uuencode alternatives for email - SCO

This is a discussion on uuencode alternatives for email - SCO ; I have been using uuencode to put attachments on emails, but it seems that not all email clients read these properly. I've heard that mime solves this problem, and I see UnixWare 7.1 supports mime, but don't know how to ...

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Thread: uuencode alternatives for email

  1. uuencode alternatives for email

    I have been using uuencode to put attachments on emails, but it seems that
    not all email clients read these properly. I've heard that mime solves this
    problem, and I see UnixWare 7.1 supports mime, but don't know how to use it.
    Is there documentation on this anywhere??



  2. Re: uuencode alternatives for email


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Ron Kirschner"
    Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    To:
    Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 9:51 AM
    Subject: uuencode alternatives for email


    >I have been using uuencode to put attachments on emails, but it seems that
    >not all email clients read these properly. I've heard that mime solves
    >this problem, and I see UnixWare 7.1 supports mime, but don't know how to
    >use it. Is there documentation on this anywhere??


    google mime?
    All mime is is a particular way to format a text/data file into headers and
    boundaries that define and describe the content.
    Email is only one thing that uses it.

    To use mime, create a file like this:

    file.eml:
    ------top of file.eml------
    to: joe@schmoe.com
    from me@here.com
    subject: mime email
    [...more headers cc, reply-to, errors-to, x-priority,
    x-your-own-tracing/debug-comments, etc...]
    mime-version: 1.0
    content-type: multipart/related; boundary=foo

    --foo
    content-type: text/plain

    This is the body...
    See attached file file.gif

    --foo
    content-type: image/gif; name=file.gif
    content-transfer-encoding: base64

    [...base64 data, IE: output of "base64
    --foo--
    ---------end of file.eml-----------

    And feed this file directly to sendmail:
    sendmail -t -i or possibly
    /usr/lib/sendmail -t -i
    * not to "mail" or mutt or other MUA (mail client)
    * the command is still "sendmail" even if you have mmdf or other MTA (mail
    server)

    "foo" is any unique value you want to use.
    Pay attention to blank lines, and the places where there are not blank
    lines.
    Headers are at the begining of the file or immediately after any boundary,
    up to the next blank line.
    Pay attention to the -- before foo and only once at the end after foo

    It's simpler to use a mail client that constructs the mime formatting and
    binary encoding and submits it to sendmail for you though, like mutt.

    But that way you do give up some useful flexability in how the email is
    built and what it looks like to the recipient.

    real examples:
    download these two example files to your unix box:
    wget http://www.aljex.com/bkw/filepro/example.eml
    wget http://www.aljex.com/bkw/filepro/example2.eml

    edit the "To: brian@aljex.com" at the top of each and put yourself there
    instead.

    Now mail them to yourself:
    sendmail -t -i sendmail -t -i
    The one that says Bill of Lading, the things to notice are,
    * The text is dislayed in a fixed-width font so the formatting, which was
    originally meant for a printer, is correct in the recipients email client.
    * Now print the email from your mail client. It paginates correctly without
    being a pdf and without relying on line counts and font size etc...

    The one that says Estimate, the thing to notice is how the text is not only
    in a fixed width font, but is even in cp437 character set so it's possible
    to leave the cp437 box/line drawing characters which an application might
    have in it's various printed output.

    base64
    openssl
    mimencode
    ....are programs that can be used to base64 encode the binary chunks the same
    as you used to do with uuencode, and you could create the rest of the mime
    format yourself with a script or with application code like filePro.
    base64 can be had many ways, I have a standalone binary built from the
    FourmiLab source
    http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#base64
    base64 file.b64
    but most boxes have openssl these days which I have timed to be actually
    faster
    openssl base64 file.b64
    Other options are mimeencode which is part of metamail. gmime-uuencode,
    which is part of gmime and has an option to really do base64 despite the
    "uuencode" in it's name. And the higher level scripting languages like
    perl/python/php/etc all have base64 functions built in, most also have full
    mime functions built in too for that matter.

    mutt
    mpack
    lightmail
    ....are all programs that can do all the work for you in one shot, create the
    mime-formatted email and submit it to sendmail.
    You don't need to know what mime is or need to worry about base64 etc in
    this case.
    mpack is available here: http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#mpack
    A pointer to lightmail is there too.
    mutt is available in skunkware, the above page (which is also all available
    via ftp from Tony Lawrences ftp site pcunix.com), JPR's ftp site, possibly
    more places.

    Brian K. White brian@aljex.com http://www.myspace.com/KEYofR
    +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!


  3. Re: uuencode alternatives for email

    I downloaded and tried mpack, and it works OK, except for only allowing one
    attachment at a time.

    I've been trying to generate my own mime code, and it appears that's the way
    to go.


    "Brian K. White" wrote in message
    news:015a01c78217$c08ad090$9500000a@venti...
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Ron Kirschner"
    > Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    > To:
    > Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 9:51 AM
    > Subject: uuencode alternatives for email
    >
    >
    >>I have been using uuencode to put attachments on emails, but it seems that
    >>not all email clients read these properly. I've heard that mime solves
    >>this problem, and I see UnixWare 7.1 supports mime, but don't know how to
    >>use it. Is there documentation on this anywhere??

