Password Problem in RH Linux ES - Security

This is a discussion on Password Problem in RH Linux ES - Security ; I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version 2.6.9.42.ELsmp I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But I was not given any user name or password. I understand that ...

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Thread: Password Problem in RH Linux ES

  1. Password Problem in RH Linux ES

    I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version
    2.6.9.42.ELsmp

    I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But
    I was
    not given any user name or password.

    I understand that I can boot with a CD and then create/edit the user
    and the
    associated password. What CD (I did not get one) and where do I get
    it?

    Thanks,

    Tom


  2. Re: Password Problem in RH Linux ES

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    tbbwtf@gmail.com wrote:
    > I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version
    > 2.6.9.42.ELsmp
    >
    > I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But
    > I was not given any user name or password.


    Did you do the initial install on this system, or do you know the person who
    did the install?

    There will be at least one user defined to the system: the "root" user. The
    installation would have asked for the entry of a password to be associated to
    that root user. If you did the installation, or know the person who did the
    installation, find out /that/ password, and you can log on as root.

    Actually, check with whomever installed the system anyway. They probably set
    up at least one user account for you, and they'll be able to tell you the
    account name and password.

    > I understand that I can boot with a CD and then create/edit the user
    > and the associated password. What CD (I did not get one) and where do I get
    > it?


    Well, if you didn't get a CD, then how did you get the system installed on it?
    Whoever installed the system will have the CD.

    For that matter, you can probably use /any/ Linux bootable CD (say, the Ubuntu
    trial CD) and create a user on your RH ES box.

    HTH
    - --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | Registered Linux User #112576
    GPG public Key available upon request | http://pitcher.digitalfreehold.ca/
    Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.
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  3. Re: Password Problem in RH Linux ES

    On Apr 28, 3:30 pm, tbb...@gmail.com wrote:
    > I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version
    > 2.6.9.42.ELsmp
    >
    > I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But
    > I was
    > not given any user name or password.
    >
    > I understand that I can boot with a CD and then create/edit the user
    > and the
    > associated password. What CD (I did not get one) and where do I get
    > it?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Tom


    If you own the machine, you can boot into single user mode, and change
    the password, or create an account.

    If using grub (you should see a blue bootup screen), press "a",
    "space", "1", "enter"
    a 1
    That will boot to single user mode.

    Then you can change the root password
    passwd

    Then reboot Ctrl-Alt-Del

    You should create user accounts other than root. Use the useradd
    command.
    useradd someone
    passwd someone

    Here is a link to my article on this topic:

    http://systemnotesorg.blogspot.com/2...-get-into.html



  4. Re: Password Problem in RH Linux ES

    systemnotes@gmail.com wrote:
    > On Apr 28, 3:30 pm, tbb...@gmail.com wrote:
    >> I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version
    >> 2.6.9.42.ELsmp
    >>
    >> I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But
    >> I was
    >> not given any user name or password.
    >>
    >> I understand that I can boot with a CD and then create/edit the user
    >> and the
    >> associated password. What CD (I did not get one) and where do I get
    >> it?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    > If you own the machine, you can boot into single user mode, and change
    > the password, or create an account.
    >
    > If using grub (you should see a blue bootup screen), press "a",
    > "space", "1", "enter"
    > a 1
    > That will boot to single user mode.
    >
    > Then you can change the root password
    > passwd
    >
    > Then reboot Ctrl-Alt-Del
    >
    > You should create user accounts other than root. Use the useradd
    > command.
    > useradd someone
    > passwd someone
    >
    > Here is a link to my article on this topic:
    >
    > http://systemnotesorg.blogspot.com/2...-get-into.html
    >
    >


    What if I'm smart enough to require a password for single user mode? If
    someone that doesn't have root has physical access to the machine I
    might as well have added them to the wheel group.

  5. Re: Password Problem in RH Linux ES

    On Apr 30, 6:47 am, El Diablo con Queso wrote:
    > systemno...@gmail.com wrote:
    > > On Apr 28, 3:30 pm, tbb...@gmail.com wrote:
    > >> I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version
    > >> 2.6.9.42.ELsmp

    >
    > >> I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But
    > >> I was
    > >> not given any user name or password.

    >
    > >> I understand that I can boot with a CD and then create/edit the user
    > >> and the
    > >> associated password. What CD (I did not get one) and where do I get
    > >> it?

    >
    > >> Thanks,

    >
    > >> Tom

    >
    > > If you own the machine, you can boot into single user mode, and change
    > > the password, or create an account.

