SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information - SCO

This is a discussion on SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information - SCO ; Hi guys, Before i start i have a confession to make. I have never used UNIX before! So this is something very tough and foreign to me. Q1: In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver ...

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Thread: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

  1. SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    Hi guys,

    Before i start i have a confession to make. I have never used UNIX
    before! So this is something very tough and foreign to me.

    Q1:
    In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver
    5.0.5 (and yes, it's very old). I would like to study is there any way
    to install 5.0.5 on a IBM based PC? Meaning those PCs which we assemble
    ourselves.

    Q2:
    I noticed SCO uses a host adapter and SCSI hard disk. Can i use the
    normal ATA IDE cable hard drive?

    Q3:
    If the first 2 questions' answer are yes, then where can i find the
    graphics and network card driver? or at least where can i check whether
    or not my graphics and network card are supported?

    Q4:
    Where can i find information on SCO Openserver 5.0.5?

    A million thanks.


  2. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information


    Ant_Magma wrote:
    > Q1:
    > In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver
    > 5.0.5 (and yes, it's very old). I would like to study is there any way
    > to install 5.0.5 on a IBM based PC? Meaning those PCs which we assemble
    > ourselves.


    OpenServer 5.0.5 will install on Intel and AMD 32 bit systems assuming
    the hardware is compatible and supported by the OS. You will need a
    license to do the install.

    > Q2:
    > I noticed SCO uses a host adapter and SCSI hard disk. Can i use the
    > normal ATA IDE cable hard drive?


    OpenServer 5.0.5 support for IDE drives is limited and you may have
    issues with large IDE drives and recognition of the fully capactiy of
    the drives.

    > Q3:
    > If the first 2 questions' answer are yes, then where can i find the
    > graphics and network card driver? or at least where can i check whether
    > or not my graphics and network card are supported?


    There are drivers built into the Operating System that support graphics
    and
    network cards. For details of hardware supported you can check:

    http://www.sco.com/chwp

    Also, additional drievrs for OpenServer 5.0.5 were posted at:

    ftp://ftp.sco.com/pub/openserver5/drivers/OSR505/

    > Q4:
    > Where can i find information on SCO Openserver 5.0.5?


    The support knowledge base at:

    http://www.sco.com/ta

    is a good starting point.

    John


  3. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information


    Ant_Magma wrote:
    > Q1:
    > In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver
    > 5.0.5 (and yes, it's very old). I would like to study is there any way
    > to install 5.0.5 on a IBM based PC? Meaning those PCs which we assemble
    > ourselves.


    OpenServer 5.0.5 will install on Intel and AMD 32 bit systems assuming
    the hardware is compatible and supported by the OS. You will need a
    license to do the install.

    > Q2:
    > I noticed SCO uses a host adapter and SCSI hard disk. Can i use the
    > normal ATA IDE cable hard drive?


    OpenServer 5.0.5 support for IDE drives is limited and you may have
    issues with large IDE drives and recognition of the fully capactiy of
    the drives.

    > Q3:
    > If the first 2 questions' answer are yes, then where can i find the
    > graphics and network card driver? or at least where can i check whether
    > or not my graphics and network card are supported?


    There are drivers built into the Operating System that support graphics
    and
    network cards. For details of hardware supported you can check:

    http://www.sco.com/chwp

    Also, additional drievrs for OpenServer 5.0.5 were posted at:

    ftp://ftp.sco.com/pub/openserver5/drivers/OSR505/

    > Q4:
    > Where can i find information on SCO Openserver 5.0.5?


    The support knowledge base at:

    http://www.sco.com/ta

    is a good starting point.

    John


  4. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information


    Ant_Magma wrote:
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > Before i start i have a confession to make. I have never used UNIX
    > before! So this is something very tough and foreign to me.


    See http://aplawrence.com/newtounix.html

    > In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver
    > 5.0.5 (and yes, it's very old). I would like to study is there any way
    > to install 5.0.5 on a IBM based PC? Meaning those PCs which we assemble
    > ourselves.


    Probably not. 5.0.5 is a bit old. SCO 5.0.7 or 6.0, yes.

    But.. I'd have to wonder why on earth you'd do this. For any new
    project, I'd use Linux/FreeBSD or Mac OS X.. definitely NOT SCO.


    > I noticed SCO uses a host adapter and SCSI hard disk. Can i use the
    > normal ATA IDE cable hard drive?


