A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux? - Setup

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Thread: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

  1. A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    Hi guys:

    I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    are? As a discontinued product, Red Hat Linux 9 is more economically
    efficient...since I am just want to learn the basic concept about it
    now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux? Are they similar for a newbie?

    Thanks

    Fei


  2. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    On 2006-11-17, joey_qf@163.com wrote:
    > I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    > what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    > are?


    10 years and a different license.

    > now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    > buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux?


    start by reading some documentation first, www.tldp.org is that way -->

    Davide

    --
    Some drink from the Fountain of Knowledge. Others just gargle. -- Dave Aronson
    And some pee in it. -- moc.oohay

  3. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    joey_qf@163.com wrote:
    > I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    > what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    > are? As a discontinued product, Red Hat Linux 9 is more economically
    > efficient...since I am just want to learn the basic concept about it
    > now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    > buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux? Are they similar for a newbie?


    The first is you are trying to run a business running any Enterprise edition or
    you should be using Fedora Core 6.

    RH9 is ancient history. Been there, done that, did not upgrade until FC4 and
    should have done so earlier.

    RH9 is dead meat. Do not use it.

    Now back when RH9 was the hotest thing there were still many people who were
    able and more importantly willing to help with older RH distros. However the
    Fedora Core releases have caused people to lose interest in even older FCs. They
    have been clean upgrades and overall improvements which the RH releases never wers.

    Bottom line, use FC6 and forget RH9.

    --
    The total failure in Iraq is the execution of the post war strategy but the
    war itself. There was never a way it could win. No people have ever accepted
    foreigners ruling them.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3718
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    Mission Accomplished http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtml a12

  4. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    Thanks Matt:

    I think FC6 is free, right? Where can I download a copy?

    Thanks

    Fei
    "Matt Giwer 写道:
    "
    > joey_qf@163.com wrote:
    > > I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    > > what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    > > are? As a discontinued product, Red Hat Linux 9 is more economically
    > > efficient...since I am just want to learn the basic concept about it
    > > now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    > > buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux? Are they similar for a newbie?

    >
    > The first is you are trying to run a business running any Enterprise edition or
    > you should be using Fedora Core 6.
    >
    > RH9 is ancient history. Been there, done that, did not upgrade until FC4and
    > should have done so earlier.
    >
    > RH9 is dead meat. Do not use it.
    >
    > Now back when RH9 was the hotest thing there were still many people who were
    > able and more importantly willing to help with older RH distros. However the
    > Fedora Core releases have caused people to lose interest in even older FCs. They
    > have been clean upgrades and overall improvements which the RH releases never wers.
    >
    > Bottom line, use FC6 and forget RH9.
    >
    > --
    > The total failure in Iraq is the execution of the post war strategy but the
    > war itself. There was never a way it could win. No people have ever accepted
    > foreigners ruling them.
    > -- The Iron Webmaster, 3718
    > nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    > Mission Accomplished http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtml a12



  5. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    Thanks Davide!

    I will read these documentations!

    fei
    "Davide Bianchi 写道:
    "
    > On 2006-11-17, joey_qf@163.com wrote:
    > > I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    > > what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    > > are?

    >
    > 10 years and a different license.
    >
    > > now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    > > buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    >
    > start by reading some documentation first, www.tldp.org is that way -->
    >
    > Davide
    >
    > --
    > Some drink from the Fountain of Knowledge. Others just gargle. -- Dave Aronson
    > And some pee in it. -- moc.oohay



  6. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    BYW, I want to install a duo system in my laptop - with Windows, FC6 is
    OK, right? If I download from any website which provide FC6, a stupid
    question - is there virus if I download it from a "unofficial"
    website? I heard that no virus attached in open source software, but
    still a littlie bit unsure...

    Thank you so much!

    fei

    "Fei 写道:
    "
    > Thanks Davide!
    >
    > I will read these documentations!
    >
    > fei
    > "Davide Bianchi 写道:
    > "
    > > On 2006-11-17, joey_qf@163.com wrote:
    > > > I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    > > > what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    > > > are?

