Forcing preferred route with dual port router - Routers

This is a discussion on Forcing preferred route with dual port router - Routers ; I have a Netgear FVS-124G dual port router. This means it hooks up to two seperate internet taps. I have one tap hooked into my cable modem and the second one hooked up to a DSL line. My cable company ...

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Thread: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

  1. Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    I have a Netgear FVS-124G dual port router. This means it hooks up to two
    seperate internet taps.
    I have one tap hooked into my cable modem and the second one hooked up to a
    DSL line.
    My cable company blocks any outgoing email that isn't routed through their
    email server. I do most of my emailling on my laptop which I take between
    work and home. So, I leave all my email servering to go through out work
    server. When I'm at home, when I send email, if it gets routed through the
    cable modem, it gets bounced back at me. If it gets routed through my DSL
    line, it goes through just fine.
    Similarly, all my newsgroup stuff is set up to go through my cable companies
    news server. But when by newsreader attempts to connect with it, if it goes
    through my DSL line, the cable company's news server rejects it since they
    don't recognize me as a paying customer.
    My question is, how can I set my router up so that any packets going to a
    particular IP (or domain name) gets routed through a particular network tap?



  2. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    It sounds like you need an SMTP outgoing service that requires
    authentication with a user name and password. If you ISP's don't provide it
    you get get a free Gmail account, turn on POP3, and use Gmail for your
    outgoing mail Server no matter where you are.

    Bruce

    "John Smith" wrote in message
    news:7QFBi.44201$xZ2.33851@newsfe10.phx...
    >I have a Netgear FVS-124G dual port router. This means it hooks up to two
    >seperate internet taps.
    > I have one tap hooked into my cable modem and the second one hooked up to
    > a DSL line.
    > My cable company blocks any outgoing email that isn't routed through their
    > email server. I do most of my emailling on my laptop which I take between
    > work and home. So, I leave all my email servering to go through out work
    > server. When I'm at home, when I send email, if it gets routed through the
    > cable modem, it gets bounced back at me. If it gets routed through my DSL
    > line, it goes through just fine.
    > Similarly, all my newsgroup stuff is set up to go through my cable
    > companies news server. But when by newsreader attempts to connect with it,
    > if it goes through my DSL line, the cable company's news server rejects it
    > since they don't recognize me as a paying customer.
    > My question is, how can I set my router up so that any packets going to a
    > particular IP (or domain name) gets routed through a particular network
    > tap?
    >




  3. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    Our mail server at work does require all that login stuff. The problem is
    the cable
    company (one of my internet providers) blocks all outgoing SMTP packets that
    don't go to their email server (ie it blocks outgoing smtp packets to my
    work
    email server). My DSL provider doesn't block the packets.
    What I'm looking for is a way to route all traffic going to my work's IP
    number to
    go through DSL and not through cable.

    "Bruce" wrote in message
    news:Fd0Ci.174$3R5.57@trnddc05...
    > It sounds like you need an SMTP outgoing service that requires
    > authentication with a user name and password. If you ISP's don't provide
    > it you get get a free Gmail account, turn on POP3, and use Gmail for your
    > outgoing mail Server no matter where you are.
    >
    > Bruce
    >
    > "John Smith" wrote in message
    > news:7QFBi.44201$xZ2.33851@newsfe10.phx...
    >>I have a Netgear FVS-124G dual port router. This means it hooks up to two
    >>seperate internet taps.
    >> I have one tap hooked into my cable modem and the second one hooked up to
    >> a DSL line.
    >> My cable company blocks any outgoing email that isn't routed through
    >> their email server. I do most of my emailling on my laptop which I take
    >> between work and home. So, I leave all my email servering to go through
    >> out work server. When I'm at home, when I send email, if it gets routed
    >> through the cable modem, it gets bounced back at me. If it gets routed
    >> through my DSL line, it goes through just fine.
    >> Similarly, all my newsgroup stuff is set up to go through my cable
    >> companies news server. But when by newsreader attempts to connect with
    >> it, if it goes through my DSL line, the cable company's news server
    >> rejects it since they don't recognize me as a paying customer.
    >> My question is, how can I set my router up so that any packets going to a
    >> particular IP (or domain name) gets routed through a particular network
    >> tap?
    >>

    >
    >




  4. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    Unit: FVS124G ProSafe™ VPN Firewall 25 with 4 Gigabit LAN and Dual WAN
    Ports

    You appear to want to traffic route depending on packet type and port?
    The question is does your unit support this?

