Dual boot problem - Setup

This is a discussion on Dual boot problem - Setup ; Installed, but will not boot, instead get GRUB screen with choice of commands. Trying to get system to boot from second hard drive where it is installed. First hard drive contains WindowsXP. Used to dual boot from first drive but ...

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  1. Dual boot problem

    Installed, but will not boot, instead get GRUB screen with choice of
    commands. Trying to get system to boot from second hard drive where it
    is installed. First hard drive contains WindowsXP. Used to dual boot
    from first drive but decided to move linux off and install on second.
    Trying linux rescue gets message no kernel packages were installed on
    your system - boot loader configuration will not be changed. Installed
    off Fedora 6-i386-DVD and cleared with SHA1SUM. Really puzzled, any
    help appreciated. Basically, how do I get boot loader to boot off MBR
    on hda1 (fails with aforementioned message) - or what else?

  2. Re: Dual boot problem

    On Fri, 24 Nov 2006 at 03:27 GMT, Bruce Barbour eloquently wrote:
    > Installed, but will not boot, instead get GRUB screen with choice of
    > commands. Trying to get system to boot from second hard drive where it
    > is installed. First hard drive contains WindowsXP. Used to dual boot
    > from first drive but decided to move linux off and install on second.
    > Trying linux rescue gets message no kernel packages were installed on
    > your system - boot loader configuration will not be changed. Installed
    > off Fedora 6-i386-DVD and cleared with SHA1SUM. Really puzzled, any
    > help appreciated. Basically, how do I get boot loader to boot off MBR
    > on hda1 (fails with aforementioned message) - or what else?

    Have you tried the fedora-list mailing list?
    https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/fedora-list is where it is at.
    http://www.fedorafaq.org/ , http://www.fedoraforum.org/ &
    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/ are also sources for fedora info.

    I believe the docs mention how to set up dual booting.

    HTH
    N.Emile...
    --
    Registered Linux User # 125653 (http://counter.li.org) | Please remove
    Certified: 75% bastard, 42% of which is tard. | '.invalid'
    http://www.thespark.com/bastardtest | to reply.
    Switch to: http://www.speakeasy.net/refer/190653

  3. Re: Dual boot problem


    Bruce Barbour wrote:
    > Installed, but will not boot, instead get GRUB screen with choice of
    > commands.


    Was that grub installed as part of the new setup, or is it left
    over from the old one? Have you reason to believe the second disk
    is working OK hardware-wise? Have you checked grub's device map?

    > Trying to get system to boot from second hard drive where it
    > is installed. First hard drive contains WindowsXP. Used to dual boot
    > from first drive but decided to move linux off and install on second.
    > Trying linux rescue gets message no kernel packages were installed on
    > your system - boot loader configuration will not be changed.


    > Installed
    > off Fedora 6-i386-DVD and cleared with SHA1SUM. Really puzzled, any
    > help appreciated. Basically, how do I get boot loader to boot off MBR
    > on hda1 (fails with aforementioned message) - or what else?


    If it is not a device map problem , it could be that grub is is simply
    on the
    wrong place -- on the mbr or boot block of disk 2. You could try
    chaining
    (chainloader+1) from the grub you already have on disk 1.


  4. Re: Dual boot problem

    I found a couple of forum postings...
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    drbongo
    Newbie

    Registered: May 2006
    Posts: 1
    Distribution:

    Problems installing Fedora/Mandriva on 2nd hard drive!
    I recently tried to install Fedora Core 5 on the second hard drive of
    my desktop PC. I have Windows XP on the first drive and nothing on the
    second. The install went smoothly but when the computer restarted it
    went straight into Windows XP and the Grub Bootloader did not appear! I
    repeated the entire install procedure with the same result. (Mandriva
    One produced the same problem) For some reason the Grub bootloader had
    not been installed on the MBR of the primary drive! I found a solution
    at the following URL:
    forums.fedoraforum.org/showpost.php?p=5538&postcount=1

    I booted from the Fedora Core Install CD, went into rescue mode,
    started GRUB and was able to install it onto the MBR. You must make
    sure you modify the instructions to match your own partitioning set-up!