    > >
    > > 10 years and a different license.
    > >
    > > > now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    > > > buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    > >
    > > start by reading some documentation first, www.tldp.org is that way -->
    > >
    > > Davide
    > >
    > > --
    > > Some drink from the Fountain of Knowledge. Others just gargle. -- Dave Aronson
    > > And some pee in it. -- moc.oohay



  7. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    Fei wrote:
    > Thanks Matt:


    > I think FC6 is free, right? Where can I download a copy?


    From redhat.com of course. Very top of the home page in the center is the
    download link. Free as free can be. Careful looking for it. They do not make it
    obvious but it is free. If you do not have bit torrent try the gatech.edu links
    for downloading.

    As the man said, for free take, for buy waste time. Arthur Godfrey as I
    remember but that just reveals my age. Remember us old farts do not comprehend
    computers. Take everything I say with a grain of Viagra.

    --
    If the gang rape and murder of an entire family had happened in Boulder,
    Colorado it would have been prime time news in the US for ten years. But it
    happened in Iraq by Americans.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3706
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    Mission Accomplished http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtml a12

  8. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    Fantastic! "for free take, for buy waste time" - I will put it in
    my collection! Haha! Thank you Matt!

    I am so sorry, just a quick follow-up question - I have checked Redhat
    website, it is said that FC is for programmers, and Redhat Enterprise
    is for business. Since I am a business student, I would like to learn
    the right version which can be used in future (Maybe). So what I learn
    from FC, e.g. commands and programming, can be applied in Enterprise,
    right?

    Thank you so much! Sorry to bother you!

    A helpless person who wants to learn Linux - Fei

    "Matt Giwer 写道:
    "
    > Fei wrote:
    > > Thanks Matt:

    >
    > > I think FC6 is free, right? Where can I download a copy?

    >
    > From redhat.com of course. Very top of the home page in the center is the
    > download link. Free as free can be. Careful looking for it. They do not make it
    > obvious but it is free. If you do not have bit torrent try the gatech.edulinks
    > for downloading.
    >
    > As the man said, for free take, for buy waste time. Arthur Godfrey as I
    > remember but that just reveals my age. Remember us old farts do not comprehend
    > computers. Take everything I say with a grain of Viagra.
    >
    > --
    > If the gang rape and murder of an entire family had happened in Boulder,
    > Colorado it would have been prime time news in the US for ten years. But it
    > happened in Iraq by Americans.
    > -- The Iron Webmaster, 3706
    > nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    > Mission Accomplished http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtml a12



  9. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Fei wrote:

    > I am so sorry, just a quick follow-up question - I have checked Redhat
    > website, it is said that FC is for programmers, and Redhat Enterprise
    > is for business. Since I am a business student, I would like to learn
    > the right version which can be used in future (Maybe). So what I learn
    > from FC, e.g. commands and programming, can be applied in Enterprise,
    > right?


    Try : http://www.centos.org

    CentOS is an Enterprise-class Linux Distribution derived from sources
    freely provided to the public by a prominent North American Enterprise
    Linux vendor. CentOS conforms fully with the upstream vendors
    redistribution policy and aims to be 100% binary compatible. (CentOS
    mainly changes packages to remove upstream vendor branding and artwork.)
    CentOS is free.

    *a prominent North American Enterprise Linux vendor* -> RedHat

    - --
    Un saludo
    Alo [alo(@)uk2.net]
    PGP en http://pgp.eteo.mondragon.edu [Get "0xF6695A61 "]
    Usuario registrado Linux #276144 [http://counter.li.org]

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.4.5 (MingW32)
    Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

    iD8DBQFFXdHRvzPPcPZpWmERAtBiAJ9FjwIFDqhQc9P5AKciQK pR4MIfdwCgrYWK
    LCkWAg50qoEKDpkWf7lAO9k=
    =VGUA
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

  10. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    Fei wrote:
    > Fantastic! "for free take, for buy waste time" - I will put it in
    > my collection! Haha! Thank you Matt!


    > I am so sorry, just a quick follow-up question - I have checked Redhat
    > website, it is said that FC is for programmers, and Redhat Enterprise
    > is for business. Since I am a business student, I would like to learn
    > the right version which can be used in future (Maybe). So what I learn
    > from FC, e.g. commands and programming, can be applied in Enterprise,
    > right?