    >
    > > If using grub (you should see a blue bootup screen), press "a",
    > > "space", "1", "enter"
    > > a 1
    > > That will boot to single user mode.

    >
    > > Then you can change the root password
    > > passwd

    >
    > > Then reboot Ctrl-Alt-Del

    >
    > > You should create user accounts other than root. Use the useradd
    > > command.
    > > useradd someone
    > > passwd someone

    >
    > > Here is a link to my article on this topic:

    >
    > >http://systemnotesorg.blogspot.com/2...e-root-passwor...

    >
    > What if I'm smart enough to require a password for single user mode? If
    > someone that doesn't have root has physical access to the machine I
    > might as well have added them to the wheel group.


    You can always over-write the master boot record with grub using
    bootable media in recovery mode.

    Users should know that they are not allowed to change accounts.
    People who are not sysadmins should generally not have root. Even
    sysadmins should use sudo, so that the logs show who did something
    rather than root did something. If a user knows enough to get access
    to a locked-down system, maybe they should be helping you solve
    problems on other machines.

    If you are managing accounts with NIS or LDAP, you can have the /etc/
    passwd and /etc/group files overwritten with cron, or even ignored
    (maybe not a good idea), if desired.



  6. Re: Password Problem in RH Linux ES

    On 10 May, 19:50, systemno...@gmail.com wrote:
    > On Apr 30, 6:47 am, El Diablo con Queso wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > systemno...@gmail.com wrote:
    > > > On Apr 28, 3:30 pm, tbb...@gmail.com wrote:
    > > >> I have a PowerEdge 2950 Server with Red Hat Linux ES version
    > > >> 2.6.9.42.ELsmp

    >
    > > >> I boot it up, and eventually it asks for a user name and password. But
    > > >> I was
    > > >> not given any user name or password.

    >
    > > >> I understand that I can boot with a CD and then create/edit the user
    > > >> and the
    > > >> associated password. What CD (I did not get one) and where do I get
    > > >> it?

    >
    > > >> Thanks,

    >
    > > >> Tom

    >
    > > > If you own the machine, you can boot into single user mode, and change
    > > > the password, or create an account.

    >
    > > > If using grub (you should see a blue bootup screen), press "a",
    > > > "space", "1", "enter"
    > > > a 1
    > > > That will boot to single user mode.

    >
    > > > Then you can change the root password
    > > > passwd

    >
    > > > Then reboot Ctrl-Alt-Del

    >
    > > > You should create user accounts other than root. Use the useradd
    > > > command.
    > > > useradd someone
    > > > passwd someone

    >
    > > > Here is a link to my article on this topic:

    >
    > > >http://systemnotesorg.blogspot.com/2...e-root-passwor...

    >
    > > What if I'm smart enough to require a password for single user mode? If
    > > someone that doesn't have root has physical access to the machine I
    > > might as well have added them to the wheel group.

    >
    > You can always over-write the master boot record with grub using
    > bootable media in recovery mode.
    >
    > Users should know that they are not allowed to change accounts.
    > People who are not sysadmins should generally not have root. Even
    > sysadmins should use sudo, so that the logs show who did something
    > rather than root did something. If a user knows enough to get access
    > to a locked-down system, maybe they should be helping you solve
    > problems on other machines.
    >
    > If you are managing accounts with NIS or LDAP, you can have the /etc/
    > passwd and /etc/group files overwritten with cron, or even ignored
    > (maybe not a good idea), if desired.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Sigh. Youngsters. I love youngsters.....

    Much of your advice is good. But overwriting /etc/passwd and /etc/
    shadow on a regular basis is *begging* for pain, because new software
    installations may generate necessary usernames for local software
    configurations that will get screwed up by this. (Nagios, MySQP,
    vsftpd, and HTTPD are simple examples that install local user
    accounts.) It takes some careful management to maintain local system
    accounts across a network.

    For the original poster, and other RHEL users: the CentOS installation
    or rescue CD's are identical in kernel and configuration to the RHEL
    ones, since they're rebuilt from RHEL source. And they're easily
    downloaded from a CentOS mirror near you: I find them very handy for
    distributing to RHEL admins as rescue tools. Even an Ubuntu LiveCD can
    usually do the job, although you want to be careful about system
    operations like "mkfs" which may be software version dependent. (I
    still remember the pain when I found out that the RedHat 7.2 "mkfs -t
    ext2" created partitions unreadable under RedHat 6.2).


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