Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB? - Setup

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Thread: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

  1. Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    Thank you.


  2. Re: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 15:46:18 -0800, Scott Simpson wrote:

    > Thank you.

    Q. Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    A. Yes. For best results, install grub's "stage 1" in the MBR.

    Are you having some difficulty with an existing setup, or are you planning
    your partition layout?

    More info...
    Once grub is loaded, it can read all of the filesystems it has been
    compiled with. For example, it can read partitions which contain different
    GNU/Linux distributions.

    Grub is installed, per the usual drill:

    # grub --no-floppy
    grub> root (hdx,y)
    grub> setup (hdx)
    grub> quit

    Note: Substitute values appropriate for your system. Be extra careful when
    changing the bootloader, or working directly with partitions.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  3. Re: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    Scott Simpson wrote:
    >
    > Thank you.


    You're welcome. For what?

    --
    Some informative links:
    (newusers)



    (taming google)



  4. Re: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    Douglas Mayne wrote:

    > On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 15:46:18 -0800, Scott Simpson wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you.

    > Q. Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?
    >
    > A. Yes. For best results, install grub's "stage 1" in the MBR.
    >
    > Are you having some difficulty with an existing setup, or are you planning
    > your partition layout?


    I'm planning my partition layout. I just ordered a Lenovo notebook. I assume
    it will come with

    partition 1: hibernate partition
    partition 2: windows xp

    I plan on shrinking windows XP and putting Linux root on partition 3. I'll
    make partition 4 extended and create a swap partition in it. Also, I'd like
    to experiment with other Linux distributions so I'd like to put another
    Linux root in the extended partition. That is why I want to know if grub
    can boot off it. Thank you.

    > More info...
    > Once grub is loaded, it can read all of the filesystems it has been
    > compiled with. For example, it can read partitions which contain different
    > GNU/Linux distributions.
    >
    > Grub is installed, per the usual drill:
    >
    > # grub --no-floppy
    > grub> root (hdx,y)
    > grub> setup (hdx)
    > grub> quit
    >
    > Note: Substitute values appropriate for your system. Be extra careful when
    > changing the bootloader, or working directly with partitions.



  5. Re: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    On 2006-12-31, Scott Simpson wrote:

    You can boot linux from a logical partition contained within an extended
    partition, if that's what you're asking.

    --

    John (john@os2.dhs.org)

  6. Re: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    John Thompson wrote:

    > On 2006-12-31, Scott Simpson wrote:
    >
    > You can boot linux from a logical partition contained within an extended
    > partition, if that's what you're asking.
    >


    That's what I'm asking. Danka shoen.


  7. Re: Is it possible to boot Linux off an extended partition using GRUB?

    Scott Simpson wrote:

    > I'm planning my partition layout. I just ordered a Lenovo notebook. I
    > assume it will come with
    >
    > partition 1: hibernate partition
    > partition 2: windows xp
    >
    > I plan on shrinking windows XP and putting Linux root on partition 3. I'll
    > make partition 4 extended and create a swap partition in it. Also, I'd
    > like to experiment with other Linux distributions so I'd like to put
    > another Linux root in the extended partition. That is why I want to know
    > if grub can boot off it. Thank you.


    I'd be much more inclined to have a small boot partition /boot on hda3,
    and have the root partition / on an extended partition.
    Then if you try other distributions they can share the same /boot .

    --
    Timothy Murphy
    e-mail (<80k only): tim /at/ birdsnest.maths.tcd.ie
    tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
    s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

  8. Linux and OS/2 together...

    I would like to install software in the following order:

    Bootmanager (eCS or Grub?...)
    eCS - first winchester (HPFS)
    Linux (Ubuntu 6.10) - first winchester (ext3)
    Linux swap - first winchester
    Comon data - first winchester (FAT32)
    eCS users programs - second winchester (JFS)
    eCS data - second winchester (JFS)

    1. winchester 40GB
    2. winchester 80GB

    How do I go about doing this?

    csola

  9. Re: Linux and OS/2 together...

    On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 16:58:22 +0100, csola wrote:

    > I would like to install software in the following order:
    >
    > Bootmanager (eCS or Grub?...)
    > eCS - first winchester (HPFS)
    > Linux (Ubuntu 6.10) - first winchester (ext3)
    > Linux swap - first winchester
    > Comon data - first winchester (FAT32)
    > eCS users programs - second winchester (JFS)
    > eCS data - second winchester (JFS)
    >
    > 1. winchester 40GB
    > 2. winchester 80GB
    >
    > How do I go about doing this?
    >
    > csola
    >

    Caveat: I am not running OS/2 or Ubuntu.

