Porting from *nix to SCO - SCO

This is a discussion on Porting from *nix to SCO - SCO ; I am trying to port application from Solaris to SCO OpenServer 5.0.7. I have the application on many *nix platforms - AIX, Solaris, HP-UX, Linux. Can someone tell me which source would be easier to port to SCO?...

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  1. Porting from *nix to SCO

    I am trying to port application from Solaris to SCO OpenServer 5.0.7.
    I have the application on many *nix platforms - AIX, Solaris, HP-UX,
    Linux.

    Can someone tell me which source would be easier to port to SCO?

  2. Re: Porting from *nix to SCO


    ----- Original Message -----
    From:
    Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    To:
    Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 4:16 AM
    Subject: Porting from *nix to SCO


    >I am trying to port application from Solaris to SCO OpenServer 5.0.7.
    > I have the application on many *nix platforms - AIX, Solaris, HP-UX,
    > Linux.
    >
    > Can someone tell me which source would be easier to port to SCO?



    Depending on the nature of the application, either Linux or Solaris.

    Solaris is the closest system, so some things will be easier coming from there.

    However there is a pretty good gcc and gnu tools package that has
    been improving for some years and by now the easiest way to build
    a lot of gnu code these days is to use the gnutools/gwxlibs packages
    and lots of linux code drops right in and builds in that environment
    with very little tweaking.

    However the native development kit and the gcc kit are quite
    different, and porting code from linux to the native kit is
    sometimes a pain.

    So it comes down to the type of code in question.
    Depending on the particular code in question, the shortest path
    may be any of the following:

    * From Solaris native dev kit to SCO native dev kit.
    * From Linux (thus gcc/gnu dev kit) to SCO with gnutools & gwxlibs packages.
    * From Solaris gcc/gnu dev kit to SCO gcc/gnu dev kit.

    There are more complications on SCO too unfortunately.
    There is an argument to build a unixware binary instead of a native
    osr5 binary, because for several years osr5 has had unixware binary
    compatibility and SCO themselves recommends that application developers
    use it, and several major application vendors have stopped shipping native
    osr5 binaries, shipping unixware bins as their official osr5 version.
    Generally it works ok but I have had bad luck with at least two major
    apps ever since they switched to unixware bins. pcmiler and vsi-fax have
    both had reliability problems for me on osr5 ever since they went
    unixware-only several years ago. I have been trying every new version
    since then all along on various old and new osr5 boxes and the problems
    never got better. Meanwhile filepro continues to ship native bins and
    it has remined solid, and so have the now ancient last native osr5
    versions of pcmiler and vsifax.

    And now there is osr6 which is fundamentally a unixware kernel in a
    open server userspace, and which can run either osr5 or unixware binaries.
    The best/safest type of binary to run on osr6 is unixware. (Well, I
    imagine there is a native osr6 dev kit that produces "osr6 binaries"
    but they are essentially unixware binaries) I only used osr6 myself
    enough to determine that it was a bad investment of time and effort with
    no gnutools package and no community support and not even the established
    long history of past users that osr5 has to make up for the lack of
    community support that osr5 no longer has either. And at least osr5 used
    to enjoy a small amount of community support even if it no longer does.

    Nominally you should be able to build either an osr5 or a unixware
    binary and expect it to run on all 3 systems (osr5, unixware, osr6),
    and many bins do work fine, and there isn't really much performance
    penalty that I've seen either. So I can't say whether it's necessary
    for you to build 2 or 3 different native binaries or just one, and if
    just one whether it should be unixware or openserver.

    If your app does things that needs deep OS integration anyways, then
    you might as well build seperate native binaries of course.

    You will need some more pointers I think once you decide
    which major approach to take. Like If you want to use gcc on osr5 to
    build a native osr5 binary, then we can help with setting that up.
    I myself am only familiar with osr5 and the native dev kit and the
    gnu dev kit. Others are familiar with for example, using gcc on osr5
    to generate a universal unixware binary, or using unixware or osr6
    at all in any fashion.

    --
    Brian K. White brian@aljex.com http://www.myspace.com/KEYofR
    +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!


  3. Re: Porting from *nix to SCO

    v3nkatraman@gmail.com wrote:
    > I am trying to port application from Solaris to SCO OpenServer 5.0.7.
    > I have the application on many *nix platforms - AIX, Solaris, HP-UX,
    > Linux.
    >
    > Can someone tell me which source would be easier to port to SCO?


    *WHY*"? OpenServer 5.0.7 is out of date and deprecated, and SCO is bankrupt
    with Novell's lawyers gnawing their bones for their mistaken if not fraudulent
    claims of owning SysV UNIX. And SCO is getting out of the business: their new
    business plans announce that they're switching to portable device applications.

    That said, if you must do so, in general, work from the Linux source base and
    install the 'gnutools' package to get a free software based compilation
    environment. Despite SCO's published antipathy towards the GPL, gcc and
    GNU-make and autoconf remain some of the most robust tools for building cross
    platform software.

