Wireless Frequency - Routers

This is a discussion on Wireless Frequency - Routers ; I have a broadband wireless connection in a rural area. Uses 2.4 GHz. I suspect the problem I'm having with my wireless router is that it also transmits at 2.4 GHz. Anyone aware of a wireless router that transmits at ...

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Thread: Wireless Frequency

  1. Wireless Frequency

    I have a broadband wireless connection in a rural area. Uses 2.4 GHz.
    I suspect the problem I'm having with my wireless router is that it
    also transmits at 2.4 GHz. Anyone aware of a wireless router that
    transmits at an alternate frequency?
    --

    Monroe

  2. Re: Wireless Frequency

    Monroe wrote:
    > I have a broadband wireless connection in a rural area. Uses 2.4 GHz.
    > I suspect the problem I'm having with my wireless router is that it
    > also transmits at 2.4 GHz. Anyone aware of a wireless router that
    > transmits at an alternate frequency?
    > --
    >
    > Monroe


    Monroe:

    Try changing the "Channel" you use for WiFi.

    http://compnetworking.about.com/od/w...ifichannel.htm

    http://www.moonblinkwifi.com/2point4freq.cfm

    HTH & GL

    John

    --
    \\\||///
    ------------------o000----(o)(o)----000o----------------
    ----------------------------()--------------------------
    '' Madness takes its toll - Please have exact change. ''

    John Dulak - Gnomeway Services - http://tinyurl.com/2qs6o6

  3. Re: Wireless Frequency

    John Dulak wrote:
    > Monroe wrote:
    >> I have a broadband wireless connection in a rural area. Uses 2.4 GHz.
    >> I suspect the problem I'm having with my wireless router is that it
    >> also transmits at 2.4 GHz. Anyone aware of a wireless router that
    >> transmits at an alternate frequency?
    >> --
    >>
    >> Monroe

    >
    > Monroe:
    >
    > Try changing the "Channel" you use for WiFi.
    >
    > http://compnetworking.about.com/od/w...ifichannel.htm
    >
    > http://www.moonblinkwifi.com/2point4freq.cfm
    >
    > HTH & GL
    >
    > John
    >



    Check to see if anyone is using wireless telephone / base stations.
    They might be imposing on your 802.11b/g frequencies.

    If you really need a different frequency band, you can use 802.11a
    equipment that uses the 5ghz range. That will likely require a change
    of wireless router and probably a different wireless NIC. 802.11a has
    about 20% - 30% less range than 802.11b/g.

    Go to the cisco.com for more info.



  4. Re: Wireless Frequency

    Appreciated the answers to date, but I should have been more specific
    in my problem. The LAN wireless side of things works well; notebook
    picks up signal well enough for all uses (surprising distance!). But
    switching from a Dlink DI-804HV (wired), that worked well with my
    broadband inet connection, and using default settings for each router,
    the newer DI-625 does not allow connection with the broadband ISP
    network. Not at the immediate workstation nor through the mobile
    laptop. Dlink status indicates that connection is good (i.e. no
    faulty hardware connections) but continual "establishing connnection"
    with no connection ever achieved. If I switch the routers out
    mid-stream of this problem, the wired router connects propertly within
    seconds.

    So tapped out at this end trying every conceivable variation in
    settings and even substituting various cables. Any suggestions
    appreciated. I'm wondering if buried in the settings of this
    wireless, there is one very signficant difference in default settings
    from that of the older wired router? I'm sticking to the idea that
    there is nothing wrong with this router, only in something not being
    set up properly. FYI, my ISP requires that the MAC address of the
    computer be cloned to each and every router used (as oppposed to them
    having logs of each and every MAC address/hardware item used). That
    was done first and foremost, but the problem persists.

    On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 23:03:19 -0600, Monroe
    wrote:

    >I have a broadband wireless connection in a rural area. Uses 2.4 GHz.
    >I suspect the problem I'm having with my wireless router is that it
    >also transmits at 2.4 GHz. Anyone aware of a wireless router that
    >transmits at an alternate frequency?


    --

    Monroe

  5. Re: Wireless Frequency


    Your question --

    Using the default settings for the Dlink DI-625 router, it does not
    allow connection with the
    broadband ISP network.

    IOW, You cannot connect to the internet? Not at the immediate
    workstation nor through the mobile laptop.

    I could not find in a search on the DLINK website the product DI-625;
    a google search gives a DI-624, Wireless (802.11g) High-Speed 108Mbps
    Broadband Router, is this the unit you have? If you have a 625 what
    country are you in? it may listed elsewhere?

    Typically connecting to the ISP troubleshooting varies, but your best
    bet is to look at the logs and see where in the connection its
    failing. Do you have a cable modem ? Is it just a modem, can it be the
    type with router? What service are you with?