    Business means it contains the applications you would want on a computer for a
    business. The apps are probably all on FC versions also. They certainly can be
    run on and the FC distro. A would guess a business version would be if you want
    to become a sysadmin for a non-computer company. That is not what a business
    major needs. You will have several spreadsheets including the integrated one in
    Open Office.

    I have no idea why they would say FC is for programmers. The work station
    option may be but below I recommend something else. I program but a couple
    hundred lines a year is a big year for me these days. I mainly got it because I
    got tired of Windows dying and taking the hard disk with it. Now I have a stable
    OS and one where I can fool around with the innards easily instead of the
    kludges Windows requires if changes can be made at all. My programming is way
    down because the applications that come with linux can be controlled through
    shell scripts.

    If you want to dig into the innards how the OS works they will be the same. (If
    I am wrong someone will jump in and tell me.) If you want to learn specific
    kinds of software that would be used in business such as a web server either
    will do but you might want to see what RH thinks of a business aps.

    I can't think of what might be on one and not on the other. Certainly the same
    apps will work on both. So if all you want to do is learn linux either will do.
    There are very many more people who visit here who use FC than the enterprise
    edition so there are more people to answer questions. You can always change
    later if you find there is a difference worth having.

    > Thank you so much! Sorry to bother you!


    Not a problem. When I was a newbie I was here getting help and after a few
    months I was reading problems that I had solved or got a "Hey! I screwed up just
    like that." You will too.

    > A helpless person who wants to learn Linux - Fei


    Rule 1. You will create a root account and also create a user account for
    yourself. NEVER be root unless you are sure of what you are doing. There are no
    exceptions to this rule.

    I can only talk about the FC editions. At the start of an installation you will
    be asked what kind of installation you want to make. Choose 'Custom'
    installation. Scroll all the way to the end of the options and check 'Install
    Everything'. It doesn't take up that much more space.

    When learning you are going to be reading about a lot of things to try and this
    will increae the likelihood you have it installed already. No need to be
    frustrated while learning or breaking your chain of thought to install something
    new.

    The first thing to run after installing is

    yum upgrade

    You will do this as root.

    That will go online and find everything that has been upgraded since the disk
    release was frozen and upgrade it for you. After that run

    yum clean packages

    If you like the idea of free software run yumex, click the install icon and see
    how much else RH has that isn't on the disks.

    --
    The funny thing is we cannot find any rational basis to seperate a political
    speech by Bush on Iraq from a psychotic delusion.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3724
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    Mission Accomplished http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/mission.phtml a12

  11. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?


    Matt Giwer wrote:
    > Fei wrote:
    > > Fantastic! "for free take, for buy waste time" - I will put it in
    > > my collection! Haha! Thank you Matt!

    >
    > > I am so sorry, just a quick follow-up question - I have checked Redhat
    > > website, it is said that FC is for programmers, and Redhat Enterprise
    > > is for business. Since I am a business student, I would like to learn
    > > the right version which can be used in future (Maybe). So what I learn
    > > from FC, e.g. commands and programming, can be applied in Enterprise,
    > > right?

    >
    > Business means it contains the applications you would want on a computer for a
    > business. The apps are probably all on FC versions also. They certainly can be
    > run on and the FC distro. A would guess a business version would be if you want
    > to become a sysadmin for a non-computer company. That is not what a business
    > major needs. You will have several spreadsheets including the integrated one in
    > Open Office.


    "Business" also usually means "stable and will be supported for the
    life of the system". For programmers means it has a lot of leading
    edge, even bleeding edge tools, and hasn't been through all the testing
    and integration you expect from a business system.

    It's the difference between a convertible and a minivan: one is faster
    and more maneuverable, the other is likely to have back-seat airbags
    andn a more tested motor.