  4. Re: Porting from *nix to SCO

    Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    > v3nkatraman@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    >> I am trying to port application from Solaris to SCO OpenServer 5.0.7.
    >> I have the application on many *nix platforms - AIX, Solaris, HP-UX,
    >> Linux.
    >>
    >> Can someone tell me which source would be easier to port to SCO?

    >
    >
    > *WHY*"? OpenServer 5.0.7 is out of date and deprecated, and SCO is
    > bankrupt with Novell's lawyers gnawing their bones for their mistaken if
    > not fraudulent claims of owning SysV UNIX.


    And don't forget that IBM lawyers are waiting next in the line, to take
    what remains of SCO when the Novell's lawyers are done with it, for
    their own gory feast on the carcass.

    So get ready the pop-corn, it's going to be a real treat!

  5. Re: Porting from *nix to SCO

    On Nov 5, 2:01*am, "Brian K. White" wrote:
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From:
    >
    > Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    > To:
    > Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 4:16 AM
    > Subject: Porting from *nix to SCO
    >
    > >I am trying to port application from Solaris to SCO OpenServer 5.0.7.
    > > I have the application on many *nix platforms - AIX, Solaris, HP-UX,
    > > Linux.

    >
    > > Can someone tell me which source would be easier to port to SCO?

    >
    > Depending on the nature of the application, either Linux or Solaris.
    >
    > Solaris is the closest system, so some things will be easier coming from there.
    >
    > However there is a pretty good gcc and gnu tools package that has
    > been improving for some years and by now the easiest way to build
    > a lot of gnu code these days is to use the gnutools/gwxlibs packages
    > and lots of linux code drops right in and builds in that environment
    > with very little tweaking.
    >
    > However the native development kit and the gcc kit are quite
    > different, and porting code from linux to the native kit is
    > sometimes a pain.
    >
    > So it comes down to the type of code in question.
    > Depending on the particular code in question, the shortest path
    > may be any of the following:
    >
    > * From Solaris native dev kit to SCO native dev kit.
    > * From Linux (thus gcc/gnu dev kit) to SCO with gnutools & gwxlibs packages.
    > * From Solaris gcc/gnu dev kit to SCO gcc/gnu dev kit.
    >
    > There are more complications on SCO too unfortunately.
    > There is an argument to build a unixware binary instead of a native
    > osr5 binary, because for several years osr5 has had unixware binary
    > compatibility and SCO themselves recommends that application developers
    > use it, and several major application vendors have stopped shipping native
    > osr5 binaries, shipping unixware bins as their official osr5 version.
    > Generally it works ok but I have had bad luck with at least two major
    > apps ever since they switched to unixware bins. pcmiler and vsi-fax have
    > both had reliability problems for me on osr5 ever since they went
    > unixware-only several years ago. I have been trying every new version
    > since then all along on various old and new osr5 boxes and the problems
    > never got better. Meanwhile filepro continues to ship native bins and
    > it has remined solid, and so have the now ancient last native osr5
    > versions of pcmiler and vsifax.
    >
    > And now there is osr6 which is fundamentally a unixware kernel in a
    > open server userspace, and which can run either osr5 or unixware binaries..
    > The best/safest type of binary to run on osr6 is unixware. (Well, I
    > imagine there is a native osr6 dev kit that produces "osr6 binaries"
    > but they are essentially unixware binaries) I only used osr6 myself
    > enough to determine that it was a bad investment of time and effort with
    > no gnutools package and no community support and not even the established
    > long history of past users that osr5 has to make up for the lack of
    > community support that osr5 no longer has either. And at least osr5 used
    > to enjoy a small amount of community support even if it no longer does.
    >
    > Nominally you should be able to build either an osr5 or a unixware
    > binary and expect it to run on all 3 systems (osr5, unixware, osr6),
    > and many bins do work fine, and there isn't really much performance
    > penalty that I've seen either. So I can't say whether it's necessary
    > for you to build 2 or 3 different native binaries or just one, and if
    > just one whether it should be unixware or openserver.
    >
    > If your app does things that needs deep OS integration anyways, then
    > you might as well build seperate native binaries of course.
    >
    > You will need some more pointers I think once you decide
    > which major approach to take. Like If you want to use gcc on osr5 to
    > build a native osr5 binary, then we can help with setting that up.
    > I myself am only familiar with osr5 and the native dev kit and the
    > gnu dev kit. Others are familiar with for example, using gcc on osr5
    > to generate a universal unixware binary, or using unixware or osr6
    > at all in any fashion.
    >
    > --
    > Brian K. White * *br...@aljex.com * *http://www.myspace.com/KEYofR
    > +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    > filePro *BBx * *Linux *SCO *FreeBSD * *#callahans *Satriani *Filk!- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks for that elaborate reply. We have decided to use gcc 2.95.3 on
    OSR5. But we are facing some issues in porting our code.

    We took the code from solaris and are trying to port it to 5.0.7.

    Previously, we fixed one issue due to non availability of getmntent on
    5.0.7.
    Currently we are facing issue with no process related calls. We have
    used /proc to determine the start time, process name, virtual memory
    used on other platforms.

    Do you have any pointer on this? We don't find /proc on SCO. Is there
    any call to get these parameters of a certain process id?

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