OMG, netBook discontinued - Scion

This is a discussion on OMG, netBook discontinued - Scion ; Whatever happened to RON? --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system ( http://www.grisoft.com ). Version: 6.0.560 / Virus Database: 352 - Release Date: 08/01/2004...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 49

Thread: OMG, netBook discontinued

  1. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Whatever happened to RON?




    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.560 / Virus Database: 352 - Release Date: 08/01/2004



  2. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Graham Thurlwell wrote:

    > On the 3 Jan 2004, real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet (Rowland
    > McDonnell) wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > But I have a need for 'net access and typesetting and suchlike.
    > > What choice do I have?

    >
    > How about a RISC OS machine?


    It's like this: compare the amount of TeX-related software available for
    Unix to that with RISC OS. And I *know* Macs have gone all
    anti-aliased, but I don't like it.

    Yes, I like RISC OS in principle - but... Umm... People criticise Macs
    because they're lacking software. Well, no they're not (unless you mean
    `games' by `software'); but RISC OS *is* short of software. I know it's
    very reliable, very efficient, very nice - but there's nothing like
    on RISC OS, is there[1]? It
    doesn't help that I'm hopelessly addicted to MacSoup (The One True
    Newsreader).

    Rowland.
    (with a couple of BBC Micros in the loft, and maybe an Acorn Atom
    somewhere)

    [1] Admittedly there's nothing like preview-TeX on my Mac - but just
    you wait until I've upgraded to MacOS X 10.3 and got X Windows sorted
    out.

    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

  3. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    In article ,
    limestone-cowboy wrote:
    > Whatever happened to RON?


    http://www.riscos.com/ron/ :

    "E&OE Copyright RISCOS Ltd. 2000 last Updated 22/02/2000"

    Lars J
    --
    "People generally seem to want software to be free as in speech and/or
    free as in beer. Unfortunately rather too much of it is free as in jazz."
    / Janet McKnight, on uk.misc

  4. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Good day,

    > Er, yes? But you could hardly call MS-DOS competition to SIBO (izzat
    > the Psion 3 OS?), and in any case: my point was that when the Psion 3
    > *was launched*, MS wasn't in the market. I didn't say MS didn't enter
    > the market after the Psion 3 was launched. I knew very well that MS
    > entered the market after the Psion 3 had been launched. I didn't know
    > about these awful MS-DOS machines, mind.


    The MS-DOS machines are still considered by many to be the finest
    handheld PCs in existence so your "awful" statement betrays your
    ignorance of the field. Indeed, these machines (made by HP) are still
    available for sale on the net essentially "new" (with many upgrades in
    terms of the CPU speed and RAM capacity).

    These machines ran a standard Intel 8086/8016 CPU and usually came with
    MS DOS and a GUI. As they ran DOS, they could also run ANY CGA
    compatible DOS program -- and even you have to concede that these far
    exceed EPOC programs. You have to remember in this era, many people
    were still using old gems like Wordperfect and Lotus 123. Both would
    run on this little device!

    In the modern day it would be as if a handheld ran the native versions
    of Microsoft Office!

    And if you are a Microsoft basher, you could run an alternate OS now as
    well ... e.g., Linux.

    In terms of battery life and the such... very similar to the Psion
    devices. Ran on AA batteries.

    Regards,
    Michael Tam

    --
    -------------------------------------
    Michael Tam
    e-mail: vitualis (at) michaeltam.com
    website: http://www.michaeltam.com

  5. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Michael Tam wrote:
    > The MS-DOS machines are still considered by many to be the finest
    > handheld PCs in existence so your "awful" statement betrays your
    > ignorance of the field.


    It gets worse because Texlogik's products were mostly DOS based. They
    inherited the industrial EPOC-16 products from PSION, but it now seems that
    they are going towards Windows-CE.


    Texlogik's products included full 3270 terminal emulation, wireless adaptors
    built-in, as well as the basic stuff such as bar code readers. The OS may have
    been inferior to EPOC-16, but they seemed to be better equipped for industrial applications.

  6. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet (Rowland McDonnell) wrote in
    news:1g7h5t0.280iaa314tgwN%real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet:

    > Yes, I like RISC OS in principle - but... Umm... People criticise Macs
    > because they're lacking software. Well, no they're not (unless you mean
    > `games' by `software'); but RISC OS *is* short of software.


    Also critically short of hardware too I believe. I remember when I was
    first looking for a Windows replacement some years ago there were a couple
    of platforms (Omega?). Has there been much movement on any of this since
    then?

