3 to 13 date is missing in linux - Security

This is a discussion on 3 to 13 date is missing in linux - Security ; when u fire the following command u will find that date 3 to 13 is not been displayed # cal 9 1752 why so ? please reply i am eager to know the reason ....

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Thread: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

  1. 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    when u fire the following command u will find that date 3 to 13 is not
    been displayed
    # cal 9 1752
    why so ?
    please reply
    i am eager to know the reason .


  2. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    "sem" writes:

    >when u fire the following command u will find that date 3 to 13 is not
    >been displayed
    ># cal 9 1752
    >why so ?
    >please reply
    >i am eager to know the reason .



    Homework? Read the online manual for cal:

    The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred in 1752 on the 3rd
    of September. By this time, most countries had recognized the reforma-
    tion (although a few did not recognize it until the early 1900's.)
    Ten days following that date were eliminated by the reformation, so the
    calendar for that month is a bit unusual.

    Does Windows implement this incorrectly?

    --
    Chris.

  3. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    In news:ejmhqi$n8f$1@enyo.uwa.edu.au,
    Chris McDonald wrote:

    > The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred in 1752 on
    > the 3rd of September. By this time, most countries had
    > recognized the reforma- tion (although a few did not recognize it
    > until the early 1900's.) Ten days following that date were
    > eliminated by the reformation, so the calendar for that month is
    > a bit unusual.


    I've always had the idea that it was difficult time for those poor peasants
    who were paying monthly rent, as they had less time to acquire the necessary
    funds.


  4. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    On 2006-11-18, Chris McDonald wrote:
    > Does Windows implement this incorrectly?
    >

    Time to fire up qemu

    Windows calendar (under winxp home) appears to only go from 1980 to
    2099. So I guess it's not implemented correctly /or/ incorrectly.

    --
    Ian Kilgore
    echo "pfxz@pfxz.trw" | tr pzfwxt ikagno

  5. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    On 2006-11-19, Ian Kilgore wrote:
    >
    > Windows calendar (under winxp home) appears to only go from 1980 to
    > 2099. So I guess it's not implemented correctly /or/ incorrectly.


    Any calendar that can't represent my year of birth is not implemented
    correctly. ;-)

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  6. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux


    Keith Keller wrote:
    > On 2006-11-19, Ian Kilgore wrote:
    > >
    > > Windows calendar (under winxp home) appears to only go from 1980 to
    > > 2099. So I guess it's not implemented correctly /or/ incorrectly.

    >
    > Any calendar that can't represent my year of birth is not implemented
    > correctly. ;-)
    >
    > --keith
    >
    > --
    > kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    > (try just my userid to email me)
    > AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    > see X- headers for PGP signature information



    well mind enlightning us with your dob. so we can discuss what cal. are
    right or wrong. atleast we can make that thing as a standard in future
    calendar programming :P


  7. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    On Sat, 18 Nov 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.security, in article
    <4s8o81Fu68d6U1@mid.individual.net>, ynotssor wrote:

    >Chris McDonald wrote:


    >> The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred in 1752 on
    >> the 3rd of September. By this time, most countries had
    >> recognized the reforma- tion (although a few did not recognize it
    >> until the early 1900's.) Ten days following that date were
    >> eliminated by the reformation, so the calendar for that month is
    >> a bit unusual.


    Calendar reform itself was a mess. The original decree by Pope Gregory XIII
    took effect on 04 October 1582 (the following day being 15 October). But this
    was more or less irrelevant in "non-Catholic" countries, some of which never
    used the Julian calendar, because Caesar (even Rome) was unknown.

    >I've always had the idea that it was difficult time for those poor peasants
    >who were paying monthly rent, as they had less time to acquire the necessary
    >funds.


    Not only that, but I'd bet those ten days were still included in the interest
    computations on the monthly credit card bills.

    My understanding of the economics of that era was that rents were set on
    a percentage of sales/crops ratio, OR a set amount on a seasonal or annual
    basis. There were few private land-owners, and either the "king" (or
    equivalent) or some of his designated underlings or "the church" effectively
    "owned" everything. But then, the world is a large place, and things were
    not the same everywhere. In some areas, "rent" was paid by labor service.

    Old guy

  8. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    In news:slrnem1k0q.b23.ibuprofin@compton.phx.az.us,
    Moe Trin wrote:

    >> I've always had the idea that it was difficult time for those poor
    >> peasants who were paying monthly rent, as they had less time to
    >> acquire the necessary funds.

    >
    > Not only that, but I'd bet those ten days were still included in the
    > interest computations on the monthly credit card bills.
    >
    > My understanding of the economics of that era was that rents were set
    > on a percentage of sales/crops ratio, OR a set amount on a seasonal
    > or annual basis.


    Yes, commonly called "sharecropping"; those people were probably the least
    affected.

    > There were few private land-owners, and either the
    > "king" (or equivalent) or some of his designated underlings or "the
    > church" effectively "owned" everything. But then, the world is a
    > large place, and things were not the same everywhere. In some
    > areas, "rent" was paid by labor service.