    LC


  6. Re: Wireless Frequency

    Sorry, not DI-625 . . . . DIR-625.

    No modem, a wireless 2.4GHz radio-based system . . . . basically a
    2-way radio. Tranzeo brand system.

    Fiddling today as well, no solution in sight. Tried to get through to
    Dlink but long delays. Will continue on with that as I'd like to ID
    just what would be the critical differences when using default
    settings within each modem.

    On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 03:26:50 -0700, LC wrote:

    >
    >Your question --
    >
    >Using the default settings for the Dlink DI-625 router, it does not
    >allow connection with the
    >broadband ISP network.
    >
    >IOW, You cannot connect to the internet? Not at the immediate
    >workstation nor through the mobile laptop.
    >
    >I could not find in a search on the DLINK website the product DI-625;
    >a google search gives a DI-624, Wireless (802.11g) High-Speed 108Mbps
    >Broadband Router, is this the unit you have? If you have a 625 what
    >country are you in? it may listed elsewhere?
    >
    >Typically connecting to the ISP troubleshooting varies, but your best
    >bet is to look at the logs and see where in the connection its
    >failing. Do you have a cable modem ? Is it just a modem, can it be the
    >type with router? What service are you with?
    >
    >LC


    --

    Monroe

  7. Re: Wireless Frequency

    An interesting followup to my own thread . . . .

    D-Link tech assistance could not get the wireless router to function
    using the "dynamic IP" that was specified by my IPS (even with
    wireless features inactive) and was actually working well with the
    wired router. What he did recommend (and subsequently set up) was
    setting it up as a "static IP" despite that the ISP system assigns
    dynamic IP's, and leave the dealing with the dynamic associations to
    the computer as opposed to the router.

    Still don't understand this fully. Not really sure what has been
    done, but all works well. Now for some post-mortem study to see just
    how the hell this is working. And to see what is now measurably
    slowing down my system. But there is a reasonable degree of
    connection with the ISP and wireless features work flawlessly.

    On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 11:34:54 -0600, Monroe
    wrote:

    >Sorry, not DI-625 . . . . DIR-625.
    >
    >No modem, a wireless 2.4GHz radio-based system . . . . basically a
    >2-way radio. Tranzeo brand system.
    >
    >Fiddling today as well, no solution in sight. Tried to get through to
    >Dlink but long delays. Will continue on with that as I'd like to ID
    >just what would be the critical differences when using default
    >settings within each modem.
    >
    >On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 03:26:50 -0700, LC wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Your question --
    >>
    >>Using the default settings for the Dlink DI-625 router, it does not
    >>allow connection with the
    >>broadband ISP network.
    >>
    >>IOW, You cannot connect to the internet? Not at the immediate
    >>workstation nor through the mobile laptop.
    >>
    >>I could not find in a search on the DLINK website the product DI-625;
    >>a google search gives a DI-624, Wireless (802.11g) High-Speed 108Mbps
    >>Broadband Router, is this the unit you have? If you have a 625 what
    >>country are you in? it may listed elsewhere?
    >>
    >>Typically connecting to the ISP troubleshooting varies, but your best
    >>bet is to look at the logs and see where in the connection its
    >>failing. Do you have a cable modem ? Is it just a modem, can it be the
    >>type with router? What service are you with?
    >>
    >>LC


    --

    Monroe

  8. Re: Wireless Frequency


    Downloaded manual at,
    http://www.dlink.com/products/suppor...1&pv=107&sec=0
    Rev.A.

    I'm not clear on what you mean but I'll tell you what I know. I
    understood your router's issue to be that it could not connect to the
    ISP and you could not get internet neither with wireless or wired
    (logically). But it appears you may be speaking of DNS. IOW, if you
    cannot connect to ISP, then there is no service period, no matter if
    you have wireless association issues to your pc or wired pc.

    If you do have a connection to ISP, that is you can ping it with a
    wired pc yet you cannot get internet, then it may be related to DNS.
    If you attempt wirelessly and you cannot open a web page, yet your
    connected to your router fully, and can ping the internet, then again
    DNS.

    It may have been that your internet connection from the router may not
    been receiving and passing along properly all IP information. (This
    happens rarely, but when you have a double router situation - modem/
    router- andyou actually get an internal ip address sent to your
    second router.) So all this IP information that would normally would
    be sent through a setting of 'dynamic Ip' never reaches your pc. So he
    may have just set all these values fixed/static on your pc.

    That's all. So he applied directly the info to your pc, instead of
    getting this done by the dynamic ip setting which is the DHCP, which
    would have done it automatically and dynamically. I say dynamically
    since if these values change from your ISP, that is DNS ip values then
    you may still have a connection to the internet however no web pages.
    This rarely happens though.


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