    > I have no idea why they would say FC is for programmers. The work station
    > option may be but below I recommend something else. I program but a couple
    > hundred lines a year is a big year for me these days. I mainly got it because I
    > got tired of Windows dying and taking the hard disk with it. Now I have a stable
    > OS and one where I can fool around with the innards easily instead of the
    > kludges Windows requires if changes can be made at all. My programming is way
    > down because the applications that come with linux can be controlled through
    > shell scripts.


    FC tends to publish new updates much sooner, with less integration
    testing to make sure all the components play nicely together.

    > If you want to dig into the innards how the OS works they will be the same. (If
    > I am wrong someone will jump in and tell me.) If you want to learn specific
    > kinds of software that would be used in business such as a web server either
    > will do but you might want to see what RH thinks of a business aps.


    They're quite different: Look at the package differences. FC is
    typically a year or more ahead of RHEL, meaning new kernel modules, new
    versions of gcc, glibc, Xorg, OpenOffice, video players, and other core
    tools. One big reason RedHat split them is to allow full-blown
    development and smoke-testing of new ideas without imperiling mission
    critical systems, which are typically on RHEL.


    > I can't think of what might be on one and not on the other. Certainly the same
    > apps will work on both. So if all you want to do is learn linux either will do.
    > There are very many more people who visit here who use FC than the enterprise
    > edition so there are more people to answer questions. You can always change
    > later if you find there is a difference worth having.


    No, they need not. I suggest you take a look at perl module
    dependencies, for example, and wireless device or NTFS support in the
    kernels. Even subtle differences in gcc can create all sorts of
    interesting adventures.

    > > A helpless person who wants to learn Linux - Fei

    >
    > Rule 1. You will create a root account and also create a user account for
    > yourself. NEVER be root unless you are sure of what you are doing. There are no
    > exceptions to this rule.


    Except that he's a newbie. He's not going to be sure of anything, is
    he?

    Be cautious with root access: it's easy to screw things up. Feel free
    to pop up here and ask questions, we'll try to be nice.

    > I can only talk about the FC editions. At the start of an installation you will
    > be asked what kind of installation you want to make. Choose 'Custom'
    > installation. Scroll all the way to the end of the options and check 'Install
    > Everything'. It doesn't take up that much more space.


    About 8 Gig, as opposed to 1 or 2 Gig. It also doesn't get all the
    language packs.

    > When learning you are going to be reading about a lot of things to try and this
    > will increae the likelihood you have it installed already. No need to be
    > frustrated while learning or breaking your chain of thought to install something
    > new.
    >
    > The first thing to run after installing is
    >
    > yum upgrade


    You do mean "yum check-update" and "yum update", of course. Also, make
    sure to put in the yum-plugin-fastestmirror tool, to speed up this
    operation in the future.


    > You will do this as root.
    >
    > That will go online and find everything that has been upgraded since the disk
    > release was frozen and upgrade it for you. After that run
    >
    > yum clean packages
    >
    > If you like the idea of free software run yumex, click the install icon and see
    > how much else RH has that isn't on the disks.


    And get yum configuration files for the DAG and DRIES repositories,
    which have many tools RedHat and RC haven't contained themselves. Livna
    is also nice, for tools that RedHat feels legally constrained from
    providing, like Java packages and DVD playback tools.


  12. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    Thank you all here! I will read each one carefully!

    Fei


    "Nico 写道:
    "
    > Matt Giwer wrote:
    > > Fei wrote:
    > > > Fantastic! "for free take, for buy waste time" - I will put it in
    > > > my collection! Haha! Thank you Matt!

    > >
    > > > I am so sorry, just a quick follow-up question - I have checked Redhat
    > > > website, it is said that FC is for programmers, and Redhat Enterprise
    > > > is for business. Since I am a business student, I would like to learn
    > > > the right version which can be used in future (Maybe). So what I learn
    > > > from FC, e.g. commands and programming, can be applied in Enterprise,
    > > > right?

    > >
    > > Business means it contains the applications you would want on a computer for a
    > > business. The apps are probably all on FC versions also. They certainlycan be
    > > run on and the FC distro. A would guess a business version would be if you want
    > > to become a sysadmin for a non-computer company. That is not what a business
    > > major needs. You will have several spreadsheets including the integrated one in
    > > Open Office.

