File transfer with directory structures (second round) - SCO

This is a discussion on File transfer with directory structures (second round) - SCO ; I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5 server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new ...

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Thread: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

  1. File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:

    Signal 31 - core dumped
    # dfspace
    / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).

    Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).


    My file is:

    rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar

    I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    same directory structures.

    How can I do this ?

  2. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    smlunatick typed (on Mon, Apr 28, 2008 at 12:34:38PM -0700):
    | I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    | server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    | able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    | DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    | unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    | directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    | which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:
    |
    | Signal 31 - core dumped
    | # dfspace
    | / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    | /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).
    |
    | Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).
    |
    |
    | My file is:
    |
    | rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar
    |
    | I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    | "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    | same directory structures.
    |
    | How can I do this ?

    Have you tried rdist?

    --
    JP

  3. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    smlunatick wrote:
    > I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    > server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    > able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    > DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    > unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    > directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    > which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:


    One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use this
    approach:

    tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -)
    (from memory, you get the idea).

    Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh once
    finished.


    >
    > Signal 31 - core dumped
    > # dfspace
    > / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    > /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).
    >
    > Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).
    >
    >
    > My file is:
    >
    > rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar
    >
    > I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    > "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    > same directory structures.
    >
    > How can I do this ?




    --
    RGB

  4. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    RedGrittyBrick typed (on Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 10:22:49AM +0100):
    > One well-established way of moving large groups of files between computers
    > is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any intermediate files.
    > rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can temporarily set up the rsh
    > service on the other server you can use this approach:
    >
    > tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -)
    > (from memory, you get the idea).
    >
    > Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two systems
    > from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh once finished.


    In what way is that better than the 'rdist' command?

    --
    JP

  5. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    smlunatick wrote:
    > I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    > server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    > able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    > DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    > unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    > directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    > which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:
    >
    > Signal 31 - core dumped
    > # dfspace
    > / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    > /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).
    >
    > Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).
    >
    >
    > My file is:
    >
    > rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar
    >
    > I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    > "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    > same directory structures.
    >
    > How can I do this ?


    BackupEdge (www.microlite.com) has an option to use any machine with an
    FTP server as a backup 'device'. This might be what you need here. You
    can get 60 day full function demos at the web site.

    Disclaimer: UBB is a Microlite dealer.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Pat Welch, UBB Computer Services, a WCS Affiliate
    SCO Authorized Partner
    Microlite BackupEdge Certified Reseller
    Unix/Linux/Windows/Hardware Sales/Support
    (209) 745-1401 Cell: (209) 251-9120
    E-mail: patubb@inreach.com
    ----------------------------------------------------

  6. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    > RedGrittyBrick typed (on Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 10:22:49AM +0100):
    >> One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    >> computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    >> intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    >> temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use
    >> this approach:
    >>
    >> tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -) (from
    >> memory, you get the idea).
    >>
    >> Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    >> systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh
    >> once finished.

    >
    > In what way is that better than the 'rdist' command?
    >


    Why do you ask?


    Now that I think about it, rdist uses rcmd (or ssh which OP doesn't
    have). Therefore you have to get rshd running at the other end anyway.
    If the OP has rshd working and knows tar but not rdist, he doesn't need
    to learn rdist, a tool created primarily for the ongoing repeated
    synchronisation of files and file hierarchies between a master and
    multiple slaves.

    --
    RGB

  7. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    RedGrittyBrick typed (on Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 11:24:03AM +0100):
    > Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    >> RedGrittyBrick typed (on Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 10:22:49AM +0100):
    >>> One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    >>> computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    >>> intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    >>> temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use
    >>> this approach:
    >>>
    >>> tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -) (from
    >>> memory, you get the idea).
    >>>
    >>> Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    >>> systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh
    >>> once finished.

    >>
    >> In what way is that better than the 'rdist' command?
    >>

    >
    > Why do you ask?
    >
    > Now that I think about it, rdist uses rcmd (or ssh which OP doesn't have).
    > Therefore you have to get rshd running at the other end anyway. If the OP
    > has rshd working and knows tar but not rdist, he doesn't need to learn
    > rdist, a tool created primarily for the ongoing repeated synchronisation of
    > files and file hierarchies between a master and multiple slaves.