    >
    > google mime?
    > All mime is is a particular way to format a text/data file into headers
    > and
    > boundaries that define and describe the content.
    > Email is only one thing that uses it.
    >
    > To use mime, create a file like this:
    >
    > file.eml:
    > ------top of file.eml------
    > to: joe@schmoe.com
    > from me@here.com
    > subject: mime email
    > [...more headers cc, reply-to, errors-to, x-priority,
    > x-your-own-tracing/debug-comments, etc...]
    > mime-version: 1.0
    > content-type: multipart/related; boundary=foo
    >
    > --foo
    > content-type: text/plain
    >
    > This is the body...
    > See attached file file.gif
    >
    > --foo
    > content-type: image/gif; name=file.gif
    > content-transfer-encoding: base64
    >
    > [...base64 data, IE: output of "base64 >
    > --foo--
    > ---------end of file.eml-----------
    >
    > And feed this file directly to sendmail:
    > sendmail -t -i > or possibly
    > /usr/lib/sendmail -t -i >
    > * not to "mail" or mutt or other MUA (mail client)
    > * the command is still "sendmail" even if you have mmdf or other MTA (mail
    > server)
    >
    > "foo" is any unique value you want to use.
    > Pay attention to blank lines, and the places where there are not blank
    > lines.
    > Headers are at the begining of the file or immediately after any boundary,
    > up to the next blank line.
    > Pay attention to the -- before foo and only once at the end after foo
    >
    > It's simpler to use a mail client that constructs the mime formatting and
    > binary encoding and submits it to sendmail for you though, like mutt.
    >
    > But that way you do give up some useful flexability in how the email is
    > built and what it looks like to the recipient.
    >
    > real examples:
    > download these two example files to your unix box:
    > wget http://www.aljex.com/bkw/filepro/example.eml
    > wget http://www.aljex.com/bkw/filepro/example2.eml
    >
    > edit the "To: brian@aljex.com" at the top of each and put yourself there
    > instead.
    >
    > Now mail them to yourself:
    > sendmail -t -i > sendmail -t -i >
    > The one that says Bill of Lading, the things to notice are,
    > * The text is dislayed in a fixed-width font so the formatting, which was
    > originally meant for a printer, is correct in the recipients email client.
    > * Now print the email from your mail client. It paginates correctly
    > without
    > being a pdf and without relying on line counts and font size etc...
    >
    > The one that says Estimate, the thing to notice is how the text is not
    > only
    > in a fixed width font, but is even in cp437 character set so it's possible
    > to leave the cp437 box/line drawing characters which an application might
    > have in it's various printed output.
    >
    > base64
    > openssl
    > mimencode
    > ...are programs that can be used to base64 encode the binary chunks the
    > same
    > as you used to do with uuencode, and you could create the rest of the mime
    > format yourself with a script or with application code like filePro.
    > base64 can be had many ways, I have a standalone binary built from the
    > FourmiLab source
    > http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#base64
    > base64 file.b64
    > but most boxes have openssl these days which I have timed to be actually
    > faster
    > openssl base64 file.b64
    > Other options are mimeencode which is part of metamail. gmime-uuencode,
    > which is part of gmime and has an option to really do base64 despite the
    > "uuencode" in it's name. And the higher level scripting languages like
    > perl/python/php/etc all have base64 functions built in, most also have
    > full
    > mime functions built in too for that matter.
    >
    > mutt
    > mpack
    > lightmail
    > ...are all programs that can do all the work for you in one shot, create
    > the
    > mime-formatted email and submit it to sendmail.
    > You don't need to know what mime is or need to worry about base64 etc in
    > this case.
    > mpack is available here: http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#mpack
    > A pointer to lightmail is there too.
    > mutt is available in skunkware, the above page (which is also all
    > available
    > via ftp from Tony Lawrences ftp site pcunix.com), JPR's ftp site, possibly
    > more places.
    >
    > Brian K. White brian@aljex.com http://www.myspace.com/KEYofR
    > +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    > filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!
    >




  4. Re: uuencode alternatives for email

    On Tue, Apr 24, 2007, Ron Kirschner wrote:
    >I downloaded and tried mpack, and it works OK, except for only allowing one
    >attachment at a time.
    >
    >I've been trying to generate my own mime code, and it appears that's the way
    >to go.


    If you have the mutt mail program you can use commands like this
    to mail a couple of files.

    mutt -a file1 -a file2 -s subject recipient@example.com < /dev/null

    ....
    Bill
    --
    INTERNET: bill@Celestial.COM Bill Campbell; Celestial Software LLC
    URL: http://www.celestial.com/ PO Box 820; 6641 E. Mercer Way
    FAX: (206) 232-9186 Mercer Island, WA 98040-0820; (206) 236-1676

    Cutting the space budget really restores my faith in humanity. It
    eliminates dreams, goals, and ideals and lets us get straight to the
    business of hate, debauchery, and self-annihilation.
    -- Johnny Hart

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