pcl to tif - SCO

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Thread: pcl to tif

  1. pcl to tif

    I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty, but
    am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    or e-mailing.

    If any of you have done this would appreciate some suggestions.

    Thanks,

    Greg Ennis


  2. Re: pcl to tif

    Gregory P. Ennis typed (on Wed, Nov 15, 2006 at 03:13:18PM -0600):
    | I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    | to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty, but
    | am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    | that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    | or e-mailing.
    |
    | If any of you have done this would appreciate some suggestions.

    I routinely convert pcl files to pdf files for faxing, using pcl6 (pcl6
    is the binary of the "ghostpcl" suite, which is open source).

    --
    JP
    ==> http://www.frappr.com/cusm <==

  3. Re: pcl to tif

    On Wed, 15 Nov 2006, Gregory P. Ennis wrote:

    > I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    > to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty, but
    > am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    > that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    > or e-mailing.


    Our Print Wizard Personal Edition ($99) can do this (as can the more
    expensive Server Edition). Sample command line:

    printwiz.exe yourfile.pcl /ftif://yourfile.tif /translatepcl

    The input file should be PCL-5. The output TIF file will default to a
    faxable format (pagesize, density, monochrome, etc.), but those can be
    overridden.

    The program can also do the faxing for, using either WinFax Pro or the fax
    engine included in Windows 2000 and later. Target fax number can be
    specified in the command line or in the data file, thereby avoiding
    operator interaction.

    It can also:

    * Create PDFs
    * Email those PDFs
    * Include overlay image(s), even on faxes and PDFs
    * Attach other files to the fax, PDF, or printout

    .... and on and on.

    Regards,
    .....Bob Rasmussen, President, Rasmussen Software, Inc.

    personal e-mail: ras@anzio.com
    company e-mail: rsi@anzio.com
    voice: (US) 503-624-0360 (9:00-6:00 Pacific Time)
    fax: (US) 503-624-0760
    web: http://www.anzio.com

  4. Re: pcl to tif


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Gregory P. Ennis"
    Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    To:
    Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 4:13 PM
    Subject: pcl to tif


    >I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    > to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty, but
    > am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    > that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    > or e-mailing.
    >
    > If any of you have done this would appreciate some suggestions.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Greg Ennis



    ghostpcl converts from pcl to ps or pdf
    hylafax can read ps

    pcl2ps file.pcl - |sendfax

    pcl2ps nd pcl2pdf are scripts that run a binary named pcl6, and all 3 come
    in the package called ghostpcl
    http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#ghostpcl

    Note however ghostpcl is very inefficient when going to postscript. It
    creates huge simple raster data, not high level ps constructs.
    When converting to pdf it does use high level elements. text is text for
    example.

    I've set this up a couple places and it worked ok, but even the cheap
    customers who drove this experiment ended up getting vsifax for the ability
    to incorporate fax request status & history into the application. And vsifax
    reads pcl directly and it's much simpler to use that way. plus with vsifax
    you can mix content in the same fax job just by using appropriate file names
    for the data. ie: vfx -n 1112223333 file1.pcl file2.pcl file3.txt file4.ps
    file5.tiff
    With hylafax (at least at the time) I had to convert everything to one type
    of data and assemble it into a single stream or file to feed to hylafax if
    it was to be part of the same fax.

    I do use pcl2pdf for emails though. Tiff is not a very handy format for most
    end recipients. Windows often doesn't come with a viewer by default. Various
    things that might or might not be installed can view tiff, and a few of them
    will register the file type in windows so that the web browser etc.. cand
    handle them automatically. Quicktime plugin, office, microsoft fax viewer,
    photoshop, various shareware image viewers and editors like irfanview,
    lviewpro etc... The Gimp is available on windows but not many people have
    that as it's not quite perfectly effortless to install it. (i have made an
    effortless installer wrapper around the necessary parts here btw:
    http://www.aljex.com/misc/gimp223.exe )