    Yes.

    > If the first 2 questions' answer are yes, then where can i find the
    > graphics and network card driver? or at least where can i check whether
    > or not my graphics and network card are supported?


    See http://aplawrence.com/newtosco.html for starters. Drivers at
    ftp://ftp.sco.com/pub/drivers/


    > Where can i find information on SCO Openserver 5.0.5?


    Here. At my site. At http://wdb1.sco.com/kb/search Or type it into
    Google.

    --
    Tony Lawrence
    Unix/Linux/Mac OS X Resources
    http://aplawrence.com


  5. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    I assume that your purpose is to understand SCO better to support the
    existing applications. In that case I'd suggest putting SCO 5.0.5 on
    VMware Desktop. That insulates you from some of the hardware issues.
    It's also a much easier environment in which to try out various
    "what-if" scenarios.

    VMware doesn't officially support SCO but I didn't find installing
    5.0.5 on it particularly difficult using emulated IDE. Check this forum
    or Google for more pointers if needed.

    If you're interested in just general *ix skills or for new development,
    then yeah I'd consider something more au currant.

    Ray Robert
    Three Star Software

    Ant_Magma wrote:
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > Before i start i have a confession to make. I have never used UNIX
    > before! So this is something very tough and foreign to me.
    >
    > Q1:
    > In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver
    > 5.0.5 (and yes, it's very old). I would like to study is there any way
    > to install 5.0.5 on a IBM based PC? Meaning those PCs which we assemble
    > ourselves.
    >
    > Q2:
    > I noticed SCO uses a host adapter and SCSI hard disk. Can i use the
    > normal ATA IDE cable hard drive?
    >
    > Q3:
    > If the first 2 questions' answer are yes, then where can i find the
    > graphics and network card driver? or at least where can i check whether
    > or not my graphics and network card are supported?
    >
    > Q4:
    > Where can i find information on SCO Openserver 5.0.5?
    >
    > A million thanks.



  6. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    Ant_Magma wrote:
    >
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > Before i start i have a confession to make. I have never used UNIX
    > before! So this is something very tough and foreign to me.
    >
    > Q1:
    > In my office there are a couple of computers running SCO Openserver
    > 5.0.5 (and yes, it's very old). I would like to study is there any way
    > to install 5.0.5 on a IBM based PC? Meaning those PCs which we assemble
    > ourselves.


    Q1 above is silent on the possibility that you seek to migrate the current
    SCO 5.0.5 to new hardware to replace the old hardware. If that's the
    case, you have two items to consider:

    1) SCO 5.0.5 should not be installed on anything faster than Pentium
    III 1.4GHz (PIII-1.4GHz). P4's and faster CPU's have thermal protection
    built into the chip that the 5.0.5 system can't use. (VMware suggested
    in another post may allow installation on faster hardware by having
    VM Ware kernel provide the thermal interface between the CPU and
    host operating system.)

    2) If you move to PIII, then the easiest way is to install SuperTar
    backup software (Microlite BackupEdge, Cactus Lone-TAR, etc)
    and use the disaster recovery media created by the SuperTar
    to initialize the hard disk in the new hardware and dump a
    full system backup to the new machine. I have used Backup Edge
    in your situation on a system with SCSI tape drive, IDE CD-ROM,
    and SCSI hard disk moving to IDE hard disk on the new system.

    Note that you will need to move the SCSI controller and tape
    drive to the new system to perform this transfer. Future backups
    on the new system will continue to require SCSI tape or IDE tape
    as BackupEdge can't write DVD media on 5.0.5 except with a
    SCSI DVD writer or SCSI to IDE adapter with an IDE DVD writer.
    Either way, you're going to need the SCSI controller.

    Even though the IDE CDROM cannot be used as a backup destination
    on the old 5.0.5, you can have Backup Edge "auto detect" the CD drive
    and create a RE2 ISO boot image that can be transferred to
    any operating system that can write ISO images to CDR media.
    Boot the RE2 media in the new machine with:
    DEFBOOTSTR Sdsk=wd(0,0,0) (IDE disk as Master on Primary controller)
    Srom=wd(1,0,0) (IDE CD as master on secondary controller).
    Beyond this point you may or may not be able to choose the
    "automatic recovery" options to set up the new disk and restore
    the backup from tape.

