev/sda16 /
    /dev/sda17 /usr
    /dev/sda18 /home

    with the new GRUB entry as follows
    title Mandrive 2007
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz /root=dev/sda16 vag=795 etc.

    Will this work?

    Thanks,

    Jim

  2. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 00:01:31 -0400, JimR wrote:
    > I am running Suse 10.0 on a dual-boot with XP. I would like to install
    > Mandriva 2007 to currently co-exist with Suse, and eventually replace
    > it. For now, I need to be able to boot into either.


    What you can do is during the Mandriva install you pick custom during
    the Partition phase, click the suse partition and mount it at /suse

    Later select grub as the boot loader, (lilo is default loader)

    Now you can cut the suse stanza from /suse/boot/grub/menu.lst and
    paste it into Mandriva's /boot/grub/menu.lst, change the title to suse.

    Next boot selection should work.

    Snippet from my multi-boot setup

    title /2007
    kernel (hd1,14)/boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sdb15 splash=0 vga=788
    initrd (hd1,14)/boot/initrd.img

    title /suse
    kernel (hd1,13)/boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sdb14 showopts selinux=0 resume=/dev/hdb1 splash=0 vga=0x31a
    initrd (hd1,13)/boot/initrd

    title /kubuntu
    kernel (hd1,9)/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.17-10-generic ro root=/dev/sdb10 vga=788
    initrd (hd1,9)/boot/initrd.img-2.6.17-10-generic

  3. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 00:01:31 -0400, JimR wrote:

    > I am running Suse 10.0 on a dual-boot with XP. I would like to install
    > Mandriva 2007 to currently co-exist with Suse, and eventually replace
    > it. For now, I need to be able to boot into either.
    >
    > Here is my current partition structure
    > /dev/sda1 boot
    > /dev/sda2 swap
    > /dev/sda8 /home
    > /dev/sda10 /usr
    > /dev/sda11 /
    > {other partitions omitted for clarity, XP is on a different device.]
    >
    > GRUB has menu.lst under /boot. For Suse, its entry is


    That should read /boot/grub/menu.lst

    > title Suse
    > root (hd0,0)
    > kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/sda11 vga=795 etc.
    >
    > I would like to have Mandriva as an additional menu option from the same
    > GRUB menu, with its partitions as
    > /dev/sda2 swap (same swap partition as Suse uses)
    > /dev/sda16 /
    > /dev/sda17 /usr
    > /dev/sda18 /home
    >
    > with the new GRUB entry as follows
    > title Mandrive 2007
    > root (hd0,0)
    > kernel /vmlinuz /root=dev/sda16 vag=795 etc.
    >
    > Will this work?


    Two flaws that I can see;

    Unless things have changed, SCSI allows only 15 partitions to a drive, and
    SATA is seen as SCSI, hence the sda designation.

    Both your SUSE, and Mandriva entries point to the same kernel, the SUSE
    one, so you'd have problems running Mandriva, as its modules would not
    work with the SUSE kernel.

    If you add another drive, you could install Mandriva to that drive. To do
    so, you should not mount sda1 as /boot, or you risk overwriting the SUSE
    kernel with the Mandriva one, or at least the vmlinuz link to the
    SUSE kernel, causing the reverse of the problem above.

    --
    imotgm
    "Lost? Lost? I've never been lost... Been a tad confused for a
    month or two, but never lost."



  4. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Thu, 29 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-

    >On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 00:01:31 -0400, JimR wrote:




    >> Here is my current partition structure
    >> /dev/sda1 boot
    >> /dev/sda2 swap
    >> /dev/sda8 /home
    >> /dev/sda10 /usr
    >> /dev/sda11 /




    >> /dev/sda2 swap (same swap partition as Suse uses)


    Not a good idea, unless you know you're never going to use "Suspend to
    disc" when you shut down.

    >> /dev/sda16 /
    >> /dev/sda17 /usr
    >> /dev/sda18 /home
    >>
    >> with the new GRUB entry as follows
    >> title Mandrive 2007
    >> root (hd0,0)
    >> kernel /vmlinuz /root=dev/sda16 vag=795 etc.
    >>
    >> Will this work?