    If you need tiff specifically for something else, imagemagick (which in turn
    will use ghostscript) can convert ps or pdf to tiff or anything else, but
    beware this is a huge cpu and disk hog. using convert (imagemagick util) to
    convert full page images from one form to another is very cpu intensive and
    also creates huge temp files. it will fail once in a while and leave it's 64
    meg per page temp files behind, and those will pile up over time. on sco
    boxes these files are in /usr/tmp which is in the root partition, which
    often only has a few hundred megs free on sco boxes, so that can be a box
    killer real fast. Even with the occasional crash, just the currently active
    convert jobs can add up even on a small box. Ask me how I know
    You can drastically reduce the cpu load by taking care with exactly what you
    convert and how.
    rescaling is expensive. changing color depth is a little expensive.
    converting from tif (created by the scanner or fax server) to png (for the
    web) but not changing the dpi or color depth at all along the way is
    relatively cheap & fast.
    So it's best to scan at 200dpi 1bpp which is what the fax server needs,
    rather than scan at higher quality and have to convert down for every single
    fax. That said, many of my customers have simply required at least 4 or 8
    bit greyscale as their documents just didn't come out legible at 1bit.
    greyscale bumps the image file size up so much I have to drop to 100dpi and
    use a lossy jpeg image format and still the files are 3 or 4x the 200dpi
    1bit png size.

    200dpi 1bit mono png lossless = 30k to 80k / page
    100dpi 4bit greyscale jpg 70% quality = 100k to 200k / page

    It's a sticky problem because while the jpegs are better on screen, they are
    terrible when convert to fax. They print ok only if the printer is a nice
    high resolution 600dpi laser where the fine dots can emulate the shades of
    grey. at 300 dpi they look pretty terrible but better than the 200dpi fax.
    The png's look exactly the same, perfect, everywhere, screen, print, fax,
    but they are not good enough for low contrast paperwork like faint grey
    forground from the 3rd sheet in a dot-matrix carbonless duplicate form, on a
    pink/green/blue/yellow etc background from that same carbonless form. shuch
    sheets often wash out almost completely white or completely black and the
    all-important text is not readable. The greyscale jpegs render those sheets
    just fine but only on-screen.
    Bumping the jpegs up to 200dpi so that they'll convert to fax more cleanly
    increases the file size just too much (in my opinion)


    ....back on topic

    digiboard has a util called faxjet on their ftp site that was intended to be
    used with some of their fax/modem bank hardware.
    faxjet is a fairly crude util in that it only does one thing one way
    (almost) but it's way faster & lighter than ghostpcl or ghostscript.
    faxjet converts pcl to fax & tiff at 100 & 200 dpi

    You can also install vsifax for free, and that includes some handy binaries
    like /usr/vsifax/lbin/pcltotif .
    Without a licence the fax server won't work, but maybe some of those
    component binaries do.

    Brian K. White -- brian@aljex.com -- http://www.aljex.com/bkw/
    +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!


  5. Re: pcl to tif

    On Wed, 2006-11-15 at 17:23 -0500, Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    > Gregory P. Ennis typed (on Wed, Nov 15, 2006 at 03:13:18PM -0600):
    > | I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    > | to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty, but
    > | am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    > | that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    > | or e-mailing.
    > |
    > | If any of you have done this would appreciate some suggestions.
    >
    > I routinely convert pcl files to pdf files for faxing, using pcl6 (pcl6
    > is the binary of the "ghostpcl" suite, which is open source).
    >


    Thanks Jean-Pierre ... good idea... should work very well for me too!!!!

  6. Re: pcl to tif

    One more note on this, in followup to the previous posts:

    PCL-6 is a way different animal than PCL-5. Be sure you know what you're
    generating and what your software is expecting.

    (Print Wizard understands PCL-5. We are making good progress on a PCL-6
    reader.)