    >
    > "Business" also usually means "stable and will be supported for the
    > life of the system". For programmers means it has a lot of leading
    > edge, even bleeding edge tools, and hasn't been through all the testing
    > and integration you expect from a business system.
    >
    > It's the difference between a convertible and a minivan: one is faster
    > and more maneuverable, the other is likely to have back-seat airbags
    > andn a more tested motor.
    >
    > > I have no idea why they would say FC is for programmers. The work station
    > > option may be but below I recommend something else. I program but a couple
    > > hundred lines a year is a big year for me these days. I mainly got it because I
    > > got tired of Windows dying and taking the hard disk with it. Now I havea stable
    > > OS and one where I can fool around with the innards easily instead of the
    > > kludges Windows requires if changes can be made at all. My programming is way
    > > down because the applications that come with linux can be controlled through
    > > shell scripts.

    >
    > FC tends to publish new updates much sooner, with less integration
    > testing to make sure all the components play nicely together.
    >
    > > If you want to dig into the innards how the OS works they will be the same. (If
    > > I am wrong someone will jump in and tell me.) If you want to learn specific
    > > kinds of software that would be used in business such as a web server either
    > > will do but you might want to see what RH thinks of a business aps.

    >
    > They're quite different: Look at the package differences. FC is
    > typically a year or more ahead of RHEL, meaning new kernel modules, new
    > versions of gcc, glibc, Xorg, OpenOffice, video players, and other core
    > tools. One big reason RedHat split them is to allow full-blown
    > development and smoke-testing of new ideas without imperiling mission
    > critical systems, which are typically on RHEL.
    >
    >
    > > I can't think of what might be on one and not on the other. Certainly the same
    > > apps will work on both. So if all you want to do is learn linux either will do.
    > > There are very many more people who visit here who use FC than the enterprise
    > > edition so there are more people to answer questions. You can always change
    > > later if you find there is a difference worth having.

    >
    > No, they need not. I suggest you take a look at perl module
    > dependencies, for example, and wireless device or NTFS support in the
    > kernels. Even subtle differences in gcc can create all sorts of
    > interesting adventures.
    >
    > > > A helpless person who wants to learn Linux - Fei

    > >
    > > Rule 1. You will create a root account and also create a user account for
    > > yourself. NEVER be root unless you are sure of what you are doing. There are no
    > > exceptions to this rule.

    >
    > Except that he's a newbie. He's not going to be sure of anything, is
    > he?
    >
    > Be cautious with root access: it's easy to screw things up. Feel free
    > to pop up here and ask questions, we'll try to be nice.
    >
    > > I can only talk about the FC editions. At the start of an installationyou will
    > > be asked what kind of installation you want to make. Choose 'Custom'
    > > installation. Scroll all the way to the end of the options and check 'Install
    > > Everything'. It doesn't take up that much more space.

    >
    > About 8 Gig, as opposed to 1 or 2 Gig. It also doesn't get all the
    > language packs.
    >
    > > When learning you are going to be reading about a lot of things to tryand this
    > > will increae the likelihood you have it installed already. No need to be
    > > frustrated while learning or breaking your chain of thought to install something
    > > new.
    > >
    > > The first thing to run after installing is
    > >
    > > yum upgrade

    >
    > You do mean "yum check-update" and "yum update", of course. Also, make
    > sure to put in the yum-plugin-fastestmirror tool, to speed up this
    > operation in the future.
    >
    >
    > > You will do this as root.
    > >
    > > That will go online and find everything that has been upgraded since the disk
    > > release was frozen and upgrade it for you. After that run
    > >
    > > yum clean packages
    > >
    > > If you like the idea of free software run yumex, click the install icon and see
    > > how much else RH has that isn't on the disks.

    >
    > And get yum configuration files for the DAG and DRIES repositories,
    > which have many tools RedHat and RC haven't contained themselves. Livna
    > is also nice, for tools that RedHat feels legally constrained from
    > providing, like Java packages and DVD playback tools.