    Not as you want it to do. SCSI devices, and SATA devices, are limited to
    15 partitions which means this partitioning won't work. To get your
    extra partitions, you're probably going to need to use LVM.

    >Two flaws that I can see;
    >
    >Unless things have changed, SCSI allows only 15 partitions to a drive, and
    >SATA is seen as SCSI, hence the sda designation.


    And it gets better. With openSUSE 10.3alhpa2, SUSE are moving to
    libata[0], which means IDE drives are no longer seen as hdx but as sdx.
    Unless you're using LVM, they also have a 15 partition per device limit.

    >Both your SUSE, and Mandriva entries point to the same kernel, the SUSE
    >one, so you'd have problems running Mandriva, as its modules would not
    >work with the SUSE kernel.


    No, they are separate kernels. The SUSE /boot is on the partition sda1
    while the Mandriva /boot is a part of /, which resides on sda16.

    >If you add another drive, you could install Mandriva to that drive. To do
    >so, you should not mount sda1 as /boot, or you risk overwriting the SUSE
    >kernel with the Mandriva one, or at least the vmlinuz link to the
    >SUSE kernel, causing the reverse of the problem above.


    Well, apart from misreading the partition used for Mandriva, your
    suggestion to use another drive for Mandriva is probably a good idea. If
    the OP doesn't want to, it should be possible to use the same /boot for
    both OSes, but it will need a little juggling of file names to ensure
    the kernel, initrd, etc. names are different.


    [0] And as a humorous side-note, my speel chucker doesn't like libata.
    It wants to change it to labia.

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    Member of Team Acorn checking nodes at 50 Mnodes/s: http://www.distributed.net/
    RISCOS 3.11 | SUSE 10.0 32bit | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit
    RISCOS 3.6 | SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit
    TOS 4.02 | SUSE 9.3 32bit | | openSUSE 10.3a1 32bit

  5. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 11:29:02 +0100, David Bolt wrote:

    >On Thu, 29 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-


    >>Both your SUSE, and Mandriva entries point to the same kernel, the SUSE
    >>one, so you'd have problems running Mandriva, as its modules would not
    >>work with the SUSE kernel.

    >
    > No, they are separate kernels. The SUSE /boot is on the partition sda1
    > while the Mandriva /boot is a part of /, which resides on sda16.


    Not according to OP.

    GRUB has menu.lst under /boot. For Suse, its entry is
    title Suse
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/sda11 vga=795 etc.

    with the new GRUB entry as follows
    title Mandrive 2007
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz /root=dev/sda16 vag=795 etc.

    Both call for "root (hd0,0)" and "kernel /vmlinuz", which means they both
    use the same kernel. Having different / partitions means one or the other
    will have a mismatch with /lib/modules, and also kernel sources in
    /usr/src/linux, which won't help a bit with Nvidia or ATI driver
    compilation.

    >>If you add another drive, you could install Mandriva to that drive. To
    >>do so, you should not mount sda1 as /boot, or you risk overwriting the
    >>SUSE kernel with the Mandriva one, or at least the vmlinuz link to the
    >>SUSE kernel, causing the reverse of the problem above.


    > Well, apart from misreading the partition used for Mandriva, your


    Who misread the partition used for Mandriva?

    > suggestion to use another drive for Mandriva is probably a good idea. If
    > the OP doesn't want to, it should be possible to use the same /boot for
    > both OSes, but it will need a little juggling of file names to ensure
    > the kernel, initrd, etc. names are different.


    Actually, I use the same boot partition for a number of OS installs. I
    just never mount it. I have kernel entries;

    kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.0/vmlinuz root=...
    kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.1/vmlinuz root=...
    kernel (hd0,0)/man2007/vmlinuz root=...

    with corresponding initrd entries in my menu.lst stanzas. Each OS has a
    directory with its name on it that contains the kernel, initrd,
    System.map, etc. that goes with that OS.

    > [0] And as a humorous side-note, my speel chucker doesn't like libata.
    > It wants to change it to labia.