    Because I had installed Fedora onto the second drive rather than a
    partition on the primary drive I had to set Grub's root device to
    (hd1,0) instead of (hd0,0). But from then on the instructions worked as
    written, however it is not necessary to edit the grub.conf file at this
    stage!

    I have posted this because other people might be having the same
    problems!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    w to install GRUB on the MBR
    GRUB (GRand Unified Bootloader)

    Briefly, a boot loader is the first software program that runs when a
    computer starts. It is responsible for loading and transferring control
    to an operating system kernel software (such as Linux). The kernel, in
    turn, initializes the rest of the operating system (e.g. a GNU system).

    GNU GRUB Homepage
    http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/


    Problem

    "There is not a boot manager screen at all, it just boots right into
    windows but GRUB boot window does not appear. I cannot figure out to
    access fedora, I do not have a boot disk and need to know if there is
    someway to boot into fedora"

    "I forgot to install GRUB, I didn't install GRUB in the MBR, I chose to
    install GRUB on the first track on the partition where I installed
    Fedora but that was not an active primary partition".

    Solution

    You have to install GRUB on the MBR (Master Boot Record). To do this
    just follow this steps:

    (First of all, enter your BIOS setup and in BOOT Sequence window choose
    to boot with CDROM first.)

    1) Boot with your Fedora Core Installation CD 1.

    2) Type "linux rescue" at the prompt.

    3) Answer the questions about keyboard and language.

    4) Tell the rescue mode to use your proper partition to mount (the one
    that you want to get booted into)

    5) When you come to the console prompt type: chroot /mnt/sysimage

    6) Type grub

    7) Set the GRUB's root device to the partition containing the boot
    directory like this:

    grub> root (hd0,0)

    Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83

    I have Windows 98 in hd0,0 ; Windows XP in hd0,1, Fedora Core /boot
    partition in hd0,2 and Mandrake /boot partition in hd0,6. So in my case
    the command should be: > root (hd0,2)

    If you are not sure which partition actually holds this directory, use
    the command 'find' like this:

    grub> find /boot/grub/stage1

    This will search for the file name '/boot/grub/stage1' and show the
    devices which contain the file.
    Once you've set the root device correctly, run the command 'setup'.

    8) Then, run the command setup

    grub> setup (hd0)

    Checking if "/boot/grub/stage1" exists....... no
    Checking if "/grub/stage1" exists....... yes
    Checking if "/grub/stage2" exists....... yes
    Checking if "/grub/e2fs_stage1_5" exists....... yes
    Running "embed /grub/e2fs_stage1_5 (hd0)"....... 15 sectors are
    embedded
    succeded
    Running "install /grub/stage1 (hd0) (hd0) 1+15 p (hd0,2)/grub/stage2
    /grub/grub.conf....... succeded
    Done

    This command will install GRUB boot loader on the Master Boot Record
    (MBR) of the first drive.

    9) Type quit

    grub> quit

    GRUB is now in the MBR.

    10) Finally, you'll have to edit your /boot/grub/grub.conf, for example
    whith nano:

    > nano /boot/grub/grub.conf


    (/etc/grub.conf or /boot/grub/grub.conf or /boot/grub/menu.lst, they
    are the same file) This file has the boot partitions of the disk/s.

    11) Restart your PC without the Fedora Core CD 1 Installation.


