Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice - SCO

This is a discussion on Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice - SCO ; I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc. running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. The server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. I am concerned about ...

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  1. Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc.
    running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. The
    server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. I am concerned
    about the need to replace the server before a hardware failure creates a
    crisis, as I figure most hardware is good for about 5 years and we are near
    that. Mysis would prefer (naturally) that I migrate to a different software
    they offer that is GUI instead of character based, although they still
    support our product. The OS on our server is OS 5.07. How realistic is it
    that I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load OS
    5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software support for their
    product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's financial problems. Our
    vender's solution is considerably more expensive, but has the advantaage
    that they will support the new hardware and software. All thoughts
    appreciated.

    Marty Rubenstein, MD



  2. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    Martin Rubenstein wrote:
    > I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc.
    > running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. The
    > server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. I am concerned
    > about the need to replace the server before a hardware failure creates a
    > crisis, as I figure most hardware is good for about 5 years and we are near
    > that. Mysis would prefer (naturally) that I migrate to a different software
    > they offer that is GUI instead of character based, although they still
    > support our product. The OS on our server is OS 5.07. How realistic is it
    > that I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load OS
    > 5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software support for their
    > product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's financial problems. Our
    > vender's solution is considerably more expensive, but has the advantaage
    > that they will support the new hardware and software. All thoughts
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Marty Rubenstein, MD
    >
    >


    I would recommend an HP server using SAS RAID-5, perhaps the ML-350.

    They still actively support SCO through their EFS value-add for SCO 5.0.7.

    Make sure you apply the MP5 SCO patch right after the initial load
    (you'll need the BTLD diskette for the hpsas driver from the EFS
    material) and after EFS has been installed.

    A whitebox Intel system may or may not work, depending on things like
    shared video memory (does NOT work for SCO).

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Pat Welch, UBB Computer Services, a WCS Affiliate
    SCO Authorized Partner
    Microlite BackupEdge Certified Reseller
    Unix/Linux/Windows/Hardware Sales/Support
    (209) 745-1401 Cell: (209) 251-9120
    E-mail: patubb@inreach.com
    ----------------------------------------------------

  3. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    Martin Rubenstein wrote:
    > I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc.
    > running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. The
    > server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. I am concerned
    > about the need to replace the server before a hardware failure creates a
    > crisis, as I figure most hardware is good for about 5 years and we are near
    > that. Mysis would prefer (naturally) that I migrate to a different software
    > they offer that is GUI instead of character based, although they still
    > support our product. The OS on our server is OS 5.07. How realistic is it
    > that I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load OS
    > 5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software support for their
    > product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's financial problems. Our
    > vender's solution is considerably more expensive, but has the advantaage
    > that they will support the new hardware and software. All thoughts
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Marty Rubenstein, MD
    >
    >
    >

    Marty,

    I have a medical office client running SCO 5.0.7 on a SuberMicro system that
    I built for them. RAID-5, SCSI SCA drives in hotplug carriers. The machine
    is about 4 years old now and soon SCA drives will become hard to find as
    disk manufactures are moving to Serial Attached SCSI (see Pat's post).

    But back to your question: Is 5.0.7 good to keep running? I'd say yes.

    But what is your disaster plan? If the box goes down how are you going
    to get it back up?

    A lot depends on how your users are connecting to the box: MS Windows
    machines with a terminal emulator program connecting over TCP/IP, or
    green screen Wyse serial terminals?

    How are your printers connected? Networked print servers or serial?

    What are you using for backing up your system? Are you backing up
    to tape? DVD RW? IOmega REV? Over the network to a FTP server?

    I have another client with one of my SuperMicro boxes with a single
    2.8GHz Xeon, 1G RAM, running 5.0.7 without RAID, just a single
    disk on the Adapted ad320 SCSI controller. A law office with
    25 users accessing the main app on the UNIX box as well as
    using the UNIX box as a file and print server for the Windows
    Network.