    If "automatic recover" fails, you can select shell utilities and
    manually perform the setup using "mkdev hd 0 0" (first disk on primary
    HD controller), fdisk, badtrk, divvy -i (note: fdisk, badtrk, divvy are
    automatically called by mkdev hd), mount /dev/hd0root /mnt,
    cd /mnt, mkdir stand, mount /dev/boot /mnt/stand, and
    then "edge xvbf 64 /dev/rStp0" to restore the backup to the disk.

    You should review the man pages on divvy and familiarize yourself
    with the file system layout on the old system.

    If you were to perform a fresh installation of 5.0.5 from the
    installation media, you would need to know the values you need
    to supply to fdisk, badtrk, and divvy anyway. So using RE2 media
    and having to manually invoke these utilities is no more difficult
    than performing a fresh installation.

    Both Backup Edge and Lone-TAR are available as 30-day demo that is
    fully functional to accomplish the task of moving to the new
    hardware. (Smart marketing! Once you use the SuperTar for this
    task, you'll likely not want to be without it as a permanent
    backup solution.)

    >
    > Q2:
    > I noticed SCO uses a host adapter and SCSI hard disk. Can i use the
    > normal ATA IDE cable hard drive?
    >
    > Q3:
    > If the first 2 questions' answer are yes, then where can i find the
    > graphics and network card driver? or at least where can i check whether
    > or not my graphics and network card are supported?
    >
    > Q4:
    > Where can i find information on SCO Openserver 5.0.5?
    >
    > A million thanks.



    --

    Steve Fabac
    S.M. Fabac & Associates
    816/765-1670

  7. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    Hi all,

    Thanks for all your replies. I haven't tried out your suggestions yet.
    I'll work and study on it and then feedback to you guys later.

    Thanks again.


  8. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    Hi guys, i've read somewhere that SCO 5.0.5 is unsuitable for P4
    processors, is it true?


    Ant_Magma wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > Thanks for all your replies. I haven't tried out your suggestions yet.
    > I'll work and study on it and then feedback to you guys later.
    >
    > Thanks again.



  9. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    Ant_Magma wrote:
    > Hi guys, i've read somewhere that SCO 5.0.5 is unsuitable for P4
    > processors, is it true?
    >


    ISTR you need to apply rs506a to turn on the thermal protection so that
    your CPU will not set fire to itself if your CPU heatsink falls off
    whilst computing pi to a zillion places.

  10. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    Ian Wilson typed (on Mon, Dec 18, 2006 at 10:21:32AM +0000):
    | Ant_Magma wrote:
    | >Hi guys, i've read somewhere that SCO 5.0.5 is unsuitable for P4
    | >processors, is it true?
    | >
    |
    | ISTR you need to apply rs506a to turn on the thermal protection so that
    | your CPU will not set fire to itself if your CPU heatsink falls off
    | whilst computing pi to a zillion places.

    You Seem To Remember poorly, since rs506a is hardly applicable to 5.0.5.

    More to the point, TA 115963 flat-out states:

    Openserver 5.0.4 and 5.0.5 will not work with a
    Pentium 4 based system.

    http://wdb1.sco.com/kb/showta?taid=115963

    --
    JP
    ==> http://www.frappr.com/cusm <==

  11. Re: SCO Openserver 5.0.5 information

    In article ,
    Ian Wilson wrote:
    >Ant_Magma wrote:
    >> Hi guys, i've read somewhere that SCO 5.0.5 is unsuitable for P4
    >> processors, is it true?
    >>


    >ISTR you need to apply rs506a to turn on the thermal protection so that
    >your CPU will not set fire to itself if your CPU heatsink falls off
    >whilst computing pi to a zillion places.


    The intel processors will throttle themselves back to a lower and
    lower clock speed to keep the temps under control. It was AMD
    that caused problems if such things as the heat sink fan failed.
    Usually the CPU was gone in a puff of smoke in 1 or 2 seconds.
    AMD fixed that by monitoring the CPU and then if started
    overheating they'd just shut the machine down.

    To me that is the wrong method for a server, while the intel
    approach keeps the server going - even if it's only 400Mhz instead
    of 2.5Ghz. Jeff L noted this a few years back when on each reboot
    his CPU showed a slower clock speed. I've seen this on my machine
    to when the heat sink clip was not fully snugged down on a hot day.
    Worst I got was 1.2GH on a 2.4GH machine.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com

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