    Regards,
    .....Bob Rasmussen, President, Rasmussen Software, Inc.

    personal e-mail: ras@anzio.com
    company e-mail: rsi@anzio.com
    voice: (US) 503-624-0360 (9:00-6:00 Pacific Time)
    fax: (US) 503-624-0760
    web: http://www.anzio.com

  7. Re: pcl to tif

    On Thu, 2006-11-16 at 15:33 -0800, Bob Rasmussen wrote:
    > One more note on this, in followup to the previous posts:
    >
    > PCL-6 is a way different animal than PCL-5. Be sure you know what you're
    > generating and what your software is expecting.
    >
    > (Print Wizard understands PCL-5. We are making good progress on a PCL-6
    > reader.)
    >
    > Regards,
    > ....Bob Rasmussen, President, Rasmussen Software, Inc.
    >
    > personal e-mail: ras@anzio.com
    > company e-mail: rsi@anzio.com
    > voice: (US) 503-624-0360 (9:00-6:00 Pacific Time)
    > fax: (US) 503-624-0760
    > web: http://www.anzio.com


    Bob,

    Thanks for your reply I am going to try pcl6 made by gs, but I have not
    been able to get it to work yet. I am hopeful to be able to manage pcl
    macro's with this as well. If I am unable to get this to function I'll
    contact you about your product. Thanks again for the post!!!

    Greg

  8. Re: pcl to tif

    On Wed, 2006-11-15 at 18:00 -0500, Brian K. White wrote:
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Gregory P. Ennis"
    > Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    > To:
    > Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 4:13 PM
    > Subject: pcl to tif
    >
    >
    > >I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    > > to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty, but
    > > am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    > > that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    > > or e-mailing.
    > >
    > > If any of you have done this would appreciate some suggestions.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Greg Ennis

    >
    >
    > ghostpcl converts from pcl to ps or pdf
    > hylafax can read ps
    >
    > pcl2ps file.pcl - |sendfax
    >
    > pcl2ps nd pcl2pdf are scripts that run a binary named pcl6, and all 3 come
    > in the package called ghostpcl
    > http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#ghostpcl
    >
    > Note however ghostpcl is very inefficient when going to postscript. It
    > creates huge simple raster data, not high level ps constructs.
    > When converting to pdf it does use high level elements. text is text for
    > example.
    >
    > I've set this up a couple places and it worked ok, but even the cheap
    > customers who drove this experiment ended up getting vsifax for the ability
    > to incorporate fax request status & history into the application. And vsifax
    > reads pcl directly and it's much simpler to use that way. plus with vsifax
    > you can mix content in the same fax job just by using appropriate file names
    > for the data. ie: vfx -n 1112223333 file1.pcl file2.pcl file3.txt file4.ps
    > file5.tiff
    > With hylafax (at least at the time) I had to convert everything to one type
    > of data and assemble it into a single stream or file to feed to hylafax if
    > it was to be part of the same fax.
    >
    > I do use pcl2pdf for emails though. Tiff is not a very handy format for most
    > end recipients. Windows often doesn't come with a viewer by default. Various
    > things that might or might not be installed can view tiff, and a few of them
    > will register the file type in windows so that the web browser etc.. cand
    > handle them automatically. Quicktime plugin, office, microsoft fax viewer,
    > photoshop, various shareware image viewers and editors like irfanview,
    > lviewpro etc... The Gimp is available on windows but not many people have
    > that as it's not quite perfectly effortless to install it. (i have made an
    > effortless installer wrapper around the necessary parts here btw:
    > http://www.aljex.com/misc/gimp223.exe )
    >
    > If you need tiff specifically for something else, imagemagick (which in turn
    > will use ghostscript) can convert ps or pdf to tiff or anything else, but
    > beware this is a huge cpu and disk hog. using convert (imagemagick util) to
    > convert full page images from one form to another is very cpu intensive and
    > also creates huge temp files. it will fail once in a while and leave it's 64
    > meg per page temp files behind, and those will pile up over time. on sco
    > boxes these files are in /usr/tmp which is in the root partition, which
    > often only has a few hundred megs free on sco boxes, so that can be a box
    > killer real fast. Even with the occasional crash, just the currently active
    > convert jobs can add up even on a small box. Ask me how I know
    > You can drastically reduce the cpu load by taking care with exactly what you
    > convert and how.
    > rescaling is expensive. changing color depth is a little expensive.
    > converting from tif (created by the scanner or fax server) to png (for the
    > web) but not changing the dpi or color depth at all along the way is
    > relatively cheap & fast.
    > So it's best to scan at 200dpi 1bpp which is what the fax server needs,
    > rather than scan at higher quality and have to convert down for every single
    > fax. That said, many of my customers have simply required at least 4 or 8
    > bit greyscale as their documents just didn't come out legible at 1bit.
    > greyscale bumps the image file size up so much I have to drop to 100dpi and
    > use a lossy jpeg image format and still the files are 3 or 4x the 200dpi
    > 1bit png size.
    >
    > 200dpi 1bit mono png lossless = 30k to 80k / page
    > 100dpi 4bit greyscale jpg 70% quality = 100k to 200k / page
    >
    > It's a sticky problem because while the jpegs are better on screen, they are
    > terrible when convert to fax. They print ok only if the printer is a nice
    > high resolution 600dpi laser where the fine dots can emulate the shades of
    > grey. at 300 dpi they look pretty terrible but better than the 200dpi fax.
    > The png's look exactly the same, perfect, everywhere, screen, print, fax,
    > but they are not good enough for low contrast paperwork like faint grey
    > forground from the 3rd sheet in a dot-matrix carbonless duplicate form, on a
    > pink/green/blue/yellow etc background from that same carbonless form. shuch
    > sheets often wash out almost completely white or completely black and the
    > all-important text is not readable. The greyscale jpegs render those sheets
    > just fine but only on-screen.
    > Bumping the jpegs up to 200dpi so that they'll convert to fax more cleanly
    > increases the file size just too much (in my opinion)
    >
    >
    > ...back on topic
    >
    > digiboard has a util called faxjet on their ftp site that was intended to be
    > used with some of their fax/modem bank hardware.
    > faxjet is a fairly crude util in that it only does one thing one way
    > (almost) but it's way faster & lighter than ghostpcl or ghostscript.
    > faxjet converts pcl to fax & tiff at 100 & 200 dpi
    >
    > You can also install vsifax for free, and that includes some handy binaries
    > like /usr/vsifax/lbin/pcltotif .
    > Without a licence the fax server won't work, but maybe some of those
    > component binaries do.
    >
    > Brian K. White -- brian@aljex.com -- http://www.aljex.com/bkw/
    > +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    > filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!


