User management - SCO

This is a discussion on User management - SCO ; Can I create/delete/amend users in SCO Unix using a User ID which has superuser rights. We would like to create induvidual User ID's for our System Security Department so we don't have to share the "root" password. Please advise SCO ...

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Thread: User management

  1. User management

    Can I create/delete/amend users in SCO Unix using a User ID which has
    superuser rights.

    We would like to create induvidual User ID's for our System Security
    Department so we don't have to share the "root" password.

    Please advise

    SCO Unix Version : 5.0.6

  2. Re: User management

    sdhaya wrote:
    > Can I create/delete/amend users in SCO Unix using a User ID which has
    > superuser rights.
    >
    > We would like to create induvidual User ID's for our System Security
    > Department so we don't have to share the "root" password.
    >
    > Please advise
    >
    > SCO Unix Version : 5.0.6


    man asroot - SCO's version of sudo.

    Then add the rights to scoadmin for the individual unroot users, and any
    other admin tool they should use.

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    ----------------------------------------------------
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    SCO Authorized Partner
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  3. Re: User management

    On Sep 24, 3:46*am, sdhaya wrote:
    > Can I create/delete/amend users in SCO Unix using a User ID which has
    > superuser rights.
    >
    > We would like to create induvidual User ID's for our System Security
    > Department so we don't have to share the *"root" password.
    >
    > Please advise
    >
    > SCO Unix Version : 5.0.6


    You don't need to share the root password.

    With that version, you can assign users the specific authorizations
    you need. For example, if you need someone who can manage printersbut
    doesn't need root for anything else, you can do that. You can also
    use SCO's "asroot" feature or install "sudo". See http://aplawrence.com/Bofcusm/61.html

    --
    Tony Lawrence
    http://aplawrence.com

  4. Re: User management

    On Sep 24, 3:46*am, sdhaya wrote:
    > Can I create/delete/amend users in SCO Unix using a User ID which has
    > superuser rights.
    >
    > We would like to create induvidual User ID's for our System Security
    > Department so we don't have to share the *"root" password.
    >
    > Please advise
    >
    > SCO Unix Version : 5.0.6


    By the way, for many situations, the auth system is far smarter than
    "asroot". For example, to run passwd, the user needs "auth"
    authorization (and doesn't need "asroot" at all), which will let them
    run passwd for any other user that does NOT have "auth" authorization.
    The idea behind this is that this user can change other users
    passwords, but not root's, or that of any other user who has been
    granted this power. It would be a major danger to do this any other
    way.

    --
    Tony Lawrence
    http://aplawrence.com

  5. Re: User management

    sdhaya wrote:
    > Can I create/delete/amend users in SCO Unix using a User ID which has
    > superuser rights.
    >
    > We would like to create induvidual User ID's for our System Security
    > Department so we don't have to share the "root" password.
    >
    > Please advise
    >
    > SCO Unix Version : 5.0.6


    GAHHH!!! It's the ghost of UNIX past, come to haunt my nightmares!!!!

    Please don't do this: this sort of stunt used to be common in the UNIX world
    20 years ago, but it leads to serious craziness when the operating system
    tools or user tools try to associate uid's with usernames or with USER or
    LOGNAME, and becomes seriously confused.

    Instead, install and use 'sudo', available from Brian White's repositories. Or
    asroot, as mentioned by others, but sudo is more flexible in many ways, and
    it's available cross-platform with a much larger user base.

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