    We tested the disaster recovery plan by renting an off the shelf P4
    system with 1G RAM and onboard Intel NIC. Bought a second IOMega REV drive
    and an PATA IDE hard disk. I pulled the rented system's hard disk
    and installed the IDE REV drive and new IDE hard disk, booted
    the nightly backup REV media with the RE2 boot image and restored
    the Backup Edge full system backup to the hard disk. I took about
    four hours to get the box up and running from opening it to
    swap the IDE hard disk and install the REV drive until the users were
    able to login via the network and resume normal work.

    The IDE disk and REV drive we bought for this test have been
    boxed up and placed in the bank safety deposit box. Should it be
    necessary, we can install the disk and REV drive in a new
    box, boot 5.0.7 and simply restore the application data files
    and users Word processing documents and Excel files.

    Using an off the shelf PC as a interim server while a permanent
    replacement server is procured recognizes that in a disaster
    (fire, flood, theft, etc) it could take a week or more to
    duplicate the hardware in the production server.

    You can do the same. You could do it as simply as a spare
    hard disk and backup drive. Or you could buy a new or used
    system identical to the existing system and keep it off
    site as a cold backup.




    --
    Steve Fabac
    S.M. Fabac & Associates
    816/765-1670

  4. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    On 6 Mar, 00:04, "Martin Rubenstein" wrote:
    > I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc.
    > running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. *The
    > server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. *I am concerned
    > about the need to replace the server before a hardware failure creates a
    > crisis, as I figure most hardware is good for about 5 years and we are near
    > that. *Mysis would prefer (naturally) that I migrate to a different software
    > they offer that is GUI instead of character based, although they still
    > support our product. *The OS on our server is OS 5.07. *How realistic is it
    > that I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load OS
    > 5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software support for their
    > product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's financial problems. *Our
    > vender's solution is considerably more expensive, but has the advantaage
    > that they will support the new hardware and software. *All thoughts
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Marty Rubenstein, MD


    Virtualize it on VMware Workstation 6 or better. Get away fromt the
    hardware compatibility problems of a company in bankruptcy and an out
    of date OS. Any contemporary server should be able to run this quite
    comfortably under Linux or even Windows: I'm doing this right now.

  5. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    On Mar 6, 1:04 am, "Martin Rubenstein" wrote:
    > I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc.
    > running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. The
    > server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. I am concerned
    > about the need to replace the server before a hardware failure creates a
    > crisis, as I figure most hardware is good for about 5 years and we are near
    > that. Mysis would prefer (naturally) that I migrate to a different software
    > they offer that is GUI instead of character based, although they still
    > support our product. The OS on our server is OS 5.07. How realistic is it
    > that I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load OS
    > 5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software support for their
    > product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's financial problems. Our
    > vender's solution is considerably more expensive, but has the advantaage
    > that they will support the new hardware and software. All thoughts
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Marty Rubenstein, MD


    At least one major server vendor, HP, still sells new servers that can
    run SCO OpenServer 5.0.7, and are certified for that OS. I am not sure
    about other vendors, since all Intel/AMD based servers I've dealt with
    recently were HP. For example, task of installing 5.0.7 on ProLiant
    DL380 G5 is doable, from my recent personal experience. I had to use
    external USB optical drive and floppy (broader described in another
    thread in this news group).

    The other option is to use virtualization like VMWare Server or
    Workstation on some Linux or Windows. That is also doable. You should
    just check if it is supported by your vendor(s). I am not sure if
    OpenServer is supported on VMWare officially.

    Darko Krstic

  6. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    On 6 Mar, 19:27, darko wrote:
    > On Mar 6, 1:04 am, "Martin Rubenstein" wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments, etc.
    > > running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by Mysis. *The
    > > server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS.. *I am concerned
    > > about the need to replace the server before a hardware failure creates a
    > > crisis, as I figure most hardware is good for about 5 years and we are near
    > > that. *Mysis would prefer (naturally) that I migrate to a different software
    > > they offer that is GUI instead of character based, although they still
    > > support our product. *The OS on our server is OS 5.07. *How realistic is it
    > > that I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load OS
    > > 5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software support for their
    > > product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's financial problems. *Our
    > > vender's solution is considerably more expensive, but has the advantaage
    > > that they will support the new hardware and software. *All thoughts
    > > appreciated.