    I recommend the grub bootloader because it is a very flexible bootloader.
    First, realize that grub is not tied to any one OS. It can be thought of
    as a self-contained, mini-OS whose job is to load other OSs. A quick
    review of the grub manual is a good starting point:
    http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html

    You also need to know he partitioning rules in the PC world. Here is a
    quick summary of the basic rules for disc partitioning (in the PC world):
    1. There can be a maximum of 4 primary partitions.
    2. Windows likes to be on partition 1.
    3. A primary partition can be assigned to be an "extended partition."
    4. An extended partiton can contain more partition entries
    (not limited to 4).
    4.A. Partitions within the extended partition are referred
    to as "logical partitions."
    4.B. The first logical partition is always the number 5
    because the first 4 numbers are reserved for primary
    partitions.

    Also, keep in mind that grub counts devices and partitions
    starting at zero. Most OSs begin counting with 1.

    Lay out your partitioning plans and boot strategy on paper before
    starting. You can then use the paper as a checklist as you proceed with
    through the various setup. Grub is a flexible bootloader, but it doesn't
    read HPFS directly (AFAIK). However, you should be able to chainload to
    the bootstrap code, because it is similar to NTFS (AFAIK). Let's skip that
    for now. Here is a plan for a common dual boot setup (using IDE devices)

    Location Grub nomen Used For Size or % Comments
    MBR (hd0) bootstrap 512b Use grub
    hda1 (hd0,0) OS/2 ?
    hda2 (hd0,1) Ubuntu ? grub "lives" here also
    hda3 (hd0,2) extended part remainder
    hda5 (hd0,4) Ubuntu swap ?
    :
    :

    Steps:
    1. Install OS/2 and make sure it boots.
    2. Install Ubuntu, allowing it to setup the grub loader at the MBR.
    3. Boot Ubuntu and check if it has setup fstab to automatically mount
    partitions with compatible filesystems at boot. If not, they can be
    manually mounted (man mount).
    4. Reboot and see if OS/2 is listed an option on the menu.

    As indicated above, Ubuntu's setup may do a lot of things for
    you automatically. If not, you can fix it up later. As far as dual
    booting, check that an appropriate stanza in grub's configuration file to
    boot OS/2. Perhaps, something like this:

    #begin menu.lst stanza
    title OS/2
    rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    # end menu.lst


    The grub manual has specific advice for OS/2 which may supercede the above
    general chainloading technique. You may need to experiment to make sure
    this works. The interactive grub shell makes this easy to test. Remember
    to backup first, too. The odds of damaging your setup are highest when
    making changes at the partition and loader level.

    --
    Douglas Mayne

  10. Re: Linux and OS/2 together...

    csola wrote:
    > I would like to install software in the following order:
    >
    > Bootmanager (eCS or Grub?...)
    > eCS - first winchester (HPFS)
    > Linux (Ubuntu 6.10) - first winchester (ext3)
    > Linux swap - first winchester
    > Comon data - first winchester (FAT32)
    > eCS users programs - second winchester (JFS)
    > eCS data - second winchester (JFS)
    >
    > 1. winchester 40GB
    > 2. winchester 80GB
    >
    > How do I go about doing this?


    I did this sort of thing a few years ago with two differences: didn't use
    FAT32 nor JFS, only HPFS. Also, my organization was different, putting
    all the eCS stuff on one disk (what you call a winchester) and all the
    Linux stuff on the other.

    To the best of my recollection here's how my procedure went:

    - started with a working eCS 1.1 on HardDisk 1 that has IBM Boot Manager
    installed. If you're starting from scratch, I'd install eCS first.