    > doesn't help that I'm hopelessly addicted to MacSoup (The One True
    > Newsreader).


    I tried it but I couldn't get my head round the interface for MacSoup even
    after several attempts. Possibly because I don't come from a background in
    the classic mac interface. I use Pan running under X11 and will probably
    stick with that until either alx3000 or PineappleNews (my old BeOS
    newsreader) but neither of these will arrive ina hurry. People do seem to
    like MacSoup though.

    Cheers,

    Steve

    --
    Email: steve 'at' shodgson 'dot' org 'dot' uk

  7. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Steve Hodgson wrote:

    > real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet (Rowland McDonnell) wrote:
    >
    > > Yes, I like RISC OS in principle - but... Umm... People criticise Macs
    > > because they're lacking software. Well, no they're not (unless you mean
    > > `games' by `software'); but RISC OS *is* short of software.

    >
    > Also critically short of hardware too I believe. I remember when I was
    > first looking for a Windows replacement some years ago there were a couple
    > of platforms (Omega?). Has there been much movement on any of this since
    > then?


    Not that I'm aware of, which is a terrible shame. Acorn had some lovely
    ideas; RISC OS could have a future, and the ARM *does* have one -
    whyohwhycan'titbeusedforwhatitwasmeantforeh?

    > > doesn't help that I'm hopelessly addicted to MacSoup (The One True
    > > Newsreader).

    >
    > I tried it but I couldn't get my head round the interface for MacSoup even
    > after several attempts. Possibly because I don't come from a background in
    > the classic mac interface.


    Possibly, but it's more than that: I've been using Macs for years - both
    the `classic' interface and the new Aqua interface (the UI change hasn't
    made a huge difference, really), and I didn't like MacSoup to begin with
    at all - the user interface didn't make sense and didn't feel right.
    But because of the shortage of shareware offline Mac newsreaders at the
    time (like, no others available, man), I stuck with it - and after a
    week or two was converted to the `prise it from my cold dead fingers'
    way of thinking about MacSoup. It's really very, very well thought out,
    but this isn't apparent until you've got used to it. It won't suit
    everyone, mind - some people never do get to like the MacSoup way of
    doing things, but those who *do* like it, like it lots.

    >I use Pan running under X11 and will probably
    > stick with that until either alx3000 or PineappleNews (my old BeOS
    > newsreader) but neither of these will arrive ina hurry.


    Righto (I'll be playing with X11 myself one of these days; always nice
    to hear about `what works on a Mac' for others, y'know?)

    > People do seem to
    > like MacSoup though.


    It's the graphical thread display which does it for me.

    Rowland.

    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

  8. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Michael Tam wrote:

    > Good day,
    >
    > > Er, yes? But you could hardly call MS-DOS competition to SIBO (izzat
    > > the Psion 3 OS?), and in any case: my point was that when the Psion 3
    > > *was launched*, MS wasn't in the market. I didn't say MS didn't enter
    > > the market after the Psion 3 was launched. I knew very well that MS
    > > entered the market after the Psion 3 had been launched. I didn't know
    > > about these awful MS-DOS machines, mind.

    >
    > The MS-DOS machines are still considered by many to be the finest
    > handheld PCs in existence so your "awful" statement betrays your
    > ignorance of the field.


    Not at all. I just happen to disagree with them. Just because my
    opinion is not the same as theirs does not mean I'm ignorant. I'd say
    it means they and you are ignorant. It's an equally valid point of
    view, wouldn't you say?

    [snip]

    > These machines ran a standard Intel 8086/8016 CPU and usually came with
    > MS DOS and a GUI. As they ran DOS, they could also run ANY CGA
    > compatible DOS program -- and even you have to concede that these far
    > exceed EPOC programs.


    Not on a handheld computer for doing the job of a PDA. And how about
    comparing them to SIBO programs, of the sort on my Psion 3?

    > You have to remember in this era, many people
    > were still using old gems like Wordperfect and Lotus 123. Both would
    > run on this little device!


    So what? I'd rather the Psion 3 spreadsheet than Lotus 123 on a
    handheld PDA. Yes, I have used both of them to do real-world jobs.

    > In the modern day it would be as if a handheld ran the native versions
    > of Microsoft Office!


    Exactly - an expensive joke in bad taste.

    [snip]

    Rowland.

    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

  9. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    In article <1g7ich9.lp9mmt0imoN%real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet>,
    Rowland McDonnell wrote:
    > > Also critically short of hardware too I believe. I remember when I was
    > > first looking for a Windows replacement some years ago there were a
    > > couple of platforms (Omega?). Has there been much movement on any of
    > > this since then?


