gcc on Openserver 6 - SCO

This is a discussion on gcc on Openserver 6 - SCO ; Has anyone successfully compiled gcc on Openserver 6? gcc-4.1.1 compiles until: cc -g -DIN_GCC -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -o jvgenmain java/jvgenmain.o \ java/mangle_name.o errors.o intl.o ../libcpp/libcpp.a ./../intl/libintl.a \ .../libiberty/libiberty.a Undefined first referenced symbol in file vec_gc_o_reserve java/jvgenmain.o ggc_free java/jvgenmain.o vec_gc_p_reserve java/jvgenmain.o vec_heap_p_reserve java/jvgenmain.o ...

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Thread: gcc on Openserver 6

  1. gcc on Openserver 6

    Has anyone successfully compiled gcc on Openserver 6?

    gcc-4.1.1 compiles until:

    cc -g -DIN_GCC -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -o jvgenmain java/jvgenmain.o \
    java/mangle_name.o errors.o intl.o ../libcpp/libcpp.a ./../intl/libintl.a \
    .../libiberty/libiberty.a
    Undefined first referenced
    symbol in file
    vec_gc_o_reserve java/jvgenmain.o
    ggc_free java/jvgenmain.o
    vec_gc_p_reserve java/jvgenmain.o
    vec_heap_p_reserve java/jvgenmain.o

    -3-

  2. Re: gcc on Openserver 6

    On Wed, 13 Sep 2006, third@whasup.com wrote:
    > Has anyone successfully compiled gcc on Openserver 6?
    >
    > gcc-4.1.1 compiles until:


    There is a port, but I am trying to put together enough people with funds
    to pay the person who has done the port. He wants to be compensated for
    all the work he has done in getting everything working. Please contact me
    off usenet for the details and if you would like to assist in compensating
    the deleloper for his efforts.

    The port will not be available till the developer has been in his mind
    properly compensated.

    Thanks,

    --
    Boyd Gerber
    ZENEZ 1042 East Fort Union #135, Midvale Utah 84047

  3. Re: gcc on Openserver 6

    Boyd Lynn Gerber wrote:
    > On Wed, 13 Sep 2006, third@whasup.com wrote:
    >
    >>Has anyone successfully compiled gcc on Openserver 6?
    >>
    >>gcc-4.1.1 compiles until:

    >
    >
    > There is a port, but I am trying to put together enough people with funds
    > to pay the person who has done the port. He wants to be compensated for
    > all the work he has done in getting everything working. Please contact me
    > off usenet for the details and if you would like to assist in compensating
    > the deleloper for his efforts.
    >
    > The port will not be available till the developer has been in his mind
    > properly compensated.
    >


    How does this fit with the GPL?

    Shouldn't the developer should either keep the port to himself or make
    the source freely available?

    Can one charge for a derivative of GPL'd code in this way?

  4. Re: gcc on Openserver 6



    On Thu, 14 Sep 2006, RedGrittyBrick wrote:

    > Boyd Lynn Gerber wrote:
    >> On Wed, 13 Sep 2006, third@whasup.com wrote:
    >>
    >> > Has anyone successfully compiled gcc on Openserver 6?
    >> >
    >> > gcc-4.1.1 compiles until:

    >>
    >>
    >> There is a port, but I am trying to put together enough people with funds
    >> to pay the person who has done the port. He wants to be compensated for
    >> all the work he has done in getting everything working. Please contact me
    >> off usenet for the details and if you would like to assist in compensating
    >> the deleloper for his efforts.
    >>
    >> The port will not be available till the developer has been in his mind
    >> properly compensated.
    >>

    >
    > How does this fit with the GPL?
    >
    > Shouldn't the developer should either keep the port to himself or make the
    > source freely available?
    >
    > Can one charge for a derivative of GPL'd code in this way?


    One can charge for GPL binaries. The binaries must be distributed in
    accordance with the GPL, which requires (amongst other things) that they
    are accompanied with source code, or the offer of source code, so this is
    perfectly acceptable.

    Essentially, it allows the developer (in this case) to make a one-time
    charge, because once he distributes the code to anyone, the recipient is
    free to re-distribute to anyone else at zero charge.

    Unless one distributes GPL code, there is no requirement to make the
    changes available to anyone. This is how companies such as Google are able
    to use modified versions of the Linux kernel, without contributing all of
    their changes back to the kernel maintainers.

    >
    >


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