    - used LVM from eCS to delete all partitions on HD2

    - used LVM from eCS to create, all on HD2
    7 MB for MBR
    Primary for /boot
    Logical for swap

    - specified that the Linux install the MBR at the beginning of HD2, and
    NOT on HD1 -- on HD1 it would overwrite the IBM Boot Manager

    - used LVM from eCS to add Linux to the Boot Manager

    - when booting, the BM now included Linux, and selecting it brought up
    the GRUB boot manager, from which I could pick Linux or DOS

    The advantage of this organization is that all of HD1 is HPFS (except for
    a small Primary partition formatted FAT for DOS), and all of HD2 is for-
    matted ext3 (or Reiser) or SWAP. I didn't need a separate 'common' par-
    tition formatted FAT32 because the Linux kernal was reconfigured to be
    able to read and write to HPFS.

    Others can probably give more, and more authoritative, details.

    - Dushan Mitrovich


  11. Re: Linux and OS/2 together...

    On 2007/01/05 16:58 (GMT+0100) csola apparently typed:

    > I would like to install software in the following order:


    > Bootmanager (eCS or Grub?...)
    > eCS - first winchester (HPFS)
    > Linux (Ubuntu 6.10) - first winchester (ext3)
    > Linux swap - first winchester
    > Comon data - first winchester (FAT32)
    > eCS users programs - second winchester (JFS)
    > eCS data - second winchester (JFS)


    > 1. winchester 40GB
    > 2. winchester 80GB


    > How do I go about doing this?


    Start by creating all your partitions first, using an OS-agnostic tool
    (not Partition Magic or anything else windoz-centric) or else eCS's LVM.
    If you use LVM, install your BM during the rest of your partitioning. If
    you use anything else, initially use that to create a single cylinder
    primary partition for BM. When all your partitioning is done, complete
    the process by deleting that single cylinder primary, so the eCS
    installer can use the space for BM.

    Once you've completed the partitioning, it doesn't really matter whether
    you install eCS first or Linux.
    http://mrmazda.no-ip.com/tmp/dfsee/dfsw-m7ncd-O.log is a text file
    describing the layout on one of my many multiboot systems that has all
    on one HD eCS 1.14 and eCS 2.0b3, plus DOS, SUSE 10.2, SUSE Factory,
    Fedora 5, & Knoppix, with plans to add Mandriva Cooker as soon as I get
    a round tuit. ;-)

    Whether you use BM or Grub is a personal preference thing, but if you
    wish to depend on Grub to boot eCS, either Grub will have to chainload
    BM first, or you can omit BM if you install eCS on a primary partition.

    Since you too are obviously already an eCS user, I suggest you skip
    Ubuntu and instead install Mandriva or SUSE with KDE, but if you insist
    on the Debian derivative, choose Kubuntu instead. Gnome is just too much
    more NOT like eCS than KDE.
    --
    "I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full."
    John 10:10 NIV

    Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409

    Felix Miata *** http://mrmazda.no-ip.com/

  12. Re: Linux and OS/2 together...

    On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 04:06:09 GMT, Felix Miata
    wrote:

    > Start by creating all your partitions first, using an OS-agnostic
    > tool (not Partition Magic or anything else windoz-centric) or else
    > eCS's LVM.


    Felix is the man when it comes to this stuff. He helped me immensely
    with installing Win98, WinXP, eCs, and Linux on my system. All boot
    beautifully, and did from the first. (I still need to register said
    OS-agnostic tool, DFSee, in gratitude to its author; I'm waiting a
    little while for the new version to come out, and will do it then.)

    > Whether you use BM or Grub is a personal preference thing, but if you
    > wish to depend on Grub to boot eCS, either Grub will have to
    > chainload BM first, or you can omit BM if you install eCS on a
    > primary partition.


    If eCs is on a primary partition, it doesn't need Boot Manager?

    Hmm... I may be able to work that out... someday.

    > Since you too are obviously already an eCS user, I suggest you skip
    > Ubuntu and instead install Mandriva or SUSE with KDE, but if you
    > insist on the Debian derivative, choose Kubuntu instead. Gnome is
    > just too much more NOT like eCS than KDE.


    Out of curiosity, what are your objections to Debian? I'm really
    enjoying Ubuntu, myself, though I want to install KDE and XFCE and play
    with / learn to use them as well.

    --
    The "mypacks.net" address from which this message was sent is
    legitimate and not spam-trapped. It is, however, disposable.

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