Re: Does 5.0.7 run well on modern hardware? - SCO

This is a discussion on Re: Does 5.0.7 run well on modern hardware? - SCO ; On Wed, Jul 30, 2008, Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote: .... >Run OSR 5.0.x in VMware Workstation, using IDE emulation to make your >life easier. This is what I'm doing for RHEL servers that require >access to OSR 5.0.6. This avoids all ...

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Thread: Re: Does 5.0.7 run well on modern hardware?

  1. Re: Does 5.0.7 run well on modern hardware?

    On Wed, Jul 30, 2008, Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    ....
    >Run OSR 5.0.x in VMware Workstation, using IDE emulation to make your
    >life easier. This is what I'm doing for RHEL servers that require
    >access to OSR 5.0.6. This avoids all the hardware component migration
    >issues, leaves you free to re-allocate resources as needed, and lets
    >you have access to both OS's at the same time. There is a serious
    >performance hit on the emulated system, but I doubt you're
    >overwhelming it with anything as the situation stands.


    I can't say I've seen a ``serious performance hit'' on the system we are
    using here hosting one OS 5.0.6a system, and four active CentOS VMs with
    different versions of CentOS that we use for development. The OSR5 system
    is faster than it was running on native hardware. The host system is a 1U
    Supermicro box with dual Opteron 2000s, 4GB RAM and 1.5TB of SATA drives
    with a 3ware 9550 controller.

    Most (all) of the OSR5 systems we have supported over the years are used
    for accounting applications that were adequately fast running on things as
    slow as Pentium 90s so VM virtual machines on adequate current hardware are
    going to be more than adequate. The only time ours gets really busy is
    when building software or backing up.

    I can't say how VMware hosted on Windows works as I do not ``Do Windows''.
    If I were to have a need to run Windows, I would do it in a VMware VM
    hosted on a Linux box where I could take snapshots to allow me to revert
    back to a working system when Windows gets borked.

    Bill
    --
    INTERNET: bill@celestial.com Bill Campbell; Celestial Software LLC
    URL: http://www.celestial.com/ PO Box 820; 6641 E. Mercer Way
    Voice: (206) 236-1676 Mercer Island, WA 98040-0820
    Fax: (206) 232-9186

    Foreign aid might be defined as a transfer from poor people in rich
    countries to rich people in poor countries -- Douglas Casey

  2. Re: Does 5.0.7 run well on modern hardware?

    On 30 Jul, 22:31, Bill Campbell wrote:
    > On Wed, Jul 30, 2008, Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    >
    > ...
    >
    > >Run OSR 5.0.x in VMware Workstation, using IDE emulation to make your
    > >life easier. This is what I'm doing for RHEL servers that require
    > >access to OSR 5.0.6. This avoids all the hardware component migration
    > >issues, leaves you free to re-allocate resources as needed, and lets
    > >you have access to both OS's at the same time. There is a serious
    > >performance hit on the emulated system, but I doubt you're
    > >overwhelming it with anything as the situation stands.

    >
    > I can't say I've seen a ``serious performance hit'' on the system we are
    > using here hosting one OS 5.0.6a system, and four active CentOS VMs with
    > different versions of CentOS that we use for development. *The OSR5 system
    > is faster than it was running on native hardware. *The host system is a1U
    > Supermicro box with dual Opteron 2000s, 4GB RAM and 1.5TB of SATA drives
    > with a 3ware 9550 controller.
    >
    > Most (all) of the OSR5 systems we have supported over the years are used
    > for accounting applications that were adequately fast running on things as
    > slow as Pentium 90s so VM virtual machines on adequate current hardware are
    > going to be more than adequate. *The only time ours gets really busy is
    > when building software or backing up.


    Ahh. I can see that. If you're doing seriously CPU and disk-churning
    work, such as large databases under serious processing load, the
    difference can be quite noticeable. Scaling up the speed of the CPU by
    a factor of 20 or so, as you've done, more than makes up for that.

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