    > Not that I'm aware of, which is a terrible shame. Acorn had some lovely
    > ideas; RISC OS could have a future, and the ARM *does* have one -
    > whyohwhycan'titbeusedforwhatitwasmeantforeh?


    In which case you have missed Castle's Iyonix - introduced just over a year
    ago. There are also several emulators allowing the use of RISC OS on
    Windows machines.

    --
    __ __ __ __ __ ___ _____________________________________________
    |__||__)/ __/ \|\ ||_ | / Acorn StrongArm Risc_PC
    | || \\__/\__/| \||__ | /...Internet access for all Acorn RISC machines
    ___________________________/ dhwild@argonet.co.uk

  10. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Rowland McDonnell writes
    >Graham Thurlwell wrote:
    >
    >> On the 3 Jan 2004, real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet (Rowland
    >> McDonnell) wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > But I have a need for 'net access and typesetting and suchlike.
    >> > What choice do I have?

    >>
    >> How about a RISC OS machine?

    >
    >It's like this: compare the amount of TeX-related software available for
    >Unix to that with RISC OS. And I *know* Macs have gone all
    >anti-aliased, but I don't like it.


    Not used it myself (too poor to buy) but AIUI, Techwriter is far and
    away the most user-friendly TeX based typesetting/DTP package around. If
    you want quality not quantity, go RISC OS.

    Your nearest periodicals library should have copies of The Mathematical
    Gazette - take a look, it's all typeset using Techwriter on RISC OS, and
    looks thoroughly professional.

    Net access on RISC OS is less brilliant. There are several browsers
    around, all provide basic access, none do the full IE dynamic bit well,
    if at all. For example, some can be used for online banking with some
    banks.

    Oh, and there are a couple of Psion link utilities, too.

    Cheers,
    Guy


  11. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    David H Wild wrote in
    news:4c704e3680dhwild@argonet.co.uk:

    > In article <1g7ich9.lp9mmt0imoN%real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet>,
    > Rowland McDonnell wrote:
    >> > Also critically short of hardware too I believe. I remember when I
    >> > was first looking for a Windows replacement some years ago there
    >> > were a couple of platforms (Omega?). Has there been much movement
    >> > on any of this since then?

    >
    >> Not that I'm aware of, which is a terrible shame. Acorn had some
    >> lovely ideas; RISC OS could have a future, and the ARM *does* have
    >> one - whyohwhycan'titbeusedforwhatitwasmeantforeh?

    >
    > In which case you have missed Castle's Iyonix - introduced just over

    a
    > year ago. There are also several emulators allowing the use of RISC

    OS
    > on Windows machines.


    That was one of them. That was being talked about when I was first
    actively looking at RISC OS back at the end of 2000. That it took till
    nearly 2003 to appear is development over geological time in computer
    terms.

    Is there still a 'plit' between OS versions 5 & 4? I can't remember the
    background to that one.

    Having said all that, I'd still love to try out RON as the demos I saw
    of RISC OS were very impressive. I don't think there has been any
    change at http://www.riscos.com/ron/ since 2000 so I won't hold my
    breath.

    It will still be quicker than the next Symbian OS though ;o)

    Cheers,

    Steve

    --
    Email: steve 'at' shodgson 'dot' org 'dot' uk

  12. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Good day,

    >>>Er, yes? But you could hardly call MS-DOS competition to SIBO (izzat
    >>>the Psion 3 OS?), and in any case: my point was that when the Psion 3
    >>>*was launched*, MS wasn't in the market. I didn't say MS didn't enter
    >>>the market after the Psion 3 was launched. I knew very well that MS
    >>>entered the market after the Psion 3 had been launched. I didn't know
    >>>about these awful MS-DOS machines, mind.

    >>
    >>The MS-DOS machines are still considered by many to be the finest
    >>handheld PCs in existence so your "awful" statement betrays your
    >>ignorance of the field.

    >
    >
    > Not at all. I just happen to disagree with them. Just because my
    > opinion is not the same as theirs does not mean I'm ignorant. I'd say
    > it means they and you are ignorant. It's an equally valid point of
    > view, wouldn't you say?


    Um, let's see. Calling something "awful" when you didn't even know
    about its existence at all is what I would consider to be ignorant since
    you can't have any real knowledge or opinions about it.

