How to avoid login.... - Setup

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  1. How to avoid login....

    How can I avoid any kind of log in with SUSE 10.2?

    Many thanks,

    Alan Moorman


  2. Re: How to avoid login....

    Alan Moorman wrote:
    > How can I avoid any kind of log in with SUSE 10.2?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    >
    > Alan Moorman
    >


    If you're talking about a KDE session, then you can
    go to Configure Desktop (Personal Settings) ->
    System Administration -> Login Manager
    (click button for Administrator Mode and enter
    the root password) and click on the Convenience
    tab and Enable Auto-Login for a particular username.

    If you are wanting a shell (non-graphical), it can
    be done as well... a bit trickier.... however
    only do these things if security isn't important
    to you at all.


  3. Re: How to avoid login....

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 13:16:01 -0600, Chris Cox
    wrote:

    >Alan Moorman wrote:
    >> How can I avoid any kind of log in with SUSE 10.2?
    >>
    >> Many thanks,
    >>
    >> Alan Moorman
    >>

    >
    >If you're talking about a KDE session, then you can
    >go to Configure Desktop (Personal Settings) ->
    >System Administration -> Login Manager
    >(click button for Administrator Mode and enter
    >the root password) and click on the Convenience
    >tab and Enable Auto-Login for a particular username.
    >
    >If you are wanting a shell (non-graphical), it can
    >be done as well... a bit trickier.... however
    >only do these things if security isn't important
    >to you at all.


    Well, yeah, I think security isn't important, as in another
    person using the computer.

    I am the administrator, and the only user.

    However, I'm a newbie to Linux, and don't know what a "KDE
    session" is/means.....

    Alan

  4. Re: How to avoid login....

    Alan Moorman wrote:

    > How can I avoid any kind of log in with SUSE 10.2?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    >
    > Alan Moorman


    Turn the computer off.

    --
    Dancin in the ruins tonight
    Tayo'y Mga Pinoy

  5. Re: How to avoid login....

    Alan Moorman wrote:
    > On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 13:16:01 -0600, Chris Cox
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Alan Moorman wrote:
    >>> How can I avoid any kind of log in with SUSE 10.2?
    >>>
    >>> Many thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Alan Moorman
    >>>

    >> If you're talking about a KDE session, then you can
    >> go to Configure Desktop (Personal Settings) ->
    >> System Administration -> Login Manager
    >> (click button for Administrator Mode and enter
    >> the root password) and click on the Convenience
    >> tab and Enable Auto-Login for a particular username.
    >>
    >> If you are wanting a shell (non-graphical), it can
    >> be done as well... a bit trickier.... however
    >> only do these things if security isn't important
    >> to you at all.

    >
    > Well, yeah, I think security isn't important, as in another
    > person using the computer.
    >
    > I am the administrator, and the only user.
    >
    > However, I'm a newbie to Linux, and don't know what a "KDE
    > session" is/means.....


    Well, it means that you're running KDE as your primary
    desktop instead of Gnome. Both are available in
    openSUSE... you choose at install time which one you
    prefer.

    If you have a button on the lower left (assuming openSUSE 10.2)
    that looks like a lizard and hoevering over it produces
    a message about it being Kmenu... then you have a KDE
    desktop.

    If you open up the KMenu (click on the lizard) you will
    see one of the items under the Favorites tab is
    Configure Desktop.

    Before I can help futher, you need to see if you're
    running KDE... if it's not KDE, then you're likely
    running Gnome. I haven't done an auto-login with
    Gnome.. somebody else may have to post instructions
    for that.