    A far better tool for repeated synchronisation is rsync, which is much
    faster than rdist.

    But tell me how hard could it possibly be to learn the simple command:

    rdist -c /path/to/files destination_computer

    to have /path/to/files copied to destination_computer?

    --
    JP

  8. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    Pat Welch typed (on Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 12:40:56AM -0700):
    > smlunatick wrote:
    >> I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    >> server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    >> able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    >> DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    >> unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    >> directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    >> which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:
    >>
    >> Signal 31 - core dumped
    >> # dfspace
    >> / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    >> /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).
    >>
    >> Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).
    >>
    >>
    >> My file is:
    >>
    >> rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar
    >>
    >> I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    >> "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    >> same directory structures.
    >>
    >> How can I do this ?

    >
    > BackupEdge (www.microlite.com) has an option to use any machine with an FTP
    > server as a backup 'device'. This might be what you need here. You can get
    > 60 day full function demos at the web site.


    This is NOT a solution to the problem.

    > Disclaimer: UBB is a Microlite dealer.


    Given that Disclaimer, Pat, you should know that what you get on the
    ftp server is a set of backup archives, which in no way constitute a
    filesystem into which you can delve with standard Unix commands.

    --
    JP

  9. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    > RedGrittyBrick typed (on Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 11:24:03AM +0100):
    >> Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    >>> RedGrittyBrick typed (on Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 10:22:49AM +0100):
    >>>> One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    >>>> computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    >>>> intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    >>>> temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use
    >>>> this approach:
    >>>>
    >>>> tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -) (from
    >>>> memory, you get the idea).
    >>>>
    >>>> Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    >>>> systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh
    >>>> once finished.
    >>> In what way is that better than the 'rdist' command?
    >>>

    >> Why do you ask?



    >>
    >> Now that I think about it, rdist uses rcmd (or ssh which OP doesn't have).
    >> Therefore you have to get rshd running at the other end anyway. If the OP
    >> has rshd working and knows tar but not rdist, he doesn't need to learn
    >> rdist, a tool created primarily for the ongoing repeated synchronisation of
    >> files and file hierarchies between a master and multiple slaves.

    >
    > A far better tool for repeated synchronisation is rsync, which is much
    > faster than rdist.


    Sure, and it is one I use a lot. However

    1) The OP's failing machine is unlikely to have rsync already installed
    and since the OP seems unwilling to try to install SSH, it seems no more
    likely that the OP would want to install rsync.

    2) AIUI The main way in which rsync is faster than rdist is that rsync,
    for large files in which a small part has changed, only sends deltas.
    This doesn't apply in the OP's situation.

    3) The OP hasn't stated that transfer speed is of the essence.

    4) Why bother installing rsync, for an urgent one-off file hierarchy
    copy, when adequate tools are already there?

    >
    > But tell me how hard could it possibly be to learn the simple command:
    >
    > rdist -c /path/to/files destination_computer
    >
    > to have /path/to/files copied to destination_computer?
    >


    About as hard as, when replying to the OP, to type
    "rdist -c /path/to/files destination_computer"
    instead of
    "Have you tried rdist?"

    I love rhetorical questions :-)


    Frankly I don't think there was anything wrong with your original
    suggestion and am puzzled why you seem to consider it impertinent for
    anyone to supplement it with an alternative option.

    --
    RGB

  10. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    > Pat Welch typed (on Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 12:40:56AM -0700):
    >> smlunatick wrote:
    >>> I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    >>> server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    >>> able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    >>> DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    >>> unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    >>> directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    >>> which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:
    >>>
    >>> Signal 31 - core dumped
    >>> # dfspace
    >>> / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    >>> /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).
    >>>
    >>> Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> My file is:
    >>>
    >>> rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar
    >>>
    >>> I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    >>> "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    >>> same directory structures.
    >>>
    >>> How can I do this ?

    >> BackupEdge (www.microlite.com) has an option to use any machine with an FTP
    >> server as a backup 'device'. This might be what you need here. You can get
    >> 60 day full function demos at the web site.