    My grub.conf

    default=0
    timeout=30
    splashimage=(hd0,2)/grub/splash.xpm.gz

    title GNU/Linux Fedora Core 1 (2.4.22-1.2188.nptl)
    root (hd0,2)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.22-1.2188.nptl ro root=LABEL=/ hdc=ide-scsi
    hdd=ide-scsi apm=off acpi=on vga=788
    initrd /initrd-2.4.22-1.2188.nptl.img

    #title GNU/Linux Fedora Core 1 (2.4.22-1.2174.nptl)
    #root (hd0,2)
    #kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.22-1.2174.nptl ro root=LABEL=/ hdc=ide-scsi
    apm=off acpi=on rhgb
    #initrd /initrd-2.4.22-1.2174.nptl.img

    title GNU/Linux Mandrake 9.2
    kernel (hd0,6)/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda8 devfs=mount hdc=ide-scsi
    resume=/dev/hda9
    initrd (hd0,6)/initrd.img

    title Microsoft Windows 98 SE & XP Pro
    rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    chainloader +1



    List of commands,

    default=0
    My default boot system is, of course, Fedora.

    timeout=30
    Fedora will boot in 30 seconds if you don't touch anything.

    splashimage=(hd0,2)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
    Generally the splash image is in your /boot partition. In my case,
    hd0,2 is where I have the image.

    title GNU/Linux Fedora Core 1 (2.4.22-1.2174.nptl)
    The name of your OS that will appear in your menu at starup, you can
    write anything you want.

    root (hd0,2)
    This is your /boot partition specifies which partition contains your
    Linux kernel image. So "root (hd0,2) tells GRUB that the kernel is on
    the 3rd primary partition of my first hard disk (I have two), in my
    case (hd0,2).

    kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.22-1.2174.nptl ro root=LABEL=/ hdc=ide-scsi apm=off
    acpi=on rhgb
    Tells GRUB where to find your kernel, my kernel version is
    2.4.22-1.2174, you have to type your kernel version.

    rhgb
    Red Hat Graphical Boot

    apm=off acpi=on
    I had to add 'apm=off acpi=on' to my kernel parameters to get power-off
    to work properly.

    initrd /initrd-2.4.22-1.2174.nptl.img
    Tells where your init ramdisk image is located.

    title Microsoft Windows 98 SE & XP Pro
    As I said, I have Windows 98 in hd0,0 and Windows XP in (hd0,1).

    rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    rootnoverify tells GRUB to boot from the Windows partition, but not to
    attempt to mount it.
    (hd0,0) is where Windows XP puts the boot.ini to boot into Windows 98
    and XP.

    chainloader +1
    chain-load is the mechanism for loading unsupported operating systems
    by loading another boot loader. It is typically used for loading DOS or
    Windows.
    chainloader tells GRUB to chain to Windows' boot loader which will
    start Windows.

    Other options you can use:

    map
    If you have installed DOS (or Windows) on a non-first hard disk, you
    have to use the disk swapping technique, because that OS cannot boot
    from any disks but the first one.

    Map the drive from_drive to the drive to_drive. This is necessary when
    you chain-load some operating systems, such as DOS, if such an OS
    resides at a non-first drive. Here is an example:

    grub> map (hd0) (hd1)
    grub> map (hd1) (hd0)

    This performs a virtual swap between your first and second hard drive.

    Caution: This is effective only if DOS (or Windows) uses BIOS to access
    the swapped disks. If that OS uses a special driver for the disks, this
    probably won't work.

    makeactive
    Set the active partition on the root disk to GRUB's root device. This
    command is limited to primary PC partitions on a hard disk.

    Code:

    title Windows 98 SE map (hd0) (hd1) map (hd1) (hd0) makeactive
    rootnoverify (hd1,0) chainloader +1



    hide
    Hide the partition partition by setting the hidden bit in its partition
    type code. This is useful only when booting DOS or Windows and multiple
    primary FAT partitions exist in one disk.

    unhide
    Unhide the partition partition by clearing the hidden bit in its
    partition type code. This is useful only when booting DOS or Windows
    and multiple primary partitions exist in one disk.

    Explanation and examples of the hide and unhide commands

    If you installed more than one set of DOS/Windows onto one disk, they
    could be confused if there are more than one primary partitions for
    DOS/Windows. There is a solution if you do want to do so. Use the
    partition hiding/unhiding technique.