  6. Re: How to avoid login....

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 18:58:48 -0600, Chris Cox
    wrote:

    >Alan Moorman wrote:
    >> On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 13:16:01 -0600, Chris Cox
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Alan Moorman wrote:
    >>>> How can I avoid any kind of log in with SUSE 10.2?
    >>>>
    >>>> Many thanks,
    >>>>
    >>>> Alan Moorman
    >>>>
    >>> If you're talking about a KDE session, then you can
    >>> go to Configure Desktop (Personal Settings) ->
    >>> System Administration -> Login Manager
    >>> (click button for Administrator Mode and enter
    >>> the root password) and click on the Convenience
    >>> tab and Enable Auto-Login for a particular username.
    >>>
    >>> If you are wanting a shell (non-graphical), it can
    >>> be done as well... a bit trickier.... however
    >>> only do these things if security isn't important
    >>> to you at all.

    >>
    >> Well, yeah, I think security isn't important, as in another
    >> person using the computer.
    >>
    >> I am the administrator, and the only user.
    >>
    >> However, I'm a newbie to Linux, and don't know what a "KDE
    >> session" is/means.....

    >
    >Well, it means that you're running KDE as your primary
    >desktop instead of Gnome. Both are available in
    >openSUSE... you choose at install time which one you
    >prefer.
    >
    >If you have a button on the lower left (assuming openSUSE 10.2)
    >that looks like a lizard and hoevering over it produces
    >a message about it being Kmenu... then you have a KDE
    >desktop.
    >
    >If you open up the KMenu (click on the lizard) you will
    >see one of the items under the Favorites tab is
    >Configure Desktop.
    >
    >Before I can help futher, you need to see if you're
    >running KDE... if it's not KDE, then you're likely
    >running Gnome. I haven't done an auto-login with
    >Gnome.. somebody else may have to post instructions
    >for that.


    Thanks! I figured out that I'm using Gnome. . .

    Alan Moorman

  7. Re: How to avoid login....

    >>>>> "Alan" == Alan Moorman writes:

    Alan> Well, yeah, I think security isn't important, as in another
    Alan> person using the computer.

    Typical newbie mindset. But when you realize that security IS
    important, it'd be too late. You'd better stay with the current
    security model during your learning. There ARE reasons most Linux
    distributions (and unix installations) are the way they are. That's
    more than 30 years of experience accumulated. Not something that a
    newbie can fully understand in 3 days.


    Alan> I am the administrator, and the only user.

    In unix (and other serious OSes), the administrator usually log in as
    an unprivileged user, switching to "administrator mode" only when the
    occasional necessity arises. This is something you as a newbie should
    learn. Why? There are strong reasons. e.g. to prevent you from
    accidently doing a "rm -rf /" or "dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda" or
    something like that.



    Alan> However, I'm a newbie to Linux, and don't know what a "KDE
    Alan> session" is/means.....

    If you're a newbie, you'd better leave the machine with the current
    settings and stay with it until you've learnt enough to do something
    differently. It's possible to do what you want, but you're not ready
    for it. (You should know how to do it when your Linux skills are
    "mature" enough.)


    --
    Lee Sau Dan u ~{@nJX6X~}

    E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

  8. Re: How to avoid login....

    LEE Sau Dan writes:

    >>>>>> "Alan" =3D=3D Alan Moorman writes:


    > Alan> Well, yeah, I think security isn't important, as in another
    > Alan> person using the computer.


    Unfortunately that is just not true. You are almost certainly networking
    the computer. That means you have 8 billion other users, many of whom might
    want to use your machine.

    And what in the world is so difficult about logging in? Just type your
    password.


    >Typical newbie mindset. But when you realize that security IS
    >important, it'd be too late. You'd better stay with the current
    >security model during your learning. There ARE reasons most Linux
    >distributions (and unix installations) are the way they are. That's
    >more than 30 years of experience accumulated. Not something that a
    >newbie can fully understand in 3 days.



    > Alan> I am the administrator, and the only user.


    >In unix (and other serious OSes), the administrator usually log in as
    >an unprivileged user, switching to "administrator mode" only when the
    >occasional necessity arises. This is something you as a newbie should
    >learn. Why? There are strong reasons. e.g. to prevent you from
    >accidently doing a "rm -rf /" or "dd if=3D/dev/zero of=3D/dev/hda" or
    >something like that.




