How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ? - Setup

This is a discussion on How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ? - Setup ; As said many times in user guides it is a good practice NOT to work with the root user itself but a second user. I setup a new Linux system (Red Hat) and need to create a couple of "normal" ...

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Thread: How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ?

  1. How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ?

    As said many times in user guides it is a good practice NOT to work with the root user itself
    but a second user.

    I setup a new Linux system (Red Hat) and need to create a couple of "normal" users.
    Should I do this create work from the root or should I create at first a "root" clone
    which in turn should be used for setting up the actual "normal" users ?

    How do I setup a clone of root (of cause with different name, password, and initial directory,...) ?
    This clone should have all the rights of the original root user.

    Wolfgang

  2. Re: How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ?

    Wolfgang, you have some misunderstandings, I think. Linux works a
    little differently than that.

    On Dec 2, 2:16 pm, w.herc...@hotmail.com (Wolfgang Hercker) wrote:
    > As said many times in user guides it is a good practice NOT to work with the root user itself
    > but a second user.


    Yes, that's true, but it doesn't mean that user needs root privleges.
    You can log in as a normal user and do admin things if you know the
    root password.

    > I setup a new Linux system (Red Hat) and need to create a couple of "normal" users.

    You can do this. There is sure to be several GUI utilities that you can
    use, again, if you know the root password. Look for something like
    "USERS" etc. Also, doing it on the command line is simple if you must.
    Check those user guides. In that case, also check the commands "su"
    and/or "sudo"

    > Should I do this create work from the root or should I create at first a "root" clone

    Neither. Log in with your own account.

    > How do I setup a clone of root (of cause with different name, password, and initial directory,...) ?
    > This clone should have all the rights of the original root user.


    As far as I know you can't do it. Again, there is no need.

    Tom


  3. Re: How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ?

    On 2006-12-02, Tom F. wrote:
    > Wolfgang, you have some misunderstandings, I think. Linux works a
    > little differently than that.
    >
    > On Dec 2, 2:16 pm, w.herc...@hotmail.com (Wolfgang Hercker) wrote:
    >> As said many times in user guides it is a good practice NOT to work
    >> with the root user itself but a second user.

    >
    > Yes, that's true, but it doesn't mean that user needs root privleges.
    > You can log in as a normal user and do admin things if you know the
    > root password.


    The use needs root privileges; that's what the root password give
    him. It is also possible to get root privileges through sudo
    without knowing the root password.

    >> I setup a new Linux system (Red Hat) and need to create a couple of "normal" users.

    > You can do this. There is sure to be several GUI utilities that you can
    > use, again, if you know the root password. Look for something like
    > "USERS" etc. Also, doing it on the command line is simple if you must.
    > Check those user guides. In that case, also check the commands "su"
    > and/or "sudo"
    >
    >> Should I do this create work from the root or should I create at first a "root" clone

    > Neither. Log in with your own account.
    >
    >> How do I setup a clone of root (of cause with different name, password, and initial directory,...) ?
    >> This clone should have all the rights of the original root user.

    >
    > As far as I know you can't do it.


    It is simple to do: create a user with UID and GID 0.

    > Again, there is no need.


    It's not necessary, but it is sometimes convenient.

    --
    Chris F.A. Johnson, author |
    Shell Scripting Recipes: | My code in this post, if any,
    A Problem-Solution Approach | is released under the
    2005, Apress | GNU General Public Licence

  4. Re: How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ?

    Tom writes:
    > As far as I know you can't do it.


    It can be done, but if he really needed to do it he would know how.
    --
    John Hasler
    john@dhh.gt.org
    Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, WI USA

  5. Re: How do I "clone" the root account / create a second admin account ?

    "Tom F." writes:

    >Wolfgang, you have some misunderstandings, I think. Linux works a
    >little differently than that.


    >On Dec 2, 2:16 pm, w.herc...@hotmail.com (Wolfgang Hercker) wrote:
    >> As said many times in user guides it is a good practice NOT to work with the root user itself
    >> but a second user.


    >Yes, that's true, but it doesn't mean that user needs root privleges.
    >You can log in as a normal user and do admin things if you know the
    >root password.


    In particular, run
    su
    enter the root password and you are root. Do the job you need to do and
    then exit.



    >> I setup a new Linux system (Red Hat) and need to create a couple of "normal" users.

    >You can do this. There is sure to be several GUI utilities that you can
    >use, again, if you know the root password. Look for something like
    >"USERS" etc. Also, doing it on the command line is simple if you must.
    >Check those user guides. In that case, also check the commands "su"
    >and/or "sudo"


    >> Should I do this create work from the root or should I create at first a "root" clone

    >Neither. Log in with your own account.


    Do it as root. Log in to your account aand then su to root.


    >> How do I setup a clone of root (of cause with different name, password, and initial directory,...) ?
    >> This clone should have all the rights of the original root user.


    >As far as I know you can't do it. Again, there is no need.


    You certainly can, however it is silly, since that user IS root. There is
    no difference.

    Eg make a user
    altroot with uid 0. If you log in as altroot you will then BE root. It is
    the uid that is important, not the name.



    >Tom



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