    Which feature of your unit do you think allows you to accomplish this?


  5. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    "John Smith" wrote in message
    news:1vsCi.132781$kK1.17384@newsfe14.phx...
    > Our mail server at work does require all that login stuff. The problem is
    > the cable
    > company (one of my internet providers) blocks all outgoing SMTP packets
    > that
    > don't go to their email server (ie it blocks outgoing smtp packets to my
    > work
    > email server). My DSL provider doesn't block the packets.
    > What I'm looking for is a way to route all traffic going to my work's IP
    > number to
    > go through DSL and not through cable.
    >


    I think perhaps what your ISP is doing is blocking port 25 not just all smtp
    traffic. You can get around this by using an alternate submission port in
    your mail client. Most ISPs block port 25 to help cut back on spam. If
    your mail provider offers an alternate port then use that one instead of 25.

    Not sure about the router though. I've got a dual WAN router as well but
    only use one side. In about a week though I might be of help! ;-)



  6. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    On Sep 3, 11:57 am, "Jbob" wrote:
    > "John Smith" wrote in message
    >
    > news:1vsCi.132781$kK1.17384@newsfe14.phx...
    >
    > > Our mail server at work does require all that login stuff. The problem is
    > > the cable
    > > company (one of my internet providers) blocks all outgoing SMTP packets
    > > that
    > > don't go to their email server (ie it blocks outgoing smtp packets to my
    > > work
    > > email server). My DSL provider doesn't block the packets.
    > > What I'm looking for is a way to route all traffic going to my work's IP
    > > number to
    > > go through DSL and not through cable.

    >
    > I think perhaps what your ISP is doing is blocking port 25 not just all smtp
    > traffic. You can get around this by using an alternate submission port in
    > your mail client. Most ISPs block port 25 to help cut back on spam. If
    > your mail provider offers an alternate port then use that one instead of 25.
    >
    > Not sure about the router though. I've got a dual WAN router as well but
    > only use one side. In about a week though I might be of help! ;-)


    .....eh, based on the manual your router doesn't do this:
    " What I'm looking for is a way to route all (ALL) traffic going to my
    work's IP
    number to go through DSL and not through cable. "
    Unless of course you tell me which of the features listed in the
    manual does it.



  7. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router

    It does have something called 'static routes' but when I attempt to enter
    data
    for it, it seems to want a lot more than I would think it needs for just
    forcing
    traffic to a particular IP to be forced through one wan or the other.

    Unfortunately, if I knew which of the features listed in the manual does it,
    I
    probably would have figured it out already.

    "LC" wrote in message
    news:1188972937.294629.156520@19g2000hsx.googlegro ups.com...
    > On Sep 3, 11:57 am, "Jbob" wrote:
    >> "John Smith" wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:1vsCi.132781$kK1.17384@newsfe14.phx...
    >>
    >> > Our mail server at work does require all that login stuff. The problem
    >> > is
    >> > the cable
    >> > company (one of my internet providers) blocks all outgoing SMTP packets
    >> > that
    >> > don't go to their email server (ie it blocks outgoing smtp packets to
    >> > my
    >> > work
    >> > email server). My DSL provider doesn't block the packets.
    >> > What I'm looking for is a way to route all traffic going to my work's
    >> > IP
    >> > number to
    >> > go through DSL and not through cable.

    >>
    >> I think perhaps what your ISP is doing is blocking port 25 not just all
    >> smtp
    >> traffic. You can get around this by using an alternate submission port
    >> in
    >> your mail client. Most ISPs block port 25 to help cut back on spam. If
    >> your mail provider offers an alternate port then use that one instead of
    >> 25.
    >>
    >> Not sure about the router though. I've got a dual WAN router as well but
    >> only use one side. In about a week though I might be of help! ;-)

    >
    > ....eh, based on the manual your router doesn't do this:
    > " What I'm looking for is a way to route all (ALL) traffic going to my
    > work's IP
    > number to go through DSL and not through cable. "
    > Unless of course you tell me which of the features listed in the
    > manual does it.
    >
    >




  8. Re: Forcing preferred route with dual port router


    A static route, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Static_routing ) will
    route a specified subnet to an interface.

    However from what you said above, it appears you

    need to filter traffic of mail and newservers to an interface.

    >From the specs of your unit ( http://kbserver.netgear.com/products/FVS124G.asp

    ), this is not supported. Usually these functions are supported on
    higher level enterprise routers. That's all, justed wanted to know if
    you knew something more about the router than I did.



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