    My mind always does that.

    --
    imotgm
    "Lost? Lost? I've never been lost... Been a tad confused for a
    month or two, but never lost."



  6. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Thu, 29 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-

    >On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 11:29:02 +0100, David Bolt wrote:
    >



    >Both call for "root (hd0,0)" and "kernel /vmlinuz",


    Oops. I missed that part.

    >which means they both
    >use the same kernel. Having different / partitions means one or the other
    >will have a mismatch with /lib/modules, and also kernel sources in
    >/usr/src/linux, which won't help a bit with Nvidia or ATI driver
    >compilation.


    Well, without some manual editing, and file renaming, it will work. Mush
    simpler to use another drive.

    >>>If you add another drive, you could install Mandriva to that drive. To
    >>>do so, you should not mount sda1 as /boot, or you risk overwriting the
    >>>SUSE kernel with the Mandriva one, or at least the vmlinuz link to the
    >>>SUSE kernel, causing the reverse of the problem above.

    >
    >> Well, apart from misreading the partition used for Mandriva, your

    >
    >Who misread the partition used for Mandriva?


    That would be me

    >> suggestion to use another drive for Mandriva is probably a good idea. If
    >> the OP doesn't want to, it should be possible to use the same /boot for
    >> both OSes, but it will need a little juggling of file names to ensure
    >> the kernel, initrd, etc. names are different.

    >
    >Actually, I use the same boot partition for a number of OS installs. I
    >just never mount it. I have kernel entries;
    >
    > kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.0/vmlinuz root=...
    > kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.1/vmlinuz root=...
    > kernel (hd0,0)/man2007/vmlinuz root=...
    >
    >with corresponding initrd entries in my menu.lst stanzas. Each OS has a
    >directory with its name on it that contains the kernel, initrd,
    >System.map, etc. that goes with that OS.


    There's another method which would work just as well. It would still
    need some manual configuration because the default for GRUB-based
    loaders is /boot/grub/

    >> [0] And as a humorous side-note, my speel chucker doesn't like libata.
    >> It wants to change it to labia.

    >
    >My mind always does that.


    Probably explains my own misreading of things as well


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    Member of Team Acorn checking nodes at 50 Mnodes/s: http://www.distributed.net/
    RISCOS 3.11 | SUSE 10.0 32bit | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit
    RISCOS 3.6 | SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit
    TOS 4.02 | SUSE 9.3 32bit | | openSUSE 10.3a2 32bit

  7. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 19:19:27 +0100, David Bolt wrote:

    > On Thu, 29 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-


    >>Actually, I use the same boot partition for a number of OS installs. I
    >>just never mount it. I have kernel entries;
    >>
    >> kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.0/vmlinuz root=...
    >> kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.1/vmlinuz root=...
    >> kernel (hd0,0)/man2007/vmlinuz root=...
    >>
    >>with corresponding initrd entries in my menu.lst stanzas. Each OS has a
    >>directory with its name on it that contains the kernel, initrd,
    >>System.map, etc. that goes with that OS.

    >
    > There's another method which would work just as well. It would still
    > need some manual configuration because the default for GRUB-based
    > loaders is /boot/grub/


    Do you have a separate /boot partition? If it was made by SUSE, it has a
    link to ./ that is named boot, for just that reason. With /dev/hda1
    mounted at /mnt/boot;

    fatman:~ # ls -l /mnt/boot |grep boot
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 Apr 28 2003 boot -> ./

    Grub can either call /grub/menu.lst, or /boot/grub/menu.lst to get the
    same file on (hd0,0). It can also call the / partition of each OS, and
    search for /boot/grub/*, but when addressing the unmounted (hd0,0) it
    calls /grub/menu.lst, without the /boot. I noticed this right off when I
    first installed grub from SuSE 7.2. Even though (hd0,0) was mounted on
    /boot, menu.lst showed (hd0,0)/grub, (hd0,0)/vmlinuz, (hd0,0)/initrd,
    without the reference to /boot. I deleted the reference to /boot in
    /etc/fstab so it wouldn't mount, and couldn't be overwritten, and have run
    that way ever since.