    >
    > > Marty Rubenstein, MD

    >
    > At least one major server vendor, HP, still sells new servers that can
    > run SCO OpenServer 5.0.7, and are certified for that OS. I am not sure
    > about other vendors, since all Intel/AMD based servers I've dealt with
    > recently were HP. For example, task of installing 5.0.7 on ProLiant
    > DL380 G5 is doable, from my recent personal experience. I had to use
    > external USB optical drive and floppy (broader described in another
    > thread in this news group).
    >
    > The other option is to use virtualization like VMWare Server or
    > Workstation on some Linux or Windows. That is also doable. You should
    > just check if it is supported by your vendor(s). I am not sure if
    > OpenServer is supported on VMWare officially.
    >
    > Darko Krstic- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Just because a server is "compatible" doesn't mean you can get it to
    work. I've been doing hardware evaluations and integrations with
    various OS's since BSD 4.1, and I've got to say that SCO configuration
    harkens back to the bad old '80's of having to know the answer to
    everything in advance. including details of SCSI configuration and
    driver installations that any modern OS either auto-detects or has
    decent probe tools to detect. The result is that adding peripherals,
    such as tape drives, external USB drives, graphics tablets, or
    slightly unusual monitors is awkward if not impossible. And it's only
    going to get worse.

    Virtualizing lets you sidestep these problems and leave them with a
    current operating system capable of handling contemporary hardware,
    and allows trivial transfer of your entire virtualized operating
    system to an arbitrary virtualization server. It also installs in a
    fraction of the time, because the underlying OS and hardware do the
    bad block management for you and that *AMAZINGLY* slow OpenServer disk
    configuration tools stays the heck out of your way.

  7. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    On Thu, 6 Mar 2008, Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    > On 6 Mar, 19:27, darko wrote:
    > > On Mar 6, 1:04 am, "Martin Rubenstein" wrote:
    > > > I have a medical practice with all of our billing, appointments,
    > > > etc. running on a proprietary software called Script Systems by
    > > > Mysis. *The server is a 4 year old IBM eServer with OS 5.07 as OS..
    > > > *I am concerned about the need to replace the server before a
    > > > hardware failure creates a crisis, as I figure most hardware is good
    > > > for about 5 years and we are near that. *Mysis would prefer
    > > > (naturally) that I migrate to a different software they offer that
    > > > is GUI instead of character based, although they still support our
    > > > product. *The OS on our server is OS 5.07. *How realistic is it that
    > > > I stick to our prior method of buying an Intel based server and load
    > > > OS 5.07 and our data myself, and have Mysis still do software
    > > > support for their product (but not hardware or OS) given Sco's
    > > > financial problems. *Our vender's solution is considerably more
    > > > expensive, but has the advantaage that they will support the new
    > > > hardware and software. *All thoughts appreciated.


    The information is given. The OP knows that the SW is only supported on
    the SCO OS. He is asking for assistance with a specific problem.

    > > At least one major server vendor, HP, still sells new servers that can
    > > run SCO OpenServer 5.0.7, and are certified for that OS. I am not sure
    > > about other vendors, since all Intel/AMD based servers I've dealt with
    > > recently were HP. For example, task of installing 5.0.7 on ProLiant
    > > DL380 G5 is doable, from my recent personal experience. I had to use
    > > external USB optical drive and floppy (broader described in another
    > > thread in this news group).
    > >
    > > The other option is to use virtualization like VMWare Server or
    > > Workstation on some Linux or Windows. That is also doable. You should
    > > just check if it is supported by your vendor(s). I am not sure if
    > > OpenServer is supported on VMWare officially.


    OpenServer is not supported by VMWare. So taking it to a virtualized
    state causes the SW to become unsupported by the vendor.

    > Just because a server is "compatible" doesn't mean you can get it to
    > work. I've been doing hardware evaluations and integrations with various
    > OS's since BSD 4.1, and I've got to say that SCO configuration harkens
    > back to the bad old '80's of having to know the answer to everything in
    > advance. including details of SCSI configuration and driver
    > installations that any modern OS either auto-detects or has decent probe
    > tools to detect. The result is that adding peripherals, such as tape
    > drives, external USB drives, graphics tablets, or slightly unusual
    > monitors is awkward if not impossible. And it's only going to get worse.