  13. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    Nico wrote:
    > Matt Giwer wrote:
    >>Fei wrote:
    >>>Fantastic! "for free take, for buy waste time" - I will put it in
    >>>my collection! Haha! Thank you Matt!
    >>>I am so sorry, just a quick follow-up question - I have checked Redhat
    >>>website, it is said that FC is for programmers, and Redhat Enterprise
    >>>is for business. Since I am a business student, I would like to learn
    >>>the right version which can be used in future (Maybe). So what I learn
    >>>from FC, e.g. commands and programming, can be applied in Enterprise,
    >>>right?

    >> Business means it contains the applications you would want on a computer for a
    >>business. The apps are probably all on FC versions also. They certainly can be
    >>run on and the FC distro. A would guess a business version would be if you want
    >>to become a sysadmin for a non-computer company. That is not what a business
    >>major needs. You will have several spreadsheets including the integrated one in
    >>Open Office.


    > "Business" also usually means "stable and will be supported for the
    > life of the system". For programmers means it has a lot of leading
    > edge, even bleeding edge tools, and hasn't been through all the testing
    > and integration you expect from a business system.


    > It's the difference between a convertible and a minivan: one is faster
    > and more maneuverable, the other is likely to have back-seat airbags
    > andn a more tested motor.


    I do not have a dog in this fight. The man said his interest in the business
    version is because he is a business major. To me that means he is not interested
    in learning linux to be a sysadmin for a company. I take it to mean he simply
    wants to learn linux itself. Therefore I say either is good enough.

    As to bleeding edge, being a business major means by the time he graduates and
    preferably after he completes his MBA, any business app that is bleeding edge
    now will be, if it survives, rock solid old stuff maintained by new hires.

    I do not have a dog in this fight. I am just trying to give him the information
    he needs to decide when at this point he is not in a position to properly
    formulate the questions.

    I fall back to the best reason of all being there are more people here who know
    RH and EL but that may make no difference as I have no idea what the difference
    is between the two.

    >> I have no idea why they would say FC is for programmers. The work station
    >>option may be but below I recommend something else. I program but a couple
    >>hundred lines a year is a big year for me these days. I mainly got it because I
    >>got tired of Windows dying and taking the hard disk with it. Now I have a stable
    >>OS and one where I can fool around with the innards easily instead of the
    >>kludges Windows requires if changes can be made at all. My programming is way
    >>down because the applications that come with linux can be controlled through
    >>shell scripts.


    > FC tends to publish new updates much sooner, with less integration
    > testing to make sure all the components play nicely together.


    And as a user since RH5.? I have not had an interesting problem with that. With
    FC4 I found no problems at all. This is likely the yum upgrade system more than
    anything else.

    >> If you want to dig into the innards how the OS works they will be the same. (If
    >>I am wrong someone will jump in and tell me.) If you want to learn specific
    >>kinds of software that would be used in business such as a web server either
    >>will do but you might want to see what RH thinks of a business aps.


    > They're quite different: Look at the package differences. FC is
    > typically a year or more ahead of RHEL, meaning new kernel modules, new
    > versions of gcc, glibc, Xorg, OpenOffice, video players, and other core
    > tools. One big reason RedHat split them is to allow full-blown
    > development and smoke-testing of new ideas without imperiling mission
    > critical systems, which are typically on RHEL.


    Which gets me back to the man saying he simply wants to learn linux. If he were
    asking which to choose for his company there is no question I would have said EL.

    If there were no other consideration I would agree he should use EL. But as a
    learner and if he needs help there are more who can help with FC and EL. That is
    the main reason I have always recommended RH. It has the largest user base
    therefore the most people who can help. For example, given the sudden explosion
    of Ubuntu questions I would not suggest anyone use it for at least a year. That
    being the time it will take for the new Ubuntu users to have the experience to
    answer questions.

    >> I can't think of what might be on one and not on the other. Certainly the same
    >>apps will work on both. So if all you want to do is learn linux either will do.
    >>There are very many more people who visit here who use FC than the enterprise
    >>edition so there are more people to answer questions. You can always change
    >>later if you find there is a difference worth having.


    > No, they need not. I suggest you take a look at perl module
    > dependencies, for example, and wireless device or NTFS support in the
    > kernels. Even subtle differences in gcc can create all sorts of
    > interesting adventures.


