queuedefs - SCO

This is a discussion on queuedefs - SCO ; I've been asked to look in on an OSR 5.0.6 site where for the last few days, /etc/cron dies and has to be restarted. The site has several dozen entries in assorted crontab tables; someone installed the following as /usr/lib/cron/queuedefs: ...

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Thread: queuedefs

  1. queuedefs

    I've been asked to look in on an OSR 5.0.6 site where for the last few
    days, /etc/cron dies and has to be restarted.

    The site has several dozen entries in assorted crontab tables; someone
    installed the following as /usr/lib/cron/queuedefs:

    a.4j1n
    b.2j2n90w
    c.1j2n60w
    d.1j2n60w
    e.1j2n60w
    f.1j2n60w
    g.1j2n60w
    h.1j2n60w
    i.1j2n60w
    j.1j2n60w
    k.1j2n60w


    I've pored over the queuedefs man page, but I do not really grasp the
    implications of those entries. If I turn on cron logging, I do see far
    more log entries like this one:

    ! c queue max run limit reached Wed Mar 5 18:39:00 2008
    ! rescheduling a cron job Wed Mar 5 18:39:00 2008

    than entries reflecting actual launching of tasks.

    --
    JP

  2. Re: queuedefs

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:
    > I've been asked to look in on an OSR 5.0.6 site where for the last few
    > days, /etc/cron dies and has to be restarted.
    >
    > The site has several dozen entries in assorted crontab tables; someone
    > installed the following as /usr/lib/cron/queuedefs:
    >
    > a.4j1n
    > b.2j2n90w
    > c.1j2n60w
    > d.1j2n60w
    > e.1j2n60w
    > f.1j2n60w
    > g.1j2n60w
    > h.1j2n60w
    > i.1j2n60w
    > j.1j2n60w
    > k.1j2n60w
    >
    >
    > I've pored over the queuedefs man page, but I do not really grasp the
    > implications of those entries. If I turn on cron logging, I do see far
    > more log entries like this one:
    >
    > ! c queue max run limit reached Wed Mar 5 18:39:00 2008
    > ! rescheduling a cron job Wed Mar 5 18:39:00 2008
    >
    > than entries reflecting actual launching of tasks.
    >


    JP,

    I've used UNIX since 1973 at AT&T (Unix system III). I've been the
    administrator on SCO Xenix systems since 1987. I've been administering
    and working with SCO UNIX since 1995, I've never used AT or BATCH jobs.
    I only say this to point out that with UNIX you can learn something
    new every day!

    From the batch man page:
    -q letter
    Places the specified job in a queue denoted by letter,
    where letter is any lowercase letter from ``a'' to ``z''.
    The queue letter is appended to the job identifier. The
    following letters have special significance:
    a
    at queue
    b
    batch queue
    c
    cron queue
    For more information on the use of different queues, see
    the queuedefs(F) manual page.

    I think that whoever set up the /usr/lib/cron/queuedefs file made a
    mistake by adding the c.1j2n60w line. The 1j will likely override
    the default of 100 jobs queued by cron. On my 5.0.7 the default
    queuedefs only has the following:

    # less /usr/lib/cron/queuedefs
    a.4j1n
    b.2j2n90w
    /usr/lib/cron/queuedefs (END)

    Then I got to thinking "why the d, e, f, g, h, etc... entry's"?

    Googling queuedefs on c.u.s.m turns up:

    > Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
    > From: Mark
    > Date: 2000/03/21
    > Subject: Re: Batch Queues
    > In article <38D7FE2A.2BF94...@aplawrence.com>,
    >
    > Tony Lawrence wrote:
    >> Mark wrote:

    >
    >> > My company recently converted off of a Prime system to a IBM NetFinity
    >> > box running SCO Openserver 5.0.5. The problem I'm now experiencing is
    >> > with the batch queue. I currently only have the three standard queues,
    >> > AT, BATCH & CRON. I would like to split my user community requests to
    >> > multiple batch queues but I've been unsuccessful in finding out how I
    >> > can do this. Can anyone offer some help in this endeavor??

    >
    >
    >> Not sure I understand what you want- you do understand that
    >> each user has their own separate queue for each of those?
    >> And that the root user can put jobs out to be run by any
    >> user? See http://aplawrence.com/Unixart/cron.html also.
    >> --
    >> Tony Lawrence (t...@aplawrence.com)

    >
    > Tony,
    >
    > What I'm trying to do is allow certain groups of users to send all of
    > their batch requests to one queue while others go to another. We
    > currently have all requests going to queue b. Unfortunately, if we get
    > a couple of large reports running, the queue might be locked up for an
    > extended period. Some other users then try to submit a small job that
    > will kick out in 10 seconds or less and they get hung waiting for the
    > queue to open up.
    >
    >
    > I currently have my batch queue to allow for 2 jobs. I would prefer to
    > have 4 queues each allowing for 1 job. The question is how do I get the
    > submissions (this is transparent to the users) for a batch job to go to
    > a queue other than the standard batch? All of my users batch requests
    > go immediately to this queue and not to a queue for each user.
    >
    >
    > Thanks for your help!
    > Mark
    >


    So at minimum, I'd drop the 'c' line in your queuedefs.

    And, I may be all wet.



    --
    Steve Fabac
    S.M. Fabac & Associates
    816/765-1670

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