    Brain,

    Thanks for such a great answer. Sure appreciate the information. The
    SCO box this application is on already has vsifax, but vsifax's
    pcltotiff script failed to convert the pcl graphic. I contacted vsifax
    to see if their latest upgrade would convert the pcl file, and they
    responded to the negative. Vsifax apparently does not have current
    plans to work on more complex pcl files. I did find some software that
    works called jetpcl, but their license is a little pricey. Jean-Pierre
    Radley has suggested gs's pcl6, and I have been trying to to download
    from his site a fix for SCO 5.0.5, but have not been able to get it
    yet.

    For simple pcl files the visifax software has worked perfectly, but some
    of our pcl files apparently have more complexity than their software
    supports.

    I appreciate your advise about using pdf instead of tif for e-mail...
    good advice... thanks!!

    For my next step I would like to try pcl6 of gs to see if it will work.

    Thanks again for your response!!!!

    Greg

  9. Re: pcl to tif


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Gregory P. Ennis"
    Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 10:44 AM
    Subject: Re: pcl to tif


    > On Wed, 2006-11-15 at 18:00 -0500, Brian K. White wrote:
    >> ----- Original Message -----
    >> From: "Gregory P. Ennis"
    >> Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    >> To:
    >> Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 4:13 PM
    >> Subject: pcl to tif
    >>
    >>
    >> >I am trying to put together some software that faxes a data stream sent
    >> > to a pcl printer. I can capture the data stream without difficulty,
    >> > but
    >> > am having some problems finding some inexpensive or opensource software
    >> > that will convert a pcl file to a tif file that can be used for faxing
    >> > or e-mailing.
    >> >
    >> > If any of you have done this would appreciate some suggestions.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks,
    >> >
    >> > Greg Ennis