    When I add a new OS, I usually don't install grub. If the Installation
    wont allow that, I install grub to a floppy. I boot my main OS,
    mount /dev/hda1, mount the new OS /, and copy the contents of it's /boot
    into a new directory on /dev/hda1. I then write a stanza in /grub/menu.lst
    pointing to the contents of that directory, as well as enter the
    root=/hd(x)(n) for the appropriate / partition. I make a second stanza
    that points to the / partition's /boot, so that I can boot from either the
    (hd0,0)//vmlinuz, or the (hdx,n)/boot/vmlinuz. Next boot I can
    choose the new OS. On the OSs that I installed grub to a floppy, there's a
    /boot/grub directory, so I copy the main menu.lst to each of those. In
    case of damage to the (hd0,0) partition, I have four backups I can fall
    back on.

    Each OS can overwrite the contents of its /boot directory, possibly with
    a bad kernel built, or bad menu.lst entries, as SUSE did on the last 10.2
    update. When that happens, I always have the working kernels, and menu.lst
    safely tucked away on the unmounted (hd0,0). After testing, to make sure
    all is well, I can copy the newest update to (hd0,0), minus the screw-ups.

    >>> [0] And as a humorous side-note, my speel chucker doesn't like libata.
    >>> It wants to change it to labia.

    >>
    >>My mind always does that.

    >
    > Probably explains my own misreading of things as well


    I'll buy that. No argument here, at all.

    --
    imotgm
    "Lost? Lost? I've never been lost... Been a tad confused for a
    month or two, but never lost."



  8. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    On Fri, 30 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-



    >Do you have a separate /boot partition?


    I've always have had one on all the systems I've used. This includes the
    dual-boot systems, where I've had to use Partition Magic to shift the
    Windows partitions so I could slip 30-40MB boot partition at the
    beginning of the disc.

    >If it was made by SUSE, it has a
    >link to ./ that is named boot, for just that reason.


    Strange. I've never actually noticed that.

    >With /dev/hda1
    >mounted at /mnt/boot;
    >
    >fatman:~ # ls -l /mnt/boot |grep boot
    >lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 Apr 28 2003 boot -> ./
    >
    >Grub can either call /grub/menu.lst, or /boot/grub/menu.lst to get the
    >same file on (hd0,0). It can also call the / partition of each OS, and
    >search for /boot/grub/*, but when addressing the unmounted (hd0,0) it
    >calls /grub/menu.lst, without the /boot. I noticed this right off when I
    >first installed grub from SuSE 7.2. Even though (hd0,0) was mounted on
    >/boot, menu.lst showed (hd0,0)/grub, (hd0,0)/vmlinuz, (hd0,0)/initrd,
    >without the reference to /boot. I deleted the reference to /boot in
    >/etc/fstab so it wouldn't mount, and couldn't be overwritten, and have run
    >that way ever since.


    My preference is to have /boot mounted read-only, and when I need to
    perform a kernel update, remount it read-write. Interestingly, when I
    made changes to the menu.lst without making /boot RW, I noticed that
    YaST didn't always complain about not being able to write changes. I'll
    have to have a test run with a missing /boot, just to see the effects.



    >Each OS can overwrite the contents of its /boot directory, possibly with
    >a bad kernel built, or bad menu.lst entries, as SUSE did on the last 10.2
    >update.


    As luck has it, I've not yet had that problem[0]. It will be interesting
    to see just what the cause was.

    >When that happens, I always have the working kernels, and menu.lst
    >safely tucked away on the unmounted (hd0,0). After testing, to make sure
    >all is well, I can copy the newest update to (hd0,0), minus the screw-ups.