    If GRUB hides a DOS (or Windows) partition, DOS (or Windows) will
    ignore the partition. If GRUB unhides a DOS (or Windows) partition, DOS
    (or Windows) will detect the partition. Thus, if you have installed DOS
    (or Windows) on the first and the second partition of the first hard
    disk, and you want to boot the copy on the first partition.

    Here's how to create two installations of Windows, hda1 and hda2 or
    (hd0,0) and (hd0,1), using the commands hide and unhide.

    For Windows 98 SE "My Entry":
    Code:

    title My Entry unhide (hd0,0) hide (hd0,1) rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    makeactive chainloader +1



    For Windows 98 SE "Family Entry"
    Code:

    title Family Entry unhide (hd0,1) hide (hd0,0) rootnoverify (hd0,1)
    makeactive chainloader +1



    I did not have to use the 'hide' or 'unhide' command 'cause Windows XP,
    2000 or NT have a boot manager (boot.ini) included. So, I only had to
    point where this boot.ini is. In my case, Windows XP copies this
    boot.ini where Windows 98 is installed, (hd0,0)
    You should definitely use the 'hide' or 'unhide' command if you
    have,for example, two installations of Windows 98 or ME.


    If everything went just fine, voila, GRUB now becomes your main boot
    manager for your multi OS system.


    GRUB and Linux Partitions

    First of all, GRUB requires that the device name be enclosed with ( ).
    Please, note that the partition numbers are counted from zero, not from
    one.


    (hd0) in GRUB = is hda in Linux
    Here, 'hd' means it is a hard disk drive. The first integer '0'
    indicates the drive number, that is, the first hard disk.


    (hd1) in GRUB = is hdb in Linux
    The first integer '1' indicates the drive number, that is, the second
    hard disk.


    (hd0,1) in GRUB = is hda2 in Linux
    This expression means the second primary partition of the first hard
    disk drive. In this case, GRUB uses one partition of the disk, instead
    of the whole disk.


    (hd0,4) in GRUB = hda5 in Linux
    This specifies the first extended partition of the first hard disk
    drive. Note that the partition numbers for extended partitions are
    counted from '4', regardless of the actual number of primary partitions
    on your hard disk.


    (hd0,5) in GRUB = hda6 in Linux
    This is the first logical unit of the extended partition of the the
    first hard disk.


    (hd1,0) in GRUB = is hdb1 in Linux
    This is the first primary partition of the second hard disk.


    Related HOWTO
    How to edit your grub.conf
    http://www.fedoraforum.org/forum/sh...s=&threadid=996

    Good Luck !
    ___________________________
    Greetings


  5. Re: Dual boot problem

    On Fri, 24 Nov 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.setup, in article
    , Bruce Barbour wrote:

    >Installed, but will not boot, instead get GRUB screen with choice of
    >commands. Trying to get system to boot from second hard drive where it
    >is installed. First hard drive contains WindowsXP. Used to dual boot
    >from first drive but decided to move linux off and install on second.


    Where on the second? /dev/hdb1? /dev/hdb5? This sounds as if it's
    the second installation on the computer, with the first as windoze on
    /dev/hda1 (the C: drive) and some Linux on another partition on that
    drive (perhaps /dev/hda2). Then you somehow removed that Linux install,
    but didn't clear the boot loader. Is that correct?

    >Trying linux rescue gets message no kernel packages were installed on
    >your system - boot loader configuration will not be changed.


    OK - where is it looking for the kernel? Some where on the first drive?
    On the second? Where? By the way, which 'Slave' drive? Is this on the
    same cable as the first drive? That would be /dev/hdb. If it's on the
    other cable, then this could be /dev/hdc (jumpered as Master) or /dev/hdd
    (jumpered as Slave).

    >Really puzzled, any help appreciated. Basically, how do I get boot
    >loader to boot off MBR on hda1 (fails with aforementioned message) - or
    >what else?


    I'm sorry Bruce, but it's still not quite enough information. Did you
    look at those HOWTOs I suggested yesterday?

    Old guy


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