    >>
    >>
    >> ghostpcl converts from pcl to ps or pdf
    >> hylafax can read ps
    >>
    >> pcl2ps file.pcl - |sendfax
    >>
    >> pcl2ps nd pcl2pdf are scripts that run a binary named pcl6, and all 3
    >> come
    >> in the package called ghostpcl
    >> http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco/#ghostpcl
    >>
    >> Note however ghostpcl is very inefficient when going to postscript. It
    >> creates huge simple raster data, not high level ps constructs.
    >> When converting to pdf it does use high level elements. text is text for
    >> example.
    >>
    >> I've set this up a couple places and it worked ok, but even the cheap
    >> customers who drove this experiment ended up getting vsifax for the
    >> ability
    >> to incorporate fax request status & history into the application. And
    >> vsifax
    >> reads pcl directly and it's much simpler to use that way. plus with
    >> vsifax
    >> you can mix content in the same fax job just by using appropriate file
    >> names
    >> for the data. ie: vfx -n 1112223333 file1.pcl file2.pcl file3.txt
    >> file4.ps
    >> file5.tiff
    >> With hylafax (at least at the time) I had to convert everything to one
    >> type
    >> of data and assemble it into a single stream or file to feed to hylafax
    >> if
    >> it was to be part of the same fax.
    >>
    >> I do use pcl2pdf for emails though. Tiff is not a very handy format for
    >> most
    >> end recipients. Windows often doesn't come with a viewer by default.
    >> Various
    >> things that might or might not be installed can view tiff, and a few of
    >> them
    >> will register the file type in windows so that the web browser etc.. cand
    >> handle them automatically. Quicktime plugin, office, microsoft fax
    >> viewer,
    >> photoshop, various shareware image viewers and editors like irfanview,
    >> lviewpro etc... The Gimp is available on windows but not many people have
    >> that as it's not quite perfectly effortless to install it. (i have made
    >> an
    >> effortless installer wrapper around the necessary parts here btw:
    >> http://www.aljex.com/misc/gimp223.exe )
    >>
    >> If you need tiff specifically for something else, imagemagick (which in
    >> turn
    >> will use ghostscript) can convert ps or pdf to tiff or anything else, but
    >> beware this is a huge cpu and disk hog. using convert (imagemagick util)
    >> to
    >> convert full page images from one form to another is very cpu intensive
    >> and
    >> also creates huge temp files. it will fail once in a while and leave it's
    >> 64
    >> meg per page temp files behind, and those will pile up over time. on sco
    >> boxes these files are in /usr/tmp which is in the root partition, which
    >> often only has a few hundred megs free on sco boxes, so that can be a box
    >> killer real fast. Even with the occasional crash, just the currently
    >> active
    >> convert jobs can add up even on a small box. Ask me how I know
    >> You can drastically reduce the cpu load by taking care with exactly what
    >> you
    >> convert and how.
    >> rescaling is expensive. changing color depth is a little expensive.
    >> converting from tif (created by the scanner or fax server) to png (for
    >> the
    >> web) but not changing the dpi or color depth at all along the way is
    >> relatively cheap & fast.
    >> So it's best to scan at 200dpi 1bpp which is what the fax server needs,
    >> rather than scan at higher quality and have to convert down for every
    >> single
    >> fax. That said, many of my customers have simply required at least 4 or 8
    >> bit greyscale as their documents just didn't come out legible at 1bit.
    >> greyscale bumps the image file size up so much I have to drop to 100dpi
    >> and
    >> use a lossy jpeg image format and still the files are 3 or 4x the 200dpi
    >> 1bit png size.
    >>
    >> 200dpi 1bit mono png lossless = 30k to 80k / page
    >> 100dpi 4bit greyscale jpg 70% quality = 100k to 200k / page
    >>
    >> It's a sticky problem because while the jpegs are better on screen, they
    >> are
    >> terrible when convert to fax. They print ok only if the printer is a nice
    >> high resolution 600dpi laser where the fine dots can emulate the shades
    >> of
    >> grey. at 300 dpi they look pretty terrible but better than the 200dpi
    >> fax.
    >> The png's look exactly the same, perfect, everywhere, screen, print, fax,
    >> but they are not good enough for low contrast paperwork like faint grey
    >> forground from the 3rd sheet in a dot-matrix carbonless duplicate form,
    >> on a
    >> pink/green/blue/yellow etc background from that same carbonless form.
    >> shuch
    >> sheets often wash out almost completely white or completely black and the
    >> all-important text is not readable. The greyscale jpegs render those
    >> sheets
    >> just fine but only on-screen.
    >> Bumping the jpegs up to 200dpi so that they'll convert to fax more
    >> cleanly
    >> increases the file size just too much (in my opinion)
    >>
    >>
    >> ...back on topic
    >>
    >> digiboard has a util called faxjet on their ftp site that was intended to
    >> be
    >> used with some of their fax/modem bank hardware.
    >> faxjet is a fairly crude util in that it only does one thing one way
    >> (almost) but it's way faster & lighter than ghostpcl or ghostscript.
    >> faxjet converts pcl to fax & tiff at 100 & 200 dpi
    >>
    >> You can also install vsifax for free, and that includes some handy
    >> binaries
    >> like /usr/vsifax/lbin/pcltotif .
    >> Without a licence the fax server won't work, but maybe some of those
    >> component binaries do.
    >>
    >> Brian K. White -- brian@aljex.com -- http://www.aljex.com/bkw/
    >> +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    >> filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!