    :-)


    [0] I'll see later if I get bitten as I've had to perform a fresh
    install of my virtual 10.2 system because I deleted the wrong virtual
    hard drive while doing a clean-up :-(

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    Member of Team Acorn checking nodes at 50 Mnodes/s: http://www.distributed.net/
    RISCOS 3.11 | SUSE 10.0 32bit | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit
    RISCOS 3.6 | SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit
    TOS 4.02 | SUSE 9.3 32bit | | openSUSE 10.3a2 32bit

  9. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    imotgm wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 19:19:27 +0100, David Bolt wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 29 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-

    >
    >>> Actually, I use the same boot partition for a number of OS installs. I
    >>> just never mount it. I have kernel entries;
    >>>
    >>> kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.0/vmlinuz root=...
    >>> kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.1/vmlinuz root=...
    >>> kernel (hd0,0)/man2007/vmlinuz root=...
    >>>
    >>> with corresponding initrd entries in my menu.lst stanzas. Each OS has a
    >>> directory with its name on it that contains the kernel, initrd,
    >>> System.map, etc. that goes with that OS.

    >> There's another method which would work just as well. It would still
    >> need some manual configuration because the default for GRUB-based
    >> loaders is /boot/grub/

    >
    > Do you have a separate /boot partition? If it was made by SUSE, it has a
    > link to ./ that is named boot, for just that reason. With /dev/hda1
    > mounted at /mnt/boot;


    Yes, I created a separate small boot partition based on my early
    reading, suggesting that the boot partition should be in the
    low-numbered sectors of the hard drive.

    It is at
    /dev/sda1 and is only 250 MB. It indeed has a link to ./ that is named
    boot. (FYI, hda is the SECONDARY drive, and has only Windoze stuff).
    boot has the Suse vmlinuz-2.6.15 ... as well as a symlink to same called
    vmlinuz. There is also a subdirectory grub/ which includes menu.lst and
    all of the stage stuff.

    >
    > fatman:~ # ls -l /mnt/boot |grep boot
    > lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 Apr 28 2003 boot -> ./
    >
    > Grub can either call /grub/menu.lst, or /boot/grub/menu.lst to get the
    > same file on (hd0,0). It can also call the / partition of each OS, and
    > search for /boot/grub/*, but when addressing the unmounted (hd0,0) it
    > calls /grub/menu.lst, without the /boot. I noticed this right off when I
    > first installed grub from SuSE 7.2. Even though (hd0,0) was mounted on
    > /boot, menu.lst showed (hd0,0)/grub, (hd0,0)/vmlinuz, (hd0,0)/initrd,
    > without the reference to /boot. I deleted the reference to /boot in
    > /etc/fstab so it wouldn't mount, and couldn't be overwritten, and have run
    > that way ever since.
    >
    > When I add a new OS, I usually don't install grub. If the Installation
    > wont allow that, I install grub to a floppy. I boot my main OS,
    > mount /dev/hda1, mount the new OS /, and copy the contents of it's /boot
    > into a new directory on /dev/hda1. I then write a stanza in /grub/menu.lst
    > pointing to the contents of that directory, as well as enter the
    > root=/hd(x)(n) for the appropriate / partition. I make a second stanza
    > that points to the / partition's /boot, so that I can boot from either the
    > (hd0,0)//vmlinuz, or the (hdx,n)/boot/vmlinuz. Next boot I can
    > choose the new OS. On the OSs that I installed grub to a floppy, there's a
    > /boot/grub directory, so I copy the main menu.lst to each of those. In
    > case of damage to the (hd0,0) partition, I have four backups I can fall
    > back on.
    >
    > Each OS can overwrite the contents of its /boot directory, possibly with
    > a bad kernel built, or bad menu.lst entries, as SUSE did on the last 10.2
    > update. When that happens, I always have the working kernels, and menu.lst
    > safely tucked away on the unmounted (hd0,0). After testing, to make sure
    > all is well, I can copy the newest update to (hd0,0), minus the screw-ups.
    >


    This sounds like a viable option. I believe I will try that, perhaps on
    Saturday.

    >>>> [0] And as a humorous side-note, my speel chucker doesn't like libata.
    >>>> It wants to change it to labia.
    >>> My mind always does that.

    >> Probably explains my own misreading of things as well

    >
    > I'll buy that. No argument here, at all.
    >


    Wish I had a spell checker like that -- mine gives celibacy as an
    option, but I reject that!