    >
    > This is NOT a solution to the problem.
    >
    >> Disclaimer: UBB is a Microlite dealer.

    >
    > Given that Disclaimer, Pat, you should know that what you get on the
    > ftp server is a set of backup archives, which in no way constitute a
    > filesystem into which you can delve with standard Unix commands.
    >


    I understand that - but Edge has some very interesting and powerful
    options to handle his needs.

    I do this all the time when I'm upgrading failing 5.0.5 systems that may
    have critical application programs 'polluted' all over in dirs they
    really should not be in, but are.

    And I may not be familiar with the applications involved - but we have
    to get the data off NOW (smoke figuratively if not literally coming out
    of the old system). Tape drives may be dead or incompatible, but the NIC
    still works, so FTP is the best option.

    There are Z options on the backup that tell Edge to resolve all symlinks
    relative the current root, and backup the symlinked source files as well
    as the symlinks.

    Then over on the new system with 5.0.7 or 6.0.0 (or even Linux), more Z
    options tell Edge to restore the full backup, *BUT* change the effective
    root to something like /usr4/oldsystem/ and remake all symlinks relative
    to the new root on the fly during the restore.

    Then you have a complete copy of the old OS and applications with all
    the system and config files you may need to consult in bringing the
    application up on the new system.

    And it's completely isolated from your new machines SCO or Linux OS.

    VERY slick.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Pat Welch, UBB Computer Services, a WCS Affiliate
    SCO Authorized Partner
    Microlite BackupEdge Certified Reseller
    Unix/Linux/Windows/Hardware Sales/Support
    (209) 745-1401 Cell: (209) 251-9120
    E-mail: patubb@inreach.com
    ----------------------------------------------------

  11. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    On Apr 29, 5:22*am, RedGrittyBrick
    wrote:
    > smlunatick wrote:
    > > I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    > > server. *I have a replacement server waiting. *I can not seem to be
    > > able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    > > DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    > > unit. *I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    > > directories and copied them ove. *However, I have a huge directory
    > > which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:

    >
    > One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    > computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    > intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    > temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use this
    > approach:
    >
    > tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -)
    > (from memory, you get the idea).
    >
    > Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    > systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh once
    > finished.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > *Signal 31 - core dumped
    > > # dfspace
    > > / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    > > /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).

    >
    > > Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).

    >
    > > My file is:

    >
    > > rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar

    >
    > > I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    > > "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    > > same directory structures.

    >
    > > How can I do this ?

    >
    > --
    > RGB- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Tried rcmd with tar and I get "permission denied"

    Any other configurations needed?

  12. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)

    smlunatick typed (on Fri, May 02, 2008 at 12:40:45PM -0700):
    | On Apr 29, 5:22*am, RedGrittyBrick
    | wrote:
    | > smlunatick wrote:
    | > > I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    | > > server. *I have a replacement server waiting. *I can not seem to be
    | > > able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    | > > DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    | > > unit. *I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    | > > directories and copied them ove. *However, I have a huge directory
    | > > which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:
    | >
    | > One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    | > computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    | > intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    | > temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use this
    | > approach:
    | >
    | > tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -)
    | > (from memory, you get the idea).
    | >
    | > Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    | > systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh once
    | > finished.
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | > > *Signal 31 - core dumped
    | > > # dfspace
    | > > / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    | > > /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).
    | >
    | > > Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).
    | >
    | > > My file is:
    | >
    | > > rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar
    | >
    | > > I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    | > > "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    | > > same directory structures.
    | >
    | > > How can I do this ?
    | >
    | > --
    | > RGB- Hide quoted text -
    | >
    | > - Show quoted text -
    |
    | Tried rcmd with tar and I get "permission denied"
    |
    | Any other configurations needed?

    Yes.
    Is the rcmd man page too obtuse?