    >
    > Brain,
    >
    > Thanks for such a great answer. Sure appreciate the information. The
    > SCO box this application is on already has vsifax, but vsifax's
    > pcltotiff script failed to convert the pcl graphic. I contacted vsifax
    > to see if their latest upgrade would convert the pcl file, and they
    > responded to the negative. Vsifax apparently does not have current
    > plans to work on more complex pcl files. I did find some software that
    > works called jetpcl, but their license is a little pricey. Jean-Pierre
    > Radley has suggested gs's pcl6, and I have been trying to to download
    > from his site a fix for SCO 5.0.5, but have not been able to get it
    > yet.


    The problem is 2 things:
    1) jp's ftp server rejects all the values used by all the common ftp clients
    for the anonymous password.
    2) not sure if this is true and don't feel like checking right now but I
    think jp's site can't do pasv ftp which most common clients try to do today.

    Rather than configure your client (or ask what client you want to use and
    say how to configure it) it's simpler to just say don't use any of the ftp
    clients you were probably trying to use and use plain old dos or unix
    command line ftp and respond to the usr & pass prompts manually with user
    ftp and a real email address for the password. Then you should be able to
    use jp's ftp server just fine.

    I also happen to know the version of ghostpcl at
    http://www.aljex.com/bkw/sco#ghostpcl works fine on 5.0.5 but you do need
    oss646c, but you want anyways.

    fox #: uname -a
    SCO_SV fox 3.2 5.0.5 i386
    fox #: whence pcl6
    /usr/local/bin/pcl6
    fox #: ldd /usr/local/bin/pcl6
    /usr/local/bin/pcl6 needs:
    /usr/lib/libm.so.1
    /usr/lib/libc.so.1
    fox #: ls -l /usr/lib/libm.so.1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root sys 41 Sep 23 2004 /usr/lib/libm.so.1 ->
    /opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.5Eb/usr/lib/libm.so.1
    fox #: ls -l /usr/lib/libc.so.1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 41 Aug 31 2000 /usr/lib/libc.so.1 ->
    /opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.5Eb/usr/lib/libc.so.1
    fox #: pcl6 -h
    Usage: pcl6 [option* file]+...
    Options: -dNOPAUSE -E[#] -h -C -L -n -K -P
    -Z...
    -sDEVICE= -gx -r[x] -d{First|Last}Page=<#>
    -sOutputFile= (-s

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