    Thanks,
    Jim

  10. Re: Can new Mandriva install co-exist in GRUB with Suse?

    imotgm wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 19:19:27 +0100, David Bolt wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 29 Mar 2007, imotgm wrote:-

    >
    >>> Actually, I use the same boot partition for a number of OS installs. I
    >>> just never mount it. I have kernel entries;
    >>>
    >>> kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.0/vmlinuz root=...
    >>> kernel (hd0,0)/suse10.1/vmlinuz root=...
    >>> kernel (hd0,0)/man2007/vmlinuz root=...
    >>>
    >>> with corresponding initrd entries in my menu.lst stanzas. Each OS has a
    >>> directory with its name on it that contains the kernel, initrd,
    >>> System.map, etc. that goes with that OS.

    >> There's another method which would work just as well. It would still
    >> need some manual configuration because the default for GRUB-based
    >> loaders is /boot/grub/

    >
    > Do you have a separate /boot partition? If it was made by SUSE, it has a
    > link to ./ that is named boot, for just that reason. With /dev/hda1
    > mounted at /mnt/boot;


    Yes, I created a separate small boot partition based on my early
    reading, suggesting that the boot partition should be in the
    low-numbered sectors of the hard drive.

    It is at
    /dev/sda1 and is only 250 MB. It indeed has a link to ./ that is named
    boot. (FYI, hda is the SECONDARY drive, and has only Windoze stuff).
    boot has the Suse vmlinuz-2.6.15 ... as well as a symlink to same called
    vmlinuz. There is also a subdirectory grub/ which includes menu.lst and
    all of the stage stuff.

    >
    > fatman:~ # ls -l /mnt/boot |grep boot
    > lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 Apr 28 2003 boot -> ./
    >
    > Grub can either call /grub/menu.lst, or /boot/grub/menu.lst to get the
    > same file on (hd0,0). It can also call the / partition of each OS, and
    > search for /boot/grub/*, but when addressing the unmounted (hd0,0) it
    > calls /grub/menu.lst, without the /boot. I noticed this right off when I
    > first installed grub from SuSE 7.2. Even though (hd0,0) was mounted on
    > /boot, menu.lst showed (hd0,0)/grub, (hd0,0)/vmlinuz, (hd0,0)/initrd,
    > without the reference to /boot. I deleted the reference to /boot in
    > /etc/fstab so it wouldn't mount, and couldn't be overwritten, and have run
    > that way ever since.
    >
    > When I add a new OS, I usually don't install grub. If the Installation
    > wont allow that, I install grub to a floppy. I boot my main OS,
    > mount /dev/hda1, mount the new OS /, and copy the contents of it's /boot
    > into a new directory on /dev/hda1. I then write a stanza in /grub/menu.lst
    > pointing to the contents of that directory, as well as enter the
    > root=/hd(x)(n) for the appropriate / partition. I make a second stanza
    > that points to the / partition's /boot, so that I can boot from either the
    > (hd0,0)//vmlinuz, or the (hdx,n)/boot/vmlinuz. Next boot I can
    > choose the new OS. On the OSs that I installed grub to a floppy, there's a
    > /boot/grub directory, so I copy the main menu.lst to each of those. In
    > case of damage to the (hd0,0) partition, I have four backups I can fall
    > back on.
    >
    > Each OS can overwrite the contents of its /boot directory, possibly with
    > a bad kernel built, or bad menu.lst entries, as SUSE did on the last 10.2
    > update. When that happens, I always have the working kernels, and menu.lst
    > safely tucked away on the unmounted (hd0,0). After testing, to make sure
    > all is well, I can copy the newest update to (hd0,0), minus the screw-ups.
    >


    This sounds like a viable option. I believe I will try that, perhaps on
    Saturday.

    >>>> [0] And as a humorous side-note, my speel chucker doesn't like libata.
    >>>> It wants to change it to labia.
    >>> My mind always does that.

    >> Probably explains my own misreading of things as well

    >
    > I'll buy that. No argument here, at all.
    >


    Wish I had a spell checker like that -- mine gives celibacy as an
    option, but I reject that!


    Thanks,
    Jim

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