    >>These machines ran a standard Intel 8086/8016 CPU and usually came with
    >>MS DOS and a GUI. As they ran DOS, they could also run ANY CGA
    >>compatible DOS program -- and even you have to concede that these far
    >>exceed EPOC programs.

    >
    >
    > Not on a handheld computer for doing the job of a PDA. And how about
    > comparing them to SIBO programs, of the sort on my Psion 3?


    If you knew anything about the devices, you would know that they came
    with an additional GUI and PDA type programs that ran by default on top
    of MS-DOS. What made these devices particularly flexible was the fact
    that they DID use MS-DOS.

    >> You have to remember in this era, many people
    >>were still using old gems like Wordperfect and Lotus 123. Both would
    >>run on this little device!

    >
    >
    > So what? I'd rather the Psion 3 spreadsheet than Lotus 123 on a
    > handheld PDA. Yes, I have used both of them to do real-world jobs.


    Yes, but the Psion 3 DIDN'T EXIST when this device was released. And
    regardless what your opinion is, many people would prefer an industry
    standard program that reads and writes natively to the industry standard
    file format to another third party program.

    >>In the modern day it would be as if a handheld ran the native versions
    >>of Microsoft Office!

    >
    >
    > Exactly - an expensive joke in bad taste.


    Or if you like, it would be like a modern handheld running native
    versions of SUSE LINUX running MOZILLA and OPEN OFFICE. The old DOS
    based handhelds ran on minaturised version of standard hardware -- which
    means you can also install alternate operating systems (e.g., Linux).

    Regardless of your mindless Psion worship, these devices are still
    pretty damn cool. Sure, the Psion units were excellent devices, but
    they are not be all and end all of handhelds.

    You've likened in another post that Psion units were more like portable
    computers than Windows CE devices. I completely disagree with that
    sentiment. Windows CE devices are just as good as a "portable PC" as
    Psion units -- with BETTER connectivity to a desktop PC. However, even
    accepting your argument, these DOS based Handheld devices are even MORE
    so like portable PCs -- in fact, they are exactly that. A miniturised
    8086/8016 computer running off AA batteries.

    Regards.

    --
    -------------------------------------
    Michael Tam
    e-mail: vitualis (at) michaeltam.com
    website: http://www.michaeltam.com

  13. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    David H Wild wrote:

    > In article <1g7ich9.lp9mmt0imoN%real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet>,
    > > > Also critically short of hardware too I believe. I remember when I was
    > > > first looking for a Windows replacement some years ago there were a
    > > > couple of platforms (Omega?). Has there been much movement on any of
    > > > this since then?

    >
    > > Not that I'm aware of, which is a terrible shame. Acorn had some lovely
    > > ideas; RISC OS could have a future, and the ARM *does* have one -
    > > whyohwhycan'titbeusedforwhatitwasmeantforeh?

    >
    > In which case you have missed Castle's Iyonix - introduced just over a year
    > ago. There are also several emulators allowing the use of RISC OS on
    > Windows machines.


    Hmm! All to the good. But it does seem that ARM CPUs haven't been
    developed as much as they might :-/ And the hardware in those computers
    is distinctly unimpressive - one nice thing about Acorn way back when is
    that they had very impressive hardware.

    Rowland.

    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

  14. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Michael Tam wrote:

    [snip]

    > Regardless of your mindless Psion worship,


    Oh dear.

    Rowland.

    [snip]

    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

  15. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Michael Tam wrote in message news:<40053731@dnews.tpgi.com.au>...


    > >>In the modern day it would be as if a handheld ran the native versions
    > >>of Microsoft Office!

    > >
    > > Exactly - an expensive joke in bad taste.

    >
    > Or if you like, it would be like a modern handheld running native
    > versions of SUSE LINUX running MOZILLA and OPEN OFFICE. The old DOS
    > based handhelds ran on minaturised version of standard hardware -- which
    > means you can also install alternate operating systems (e.g., Linux).
    >
    > Regardless of your mindless Psion worship, these devices are still
    > pretty damn cool. Sure, the Psion units were excellent devices, but
    > they are not be all and end all of handhelds.


    Perhaps not, but I think you are underestimating the importance PDA
    users place on purpose-built software. Even if we love Open Office or
    MS Office on our desktops, we still don't want them on our handhelds.

    Given technical constrains like size, durability (crash'n'bash, drop
    on floor), and power (battery life), what is good for a desktop is
    quite different from what a PDA needs.