    --
    JP

  13. Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "smlunatick"
    Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    To:
    Sent: Friday, May 02, 2008 3:40 PM
    Subject: Re: File transfer with directory structures (second round)


    On Apr 29, 5:22 am, RedGrittyBrick
    wrote:
    > smlunatick wrote:
    > > I need to copy files and data off a "failing" SCO OpenServer 5.0.5
    > > server. I have a replacement server waiting. I can not seem to be
    > > able to read the older DAT 8i 4/8GB DAT 2 tapes on my new IBM Gen. 5
    > > DAT 72 drive since the tape cartridges constantly eject from the
    > > unit. I have successfully created "tar" files for my small
    > > directories and copied them ove. However, I have a huge directory
    > > which will not create an "tar" or "cpio" file:

    >
    > One well-established way of moving large groups of files between
    > computers is to combine rcmd with tar so as to avoid creating any
    > intermediate files. rcmd is standard on OpenServer so if you can
    > temporarily set up the rsh service on the other server you can use this
    > approach:
    >
    > tar cf - ./bigdir | rcmd newserver (cd somewhere; tar xf -)
    > (from memory, you get the idea).
    >
    > Obviously rsh is a security hazard so I'd want to isolate the two
    > systems from the outside world whilst doing this and disable rsh once
    > finished.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Signal 31 - core dumped
    > > # dfspace
    > > / : Disk space: 11026.95 MB of 17389.48 MB available (63.41%).
    > > /stand : Disk space: 5.01 MB of 14.99 MB available (33.44%).

    >
    > > Total Disk Space: 11031.97 MB of 17404.48 MB available (63.39%).

    >
    > > My file is:

    >
    > > rw------- 1 root sys 1073741312 Apr 25 11:03 file.tar

    >
    > > I do not have 'ssh' installed on this failing server and the
    > > "standard" FTP does not appeare to transfer the file witht he exact
    > > same directory structures.

    >
    > > How can I do this ?

    >
    > --
    > RGB- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Tried rcmd with tar and I get "permission denied"

    Any other configurations needed?

    -------------------

    Well, sure, the r-services (rlogin/rexec/rsh) all require user-equivalency
    (also called rhost authentication) set up correctly. Thats just part of
    using them at all. Generally when I try to use a utility or service I'm not
    familiar with for the first time, I try to consult the man pages and/or
    google about it, both of which would have told you, admitedly perhaps not
    clearly or succinctly, but something, about what must be done bfore "rcmd
    foo ..." can work.

    But whatever, I'm only very behind right now, not staggeringly critically
    behind, so I can stop and write down what's already out there to be found...

    Say boxa is the rcmd server and boxb is the rcmd client.
    You will run the rcmd command on boxb to connect to boxa.
    Say boxa is 10.0.0.30 and boxb is 10.0.0.40

    boxa needs (for root user):

    /etc/hosts:
    10.0.0.40 boxb

    /.rhosts:
    boxb

    chmod 600 /.rhosts

    uncomment "shell" in /etc/inetd.conf, which it probably already is.
    But if it wasn't then afterwards run: /etc/tcp stop ; /etc/tcp start

    Now test.
    boxa:~ # touch This_is_box_A

    boxb:~ # rcmd boxa ls

    Unless I forgot something you should get a listing of root's home dir on
    boxa.

    Thats really not quite correct either. This does describe a working
    arrangement but it's false to say that this is THE way.
    What goes into /.rhosts is "whatever the client IP will resolve as" and it
    must resolve to some name not just an ip.
    So, if you have a local dns server or if the client box is coming in from
    the internet and has a working reverse dns record, then you could put that
    name in there. creating a dummy hostname in /etc/hosts is just a brute force
    way to satisfy it.

    If this was for any other user than root, then instead of /.rhosts, you
    would put "boxb" into /etc/hosts.equiv, and then you would have to ensure
    that the user of the same name exists on both boxa and boxb. root of course
    always exists on all boxes so you don't have to remember to worry about that
    for root.

    --
    Brian K. White brian@aljex.com http://www.myspace.com/KEYofR
    +++++[>+++[>+++++>+++++++<<-]<-]>>+.>.+++++.+++++++.-.[>+<---]>++.
    filePro BBx Linux SCO FreeBSD #callahans Satriani Filk!


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