    A great many people brought their produce, meat, knitting and other wares to
    marketplaces which exacted some monthly payment for space used, just as
    today. Fewer days in the month to sell things meant that the monthly usage
    fee was a substantially greater proportion than usual of their sales.

    Might make an interesting class project for some economics undergrad.


  9. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) writes:

    >On Sat, 18 Nov 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.security, in article
    ><4s8o81Fu68d6U1@mid.individual.net>, ynotssor wrote:


    >>Chris McDonald wrote:


    >>> The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred in 1752 on
    >>> the 3rd of September. By this time, most countries had
    >>> recognized the reforma- tion (although a few did not recognize it
    >>> until the early 1900's.) Ten days following that date were
    >>> eliminated by the reformation, so the calendar for that month is
    >>> a bit unusual.


    No it did not. It occured over the course a few centuries. What you cite is
    the date of the reform in England. It was delayed from the actual Gregorian
    reform in 1582 because it was obviously
    a papist conspiracy to destroy the commerce of England. Many proposals were
    floated, including a more accurate 33 year cycle. (8 leap years in 33
    years).(http://www.hermetic.ch/cal_stud/jdee.html)



    >Calendar reform itself was a mess. The original decree by Pope Gregory XIII
    >took effect on 04 October 1582 (the following day being 15 October). But this
    >was more or less irrelevant in "non-Catholic" countries, some of which never
    >used the Julian calendar, because Caesar (even Rome) was unknown.


    True, but lets stick to Europe.
    In Russia the calender was changed only after the Revolution. In the Greek
    Orthodox Church it still has not been changed (just as in some of the Oxford
    colleges, the uniform time has still not been adopted, so the hour starts 5
    min after the hour GMT.)


    >>I've always had the idea that it was difficult time for those poor peasants
    >>who were paying monthly rent, as they had less time to acquire the necessary
    >>funds.


    >Not only that, but I'd bet those ten days were still included in the interest
    >computations on the monthly credit card bills.


    >My understanding of the economics of that era was that rents were set on
    >a percentage of sales/crops ratio, OR a set amount on a seasonal or annual
    >basis. There were few private land-owners, and either the "king" (or
    >equivalent) or some of his designated underlings or "the church" effectively
    >"owned" everything. But then, the world is a large place, and things were
    >not the same everywhere. In some areas, "rent" was paid by labor service.


    Rents were annual in general. The bigger objection was the "theft" of
    wages. The employees objected that for that month there would not be paid a
    month's wages but would lose out those 10 days.



    > Old guy


  10. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    On 2006-11-19, torque.india@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    >
    > well mind enlightning us with your dob. so we can discuss what cal. are
    > right or wrong. atleast we can make that thing as a standard in future
    > calendar programming :P


    Well, since I know there are linux geeks older than I, let's just set an
    arbitrary cutoff year of 1900. I don't know offhand of any linux users
    born before then. The big advantage is, since it's a multiple of 100,
    Microsoft is bound to implement it incorrectly.

    --keith

    --
    kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
    (try just my userid to email me)
    AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
    see X- headers for PGP signature information


  11. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 23:49:27 +0100, Unruh wrote:

    > ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) writes:
    >
    >>On Sat, 18 Nov 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.security, in article
    >><4s8o81Fu68d6U1@mid.individual.net>, ynotssor wrote:

    >
    >>>Chris McDonald wrote:

    >
    >>>> The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred in 1752 on
    >>>> the 3rd of September. By this time, most countries had
    >>>> recognized the reforma- tion (although a few did not recognize it
    >>>> until the early 1900's.) Ten days following that date were
    >>>> eliminated by the reformation, so the calendar for that month is
    >>>> a bit unusual.

    >
    > No it did not. It occured over the course a few centuries. What you cite is
    > the date of the reform in England.


    Read that man page excerpt again:

    "The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred...."

    It isn't saying that the reformation happened on that day, just that that
    is the day that the cal program uses for it. After all, they had to pick
    a day, and IIRC the guy who did the picking was English.

    --
    Phoenix


  12. Re: 3 to 13 date is missing in linux

    On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 15:43:56 -0600, Moe Trin wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Nov 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.security, in
    > article <4s8o81Fu68d6U1@mid.individual.net>, ynotssor wrote:
    >
    >>Chris McDonald wrote:

    >
    >>> The Gregorian Reformation is assumed to have occurred in 1752 on
    >>> the 3rd of September. By this time, most countries had
    >>> recognized the reforma- tion (although a few did not recognize it
    >>> until the early 1900's.) Ten days following that date were
    >>> eliminated by the reformation, so the calendar for that month is
    >>> a bit unusual.

    >
    > Calendar reform itself was a mess. The original decree by Pope Gregory XIII
    > took effect on 04 October 1582 (the following day being 15 October). But this
    > was more or less irrelevant in "non-Catholic" countries, some of which never
    > used the Julian calendar, because Caesar (even Rome) was unknown.


    Alfred Roch once speculated that the Pope had promised his
    wife to give up smoking for two weeks, and couldn't make it.

    --
    To email me, substitute nowhere->spamcop, invalid->net.

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