    Plus, even if these technical requirements can be overcome, there is
    still the issue of usage. A PDA will be used to make appointments in
    real time, ie there can be no time lag at all when scrolling in the
    calendar or listing other appointments. You can't expect the other guy
    to wait ten seconds for each day he suggests. You need these days and
    times displayed instantly. On the other hand, you may not need all the
    group planning and other advanced features, you just want to jot down
    a time and place. Other info can be added and categorised later.

    The same with word processing. To actually have the device save you
    time, you will have to do some work in spare moments. You need to be
    able to turn off the computer and have it save your work instantly
    when the person you were waiting for arrives, or to catch the train or
    whatever.

    I don't think MS Office or Open Office are of much use given these
    constraints.

    The reason Psions were so popular is perhaps because they provided
    trouble-free computing which could cater to 80% of users 80% of the
    time.

    Even Microsoft has recognised this, producing a special version of
    Windows which is better at meeting these particular requirements than
    WinXP or Win95 is or was.

    Hope you better understand the cool reception of desktop software on a
    handheld...

    Erik Sandblom

  16. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Good day,

    > Perhaps not, but I think you are underestimating the importance PDA
    > users place on purpose-built software. Even if we love Open Office or
    > MS Office on our desktops, we still don't want them on our handhelds.
    >
    > Given technical constrains like size, durability (crash'n'bash, drop
    > on floor), and power (battery life), what is good for a desktop is
    > quite different from what a PDA needs.


    ARGHH... Please read the entire post. You are missing the point entirely.

    The HP DOS powered handheld PCs were essentially a STANDARD IBM XT PC
    minuturised to fit in the palm of your hand and run off two AA batteries.

    Considering the time it was released, it would be EQUIVALENT NOW to a
    full Pentium II or early Pentium III desktop PC with the standard specs
    (and thus, running at the SAME speed) strunk down to the size of a Psion
    device. It would be an amazing feat of engineering.

    The whole arguement of desktop vs PDA oriented software is beside the
    point. I'm not advocating putting MS Office onto a PDA -- that was an
    ANALOGY of what the HP DOS handhelds WOULD BE if it was released in the
    modern day.

    The standard DOS software running on the HP handhelds (despite being
    desktop versions) were still fine on the PDA -- remember, they were
    designed to be operated completely by keyboard. Many people still
    consider themselves much more productive with some of these older
    programs (e.g., Wordperfect, Word 5, Lotus 123, etc.) as once they
    learnt all the shortcuts, you could keep both hands on the keyboard and
    not need to use some pointing device.

    These are the reasons why these "DOS" based handhelds (remember,
    standard XT hardware means you can install another OS if you really
    wanted to) remain so popular and still command a higher price than many
    of the much more contemporary Windows CE based devices. They aren't a
    portable device with a shrunk down customised OS running on essentially
    proprietary hardware. They were a fully featured PC miniturised to a
    handheld size --> though of course, PCs of that era were simpler and
    hard much less demanding specifications.

    Regards,
    Michael Tam

    --
    -------------------------------------
    Michael Tam
    e-mail: vitualis (at) michaeltam.com
    website: http://www.michaeltam.com

  17. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    Michael Tam wrote:

    [snip]

    > The HP DOS powered handheld PCs were essentially a STANDARD IBM XT PC
    > minuturised to fit in the palm of your hand and run off two AA batteries.
    >
    > Considering the time it was released, it would be EQUIVALENT NOW to a
    > full Pentium II or early Pentium III desktop PC with the standard specs
    > (and thus, running at the SAME speed) strunk down to the size of a Psion
    > device. It would be an amazing feat of engineering.


    Not really, because the IBM PC XT was a hopeless pile of ****e by the
    standards of the day. I recall reading the original IBM PC benchmarks:
    it compared unfavourably with the BBC Micro in all respects except for
    RAM, brand name, and fanciness of the case and keyboard and suchlike.

    You seem to forget how poor the early IBM PCs were in the technical
    sense.

    [snip]

    Rowland.

    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

  18. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 23:36:34 +1100, Michael Tam
    wrote:

    >The HP DOS powered handheld PCs were essentially a STANDARD IBM XT PC
    >minuturised to fit in the palm of your hand and run off two AA batteries.


    The HP200LX was a neat little machine (preceeded by the 95LX and
    100LX), although given they came out around 1991, I'm not sure
    what the cutdown factor was relative to the desktop systems of
    the day. The Psion 3 was using the same CPU and clock speed.

    >The standard DOS software running on the HP handhelds (despite being
    >desktop versions) were still fine on the PDA -- remember, they were
    >designed to be operated completely by keyboard.