    > Alan> However, I'm a newbie to Linux, and don't know what a "KDE
    > Alan> session" is/means.....


    KDE is the window manager-- the thing that puts up all those little icons
    and windows on your desktop and lets you click on an icon to run a program.
    Running KDE is what is called a KDE session. You run it eitehr using startx
    or it automatically is run during your boot sequence.

    >If you're a newbie, you'd better leave the machine with the current
    >settings and stay with it until you've learnt enough to do something
    >differently. It's possible to do what you want, but you're not ready
    >for it. (You should know how to do it when your Linux skills are
    >"mature" enough.)


    I agree. I have no idea what is so hard about typing in a password.



    >--=20
    >Lee Sau Dan =A7=F5=A6u=B4=B0 ~=
    >{@nJX6X~}


    >E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    >Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee


  9. Re: How to avoid login....

    > I agree. I have no idea what is so hard about typing in a password.
    >


    I run a second networked box with vnc from my main workstation. This
    box does video rendering (distributed rendering with cinelerra), video
    encoding with mencoder, and whatever else I want without tying up my
    main workstation cpu, memory and disks. I've disconnect the monitor
    from this box to save space. Which makes logging in tricky (the vnc /
    vino doesn't begin operating until gnome login). An automatic login
    to a normal user on gnome would be very handy. I could then
    disconnect the extra keyboard and mouse too...

    Not sure about the security issues involved though.

    So this is just to say that in my case "what is so hard about typing
    in a password" has a valid answer. I would eventually like to have
    more of these 'blind boxes' going as a render-farm for hdv video
    encoding on cinelerra.

    Graham E


  10. Re: How to avoid login....

    >>>>> "gray" == gray writes:

    gray> I've disconnect the monitor from
    gray> this box to save space. Which makes logging in tricky (the
    gray> vnc / vino doesn't begin operating until gnome login).

    You're finally asking the appropriate question.

    What you want is to get a remote desktop without *CONSOLE* login. The
    appropriate way to do it is:n

    Arrange your machine to start, upon booting, an Xvnc server and start
    a gnome xdm to manage it. Then, you get a normal gnome login screen
    in your VNC client. And you still still need to type in username and
    password in that genome login screen.

    So, you don't avoid login. You just arrange an Xvnc server to be
    started upon booting. And that can be done via the config file of
    "gdm". Try to find it under /etc. It's location varies from distro
    to distro. You need to add one more X server to gdm.conf, and specify
    that "Xvnc" be used as the server program. Give it its own display
    number, e.g. :5.


    gray> An automatic login to a normal user on gnome would be very
    gray> handy. I could then disconnect the extra keyboard and mouse
    gray> too...

    What you want is not automatic login, but automatic starting of an
    Xvnc with a genome login screen.




    --
    Lee Sau Dan u ~{@nJX6X~}

    E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

  11. Re: How to avoid login....

    >>>>> "gray" == gray writes:

    >> I agree. I have no idea what is so hard about typing in a
    >> password.


    gray> I run a second networked box with vnc from my main
    gray> workstation. This box does video rendering (distributed
    gray> rendering with cinelerra), video encoding with mencoder, and
    gray> whatever else I want without tying up my main workstation
    gray> cpu, memory and disks.

    But why do you need VNC? X11 programs can happily display remotely,
    and if you do it via ssh X11-forwarding, it's secured.

    Try this command from your box with monitor and keyboard:

    $ ssh -X -f my_acc@the_rendering_host xterm

    to see if you can get an 'xterm' that is running on
    the_rendering_machine but displayed on your local monitor. You can
    then start other programs from that xterm (including further xterms)
    and start working. No need to go around the VNC path. (VNC is not as
    efficient as native X11.)


    --
    Lee Sau Dan u ~{@nJX6X~}

    E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

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