    For someone who just wants to learn linux? No. I am confident a new user of
    linux is not going to jump into perl before becoming confident in linux itself.

    >>>A helpless person who wants to learn Linux - Fei


    >> Rule 1. You will create a root account and also create a user account for
    >>yourself. NEVER be root unless you are sure of what you are doing. There are no
    >>exceptions to this rule.


    > Except that he's a newbie. He's not going to be sure of anything, is
    > he?


    That is correct. That is the warning. Ever notice how many newbies stay in root
    because it is convenient?

    > Be cautious with root access: it's easy to screw things up. Feel free
    > to pop up here and ask questions, we'll try to be nice.


    >> I can only talk about the FC editions. At the start of an installation you will
    >>be asked what kind of installation you want to make. Choose 'Custom'
    >>installation. Scroll all the way to the end of the options and check 'Install
    >>Everything'. It doesn't take up that much more space.


    > About 8 Gig, as opposed to 1 or 2 Gig. It also doesn't get all the
    > language packs.


    There are not 8G worth of disks. There are about 3.3G of files. They are in the
    form of rpms not tar.gz.

    >> When learning you are going to be reading about a lot of things to try and this
    >>will increae the likelihood you have it installed already. No need to be
    >>frustrated while learning or breaking your chain of thought to install something
    >>new.


    >> The first thing to run after installing is


    >> yum upgrade


    > You do mean "yum check-update" and "yum update", of course. Also, make
    > sure to put in the yum-plugin-fastestmirror tool, to speed up this
    > operation in the future.


    No, I mean upgrade. Everyone does things differently. I have had no problems.

    >> You will do this as root.


    >> That will go online and find everything that has been upgraded since the disk
    >>release was frozen and upgrade it for you. After that run


    >> yum clean packages
    >>
    >> If you like the idea of free software run yumex, click the install icon and see
    >>how much else RH has that isn't on the disks.


    > And get yum configuration files for the DAG and DRIES repositories,
    > which have many tools RedHat and RC haven't contained themselves. Livna
    > is also nice, for tools that RedHat feels legally constrained from
    > providing, like Java packages and DVD playback tools.


    The more the better. I suggested it so he would see things that might interest
    him. Interest is a motivator to learning. Sort of like teaching English using
    Penthouse rather than Little Women.

    --
    We learn from Lebanon that the most moral army in the world makes the most
    immoral mistakes of any army in the world.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3697
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    commentary http://www.giwersworld.org/opinion/running.phtml a5

  14. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    Matt Giwer wrote:

    > If there were no other consideration I would agree he should use EL.
    > But as a learner and if he needs help there are more who can help with
    > FC and EL. That is the main reason I have always recommended RH. It has


    FC _THAN_ EL

    > the largest user base therefore the most people who can help. For
    > example, given the sudden explosion of Ubuntu questions I would not
    > suggest anyone use it for at least a year. That being the time it will
    > take for the new Ubuntu users to have the experience to answer questions.



    --
    Muslims do not hate Americans. Muslims hate neocons. So does everyone. I
    don't see a problem with that.
    -- The Iron Webmaster, 3709
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    Larry Shiff http://www.giwersworld.org/computers/newsagent.phtml a8

  15. Re: A newbie - What are differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and RedHat Enterprise Linux?

    joey_qf@163.com wrote:
    > Hi guys:
    >
    > I would like to learn how to use Linux now! Could you please tell me
    > what differences between Red Hat Linux 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    > are? As a discontinued product, Red Hat Linux 9 is more economically
    > efficient...since I am just want to learn the basic concept about it
    > now, is it OK for me to practise Red Hat Linux 9 first, rather than
    > buying Red Hat Enterprise Linux? Are they similar for a newbie?


    I would consider downloading CentOS 4.4 from www.centos.org. I've tried
    all the Fedora's (except 6, which I've downloaded but then found out
    about CentOS), but I like the idea of the stable (not bleeding edge)
    aspect of CentOS -- which is basically Red Hat Enterprise. I've still
    got a lot to learn, but I think this is the distro that I'm going to go
    with.

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

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