    I never got into the HP models. The tiny keyboard defeated me,
    and eventually drove me very reluctantly to the Psion. The Psion
    had a far superior keyboard, mostly by dropping the numeric
    keypad and having fewer keys in the same area. Of course, if you
    were a heavy spreadsheet user, then you absolutely wanted that
    numeric keyboard, and claimed the HP had the better keyboard. On
    several trips to the USA I went into Frys fully intending to buy
    an HP, tried the keyboard yet again, and left without it.

    However I did use several larger devices (overall or coat pocket
    devices, rather than shirt pocket sized) that were essentially
    the same MS-DOS in ROM based idea as the HP. I even have a web
    page listing pretty much all of them I ever discovered at
    http://www.ericlindsay.com/palmtop/palmlist.htm With the right
    software added to the built in applications, you could get a lot
    of work done with them, thanks to the MS-DOS heritage. I used JP
    Software's 4Dos to boost the ability of the command processor,
    and QEdit to get much faster text entry. They pretty much all
    came with Lotus 123. I even managed to get a parallel port SCSI
    adaptor working on a Sharp PC3100, and ran a hard drive on it.
    Never could get a CD-ROM to work however.

    I just unearthed from that time an Abstract R&D Lexicomp. I'd put
    it aside a fair few years ago because the surface finish had
    started to run, leaving you covered with black goop when you
    handled it. So much of the finish has now disolved that I was
    able to remove most of the rest of it down to bare plastic with
    methylated spirits. When I get some more goop off it, I'll find
    some AA rechargeables, and see if the 1.3" 20MB hard drive will
    still spin up.

    --
    Eric Lindsay http://www.ericlindsay.com/airlie
    Airlie Beach Qld Australia - Great Barrier Reef entry
    Psion & Epoc site http://www.ericlindsay.com/epoc
    Bait for spammers: root@localhost postmaster@localhost
    admin@localhost abuse@localhost postmaster@127.0.0.1

  19. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet (Rowland McDonnell) writes:

    > Yes, I like RISC OS in principle - but... Umm... People criticise
    > Macs because they're lacking software. Well, no they're not (unless
    > you mean `games' by `software'); but RISC OS *is* short of software.
    > I know it's very reliable, very efficient, very nice - but there's
    > nothing like on RISC OS, is
    > there[1]? It doesn't help that I'm hopelessly addicted to MacSoup
    > (The One True Newsreader).
    >
    > [1] Admittedly there's nothing like preview-TeX on my Mac - but just
    > you wait until I've upgraded to MacOS X 10.3 and got X Windows
    > sorted out.


    Bzzzzt.

    There is a reason that some people refer to this package just as
    you-know-what. Keyword sniffers are everywhere.

    FWIW, image support for Carbon has just been checked into the Emacs
    CVS repository. So you can at your choice either get X sorted out,
    or install a recent developer version of Emacs.

  20. Re: OMG, netBook discontinued

    David Kastrup wrote:

    > real-address-in-sig@flur.bltigibbet (Rowland McDonnell) writes:
    >
    > > Yes, I like RISC OS in principle - but... Umm... People criticise
    > > Macs because they're lacking software. Well, no they're not (unless
    > > you mean `games' by `software'); but RISC OS *is* short of software.
    > > I know it's very reliable, very efficient, very nice - but there's
    > > nothing like on RISC OS, is
    > > there[1]? It doesn't help that I'm hopelessly addicted to MacSoup
    > > (The One True Newsreader).
    > >
    > > [1] Admittedly there's nothing like preview-TeX on my Mac - but just
    > > you wait until I've upgraded to MacOS X 10.3 and got X Windows
    > > sorted out.

    >
    > Bzzzzt.
    >
    > There is a reason that some people refer to this package just as
    > you-know-what. Keyword sniffers are everywhere.


    I can run, but not, it seems, hide.

    > FWIW, image support for Carbon has just been checked into the Emacs
    > CVS repository. So you can at your choice either get X sorted out,
    > or install a recent developer version of Emacs.


    Righto - thanks for that.

    I think I'll still wait for XEmacs; I've been unimpressed with the Aqua
    Emacs ports I've tried out so far for various reasons. But then again,
    maybe I won't. Hmm...

    Rowland.


    --
    Remove the animal for email address: rowland.mcdonnell@dog.physics.org
    PGP pub key 0x62DCCA78 Sorry - the spam got to me
    http://www.mag-uk.org
    UK biker? Join MAG and help keep bureaucracy at bay

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast