password puzzler - SCO

This is a discussion on password puzzler - SCO ; I moved a 5.0.6 machine a few hundred yards. When it rebooted, I found that the root password no longer worked. I'm a bit flabbergasted. -- JP...

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  1. password puzzler

    I moved a 5.0.6 machine a few hundred yards.

    When it rebooted, I found that the root password no longer worked.

    I'm a bit flabbergasted.

    --
    JP

  2. Re: password puzzler

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:

    > I moved a 5.0.6 machine a few hundred yards.
    >
    > When it rebooted, I found that the root password no longer worked.
    >
    > I'm a bit flabbergasted.


    Not enough detail.

    Was this at the single-user mode prompt, console getty, inbound ssh?

    I can propose a mechanism for the described problem at the single-user
    mode prompt: the keyboard (or connector or controller) broke such that
    OSR5 thinks SHIFT, CTRL or ALT is stuck on. That could potentially also
    explain problems at console getty (but then you'd probably notice that
    the _username_ you're typing, which gives visible feedback, was wrong).

    If it's ssh, ... hnmmmm. In moving it did you change its IP address?
    Move it behind a different firewall or router? Could ssh be configured
    to only allow inbound access from certain places, and provide a
    "honeypot" for disallowed logins (goes through the motions but always
    rejects the login)? Of course moving it shouldn't change the inbound
    address -- but it could if NAT is involved, or if it's now using a
    different DNS server with different reverse DNS description of the
    source machine.

    Also if it's ssh, could you simply be reaching a different machine than
    you think?

    Back at the physical console, could you be getting fooled by a KVM
    switch -- you turned on the machine, got coffee, came back, turned on
    the monitor, saw a login prompt -- but it actually belongs to a
    different host on the same KVM switch?

    Were you abducted by aliens during the few hundred yard dash? ;-}

    >Bela<


  3. Re: password puzzler

    Bela Lubkin typed (on Wed, Sep 17, 2008 at 09:56:40PM -0700):
    | Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    |
    | > I moved a 5.0.6 machine a few hundred yards.
    | >
    | > When it rebooted, I found that the root password no longer worked.
    | >
    | > I'm a bit flabbergasted.
    |
    | Not enough detail.
    |
    | Was this at the single-user mode prompt, console getty, inbound ssh?
    |
    | I can propose a mechanism for the described problem at the single-user
    | mode prompt: the keyboard (or connector or controller) broke such that
    | OSR5 thinks SHIFT, CTRL or ALT is stuck on. That could potentially also
    | explain problems at console getty (but then you'd probably notice that
    | the _username_ you're typing, which gives visible feedback, was wrong).
    |
    | If it's ssh, ... hnmmmm. In moving it did you change its IP address?
    | Move it behind a different firewall or router? Could ssh be configured
    | to only allow inbound access from certain places, and provide a
    | "honeypot" for disallowed logins (goes through the motions but always
    | rejects the login)? Of course moving it shouldn't change the inbound
    | address -- but it could if NAT is involved, or if it's now using a
    | different DNS server with different reverse DNS description of the
    | source machine.
    |
    | Also if it's ssh, could you simply be reaching a different machine than
    | you think?
    |
    | Back at the physical console, could you be getting fooled by a KVM
    | switch -- you turned on the machine, got coffee, came back, turned on
    | the monitor, saw a login prompt -- but it actually belongs to a
    | different host on the same KVM switch?
    |
    | Were you abducted by aliens during the few hundred yard dash? ;-}

    I'll store all of your speculations in case I run into the problem
    again, but this one turned out to be simple. I was trying to log in as
    root at the console. Then I logged in as a different user and at the
    shell prompt, typed root's password. I saw that the the 'n' key needed
    extra exercising before it properly identified itself to the keyboard
    driver.

    --
    JP

  4. Re: password puzzler

    On Thu, Sep 18, 2008, Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    >Bela Lubkin typed (on Wed, Sep 17, 2008 at 09:56:40PM -0700):
    >| Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    >|
    >| > I moved a 5.0.6 machine a few hundred yards.
    >| >
    >| > When it rebooted, I found that the root password no longer worked.
    >| >
    >| > I'm a bit flabbergasted.
    >|
    >| Not enough detail.
    >|
    >| Was this at the single-user mode prompt, console getty, inbound ssh?
    >|
    >| I can propose a mechanism for the described problem at the single-user
    >| mode prompt: the keyboard (or connector or controller) broke such that
    >| OSR5 thinks SHIFT, CTRL or ALT is stuck on. That could potentially also
    >| explain problems at console getty (but then you'd probably notice that
    >| the _username_ you're typing, which gives visible feedback, was wrong).
    >|
    >| If it's ssh, ... hnmmmm. In moving it did you change its IP address?
    >| Move it behind a different firewall or router? Could ssh be configured
    >| to only allow inbound access from certain places, and provide a
    >| "honeypot" for disallowed logins (goes through the motions but always
    >| rejects the login)? Of course moving it shouldn't change the inbound
    >| address -- but it could if NAT is involved, or if it's now using a
    >| different DNS server with different reverse DNS description of the
    >| source machine.
    >|
    >| Also if it's ssh, could you simply be reaching a different machine than
    >| you think?
    >|
    >| Back at the physical console, could you be getting fooled by a KVM
    >| switch -- you turned on the machine, got coffee, came back, turned on
    >| the monitor, saw a login prompt -- but it actually belongs to a
    >| different host on the same KVM switch?
    >|
    >| Were you abducted by aliens during the few hundred yard dash? ;-}
    >
    >I'll store all of your speculations in case I run into the problem
    >again, but this one turned out to be simple. I was trying to log in as
    >root at the console. Then I logged in as a different user and at the
    >shell prompt, typed root's password. I saw that the the 'n' key needed
    >extra exercising before it properly identified itself to the keyboard
    >driver.


    Nothing like old keyboards in server rooms to make life
    ``intersting'' :-).

    Bill
    --
    INTERNET: bill@celestial.com Bill Campbell; Celestial Software LLC
    URL: http://www.celestial.com/ PO Box 820; 6641 E. Mercer Way
    Voice: (206) 236-1676 Mercer Island, WA 98040-0820
    Fax: (206) 232-9186

    The question is, why are politicians so eager to be president? What is
    it about the job that makes it worth revealing, on national television,
    that you have the ethical standards of a slime-coated piece of
    industrial waste? -- Dave Barry, "On Presidential Politics"

  5. Re: password puzzler

    On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 19:11:12 -0400, Jean-Pierre Radley
    wrote:

    >I moved a 5.0.6 machine a few hundred yards.
    >When it rebooted, I found that the root password no longer worked.
    >I'm a bit flabbergasted.


    The problem is obvious. You've relocated the machine over a quantum
    black hole, gravitational anomaly, confluence of forces, magma vortex,
    haunted office, or burial spot of a long dead Windoze server. It's
    difficult to tell which of these is the problem, but all of them are
    capable of generating mysterious phenomenon. I would suggest
    contacting a consulting computer exorcist, philosopher, or diviner for
    appropriate action. It may as simple as magic incantation or a new
    keyboard. If you want to try and fix it yourself, I've found that
    sacrificing an old 486 motherboard on the hibachi is fairly effective
    at appeasing the computer gods and controlling evil spirits.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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