remote printer setup - SCO

This is a discussion on remote printer setup - SCO ; hi all, my sco os5.0.06 box has a network address of 10.100.100.10. i need to setup a printer that has an ip address of 10.100.120.50 so that i can print from the sco box to the printer. i need some ...

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Thread: remote printer setup

  1. remote printer setup

    hi all,

    my sco os5.0.06 box has a network address of 10.100.100.10. i need to
    setup a printer that has an ip address of 10.100.120.50 so that i can print
    from the sco box to the printer. i need some help with this one. i have
    setup remote printers sucessfully when they are on the same network as my
    sco box but i have never tried to do this type of printer setup before. so
    before i mess it up, i thought i had better ask first.

    will some kind soul point me in the right direction.

    thanks a lot!



  2. Re: remote printer setup

    Rick wrote:
    > hi all,
    >
    > my sco os5.0.06 box has a network address of 10.100.100.10. i need to
    > setup a printer that has an ip address of 10.100.120.50 so that i can print
    > from the sco box to the printer. i need some help with this one. i have
    > setup remote printers sucessfully when they are on the same network as my
    > sco box but i have never tried to do this type of printer setup before. so
    > before i mess it up, i thought i had better ask first.
    >
    > will some kind soul point me in the right direction.
    >
    > thanks a lot!
    >
    >
    >


    Everything depends upon the class of your network. If your 10.xxx.xxx.xxx network
    is a class A (netmask 255.0.0.0) then you should be able to ping the printer
    (built in print server?) without a specific route.

    If you can ping the printer you should be able to print to it. If you can't ping it,
    then you likely have used subnets in the 10.xxx.xxx.xxx space and need to set up
    a route to the 10.100.120 segment from the 10.100.100 segment:

    route add -net 10.100.120. 10.100.100.xxx < where xxx is the gateway to your WAN

    If you have a gateway set up, and you still can't ping, then it's likely that
    the IP setup on the printer does not specify the gateway on the 10.100.120
    network to get the ping back to 10.100.100.50.


    --
    Steve Fabac
    S.M. Fabac & Associates
    816/765-1670

  3. Re: remote printer setup

    On Feb 25, 4:38*am, "Rick" wrote:
    > hi all,
    >
    > my sco os5.0.06 box has a network address of *10.100.100.10. *i need to
    > setup a printer that has an ip address of 10.100.120.50 so that i can print
    > from the sco box to the printer. i need some help with this one. i have
    > setup remote printers sucessfully when they are on the same network as my
    > sco box but i have never tried to do this type of printer setup before. so
    > before i mess it up, i thought i had better ask first.
    >
    > will some kind soul point me in the right direction.
    >
    > thanks a lot!


    Hmm - thats tricky on the info provided

    both devices are of the form 10.100.X.X

    For them to communicate successfully on a common LAN you need to set
    the netmask for both devices something like 255.255.0.0 or 255.0.0.0

    BUT

    The fact you say that it is remote printing and that the addresses are
    seemingly different subnets and that you havent suggested changing the
    printer IP address as an option could suggest that there is a router
    or WAN in between your SCO box and the destination printer? I am not
    sure what network lies between the devices.

    If routers and a WAN is joining these two networks then you need to
    make sure that both devices have an appropriate gateway configured on
    their interfaces and that the gateway routers are correctly configured
    to route the required traffic...... Perhaps you could supply further
    information about the network topology separating these devices? - it
    really makes a difference to the direction to point you.

    Regards

    James

  4. Re: remote printer setup

    James_Szabadics wrote:
    > On Feb 25, 4:38 am, "Rick" wrote:
    >> hi all,
    >>
    >> my sco os5.0.06 box has a network address of 10.100.100.10. i need to
    >> setup a printer that has an ip address of 10.100.120.50 so that i can print
    >> from the sco box to the printer. i need some help with this one. i have
    >> setup remote printers sucessfully when they are on the same network as my
    >> sco box but i have never tried to do this type of printer setup before. so
    >> before i mess it up, i thought i had better ask first.
    >>
    >> will some kind soul point me in the right direction.
    >>
    >> thanks a lot!

    >
    > Hmm - thats tricky on the info provided
    >
    > both devices are of the form 10.100.X.X
    >
    > For them to communicate successfully on a common LAN you need to set
    > the netmask for both devices something like 255.255.0.0 or 255.0.0.0
    >
    > BUT
    >
    > The fact you say that it is remote printing and that the addresses are
    > seemingly different subnets and that you havent suggested changing the
    > printer IP address as an option could suggest that there is a router
    > or WAN in between your SCO box and the destination printer? I am not
    > sure what network lies between the devices.
    >
    > If routers and a WAN is joining these two networks then you need to
    > make sure that both devices have an appropriate gateway configured on
    > their interfaces and that the gateway routers are correctly configured
    > to route the required traffic...... Perhaps you could supply further
    > information about the network topology separating these devices? - it
    > really makes a difference to the direction to point you.
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > James


    To get the necessary info, use the "ifconfig" command to look up the settings
    of all your network ports and look at the netmasks to see if you should be
    able to reach it without a gateway. If the device is on a different network,
    try to ping it, or use the command "route -n" to see if your router is set up
    for you to reach it. This information is correct for all UNIX and UNIX-like
    operating systems, not just SCO: for Windows, it's "ipconfig /all" you need to
    use, and "ping" works for all the systems.

    It's easy to forget to point out to a new person dealing with such fun and
    games as network configurations how to find out what they need.

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