    That is why there is OpenServer 6. It does not have the old knowledge is
    required to get the devices working. Sadly the market has to provide for
    clueless Admins, that do no understand UNIX.

    > Virtualizing lets you sidestep these problems and leave them with a
    > current operating system capable of handling contemporary hardware, and
    > allows trivial transfer of your entire virtualized operating system to
    > an arbitrary virtualization server. It also installs in a fraction of
    > the time, because the underlying OS and hardware do the bad block
    > management for you and that *AMAZINGLY* slow OpenServer disk
    > configuration tools stays the heck out of your way.


    Yes, but it is a non supported configuration by the vendor. And yes I use
    virtualization. But to report problems to the vendor you have to follow
    their rules. Some out right reject any thing done virtually. Sadly we
    have to follow vendor rules to get bugs fixed. What you need to realize
    is that there are various target audiences. We have to address them.

    The SoftWare Applications chooses the OS. We have to look at what is best
    for the OP/business. Not pick a ...


    --
    Boyd Gerber
    ZENEZ 1042 East Fort Union #135, Midvale Utah 84047

  8. Re: Openserver 5.07 and a medical practice

    On 7 Mar, 00:54, Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    > On 6 Mar, 19:27, darko wrote:
    >
    > > At least one major server vendor, HP, still sells new servers that can
    > > run SCO OpenServer 5.0.7, and are certified for that OS. I am not sure
    > > about other vendors, since all Intel/AMD based servers I've dealt with
    > > recently were HP.

    >
    > Just because a server is "compatible" doesn't mean you can get it to
    > work.


    Nico,

    Darko said that HP servers are Certified with SCO products, not that
    they are "compatible".

    SCO Certified Hardware has been certified by SCO's Engineering
    Services team
    in conjunction with the hardware vendor to ensure inter-operability.
    SCO is the
    initial contact point for any issues discovered with hardware listed
    as Certified.
    If the problem can be duplicated, SCO will escalate the issue to the
    vendor and
    will work together with the vendor for resolution of the issue.

    Compatible Hardware is hardware that is reported to work with the
    product based
    on driver availability, but has not been certified, nor is supported
    by SCO or
    the manufacturer.

    > I've been doing hardware evaluations and integrations with
    > various OS's since BSD 4.1, and I've got to say that SCO configuration
    > harkens back to the bad old '80's of having to know the answer to
    > everything in advance. including details of SCSI configuration and
    > driver installations that any modern OS either auto-detects or has
    > decent probe tools to detect.


    I suspect that your experiences are based on versions of the SCO
    Operating System that are not current. The latest version of SCO
    OpenServer and UnixWare auto-detect Host Bus Adapters, storage
    peripherals, Network cards and Graphics cards at installation time.

    If you want to evaluate OpenServer 6.0.0 for example, you can download
    it from:

    http://www.sco.com/support/update/do...se.php?rid=161

    > The result is that adding peripherals,
    > such as tape drives, external USB drives, graphics tablets, or
    > slightly unusual monitors is awkward if not impossible. And it's only
    > going to get worse.


    OpenServer 6 and UnixWare 7 both autodetect Tape drives and support
    both SCSI Hot adding of these devices to a running server.

    USB devices are autodetected either at boot time, if they are already
    in the machine, or ar runtime, if they are connected to a running
    server.

    As to monitors on OpenServer 6 we use the X.org X Server and I think
    this
    is the same X Server that is used in BSD?

    > Virtualizing lets you sidestep these problems and leave them with a
    > current operating system capable of handling contemporary hardware,
    > and allows trivial transfer of your entire virtualized operating
    > system to an arbitrary virtualization server. It also installs in a
    > fraction of the time, because the underlying OS and hardware do the
    > bad block management for you and that *AMAZINGLY* slow OpenServer disk
    > configuration tools stays the heck out of your way.


    Next time you are installing an old OpenServer 5 system you can avoid
    bad tracking by selecting the Bad tracking option:

    * None

    during the installation. Bad tracking is a legacy option for older
    hardware.

    Regards,

    John

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