How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network? - Routers

This is a discussion on How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network? - Routers ; I am a networking novice and need a little advice. I currently have three computers connected to an SMC7004VBR Broadband Router. All three connect to the Internet via the Router and also share a lot of large files. I was ...

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Thread: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

  1. How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    I am a networking novice and need a little advice. I currently have three
    computers connected to an SMC7004VBR Broadband Router. All three connect to
    the Internet via the Router and also share a lot of large files. I was
    happy until I read an article in PC Magazine that reminded me I have Gigabit
    controllers on all the Motherboards and yet they are running at 100. Is
    there a Broadband Router/Switch that supports Gigabit file transfers between
    computers? Or is the better/cheaper to just go buy an SMC8505T Gigabit
    Switch and connect it to the SMC7004VBR? If I buy the Switch do I connect
    it to one of the ports on the Broadband Router and connect the PC's to the
    Switch - Is there anything I have to tell WinXP on the PC's or does the
    Switch handle the traffic between the PC's and know when to go to the
    Broadband Router for an Internet request or response? Lots of dumb
    questions but I learning. Thanks in advance.



  2. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink" port
    (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to switch a
    certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your current router.

    And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    Cat5e.



    "Ken" wrote in message
    news:K8udnXTsmIUhNobYnZ2dnUVZ_qudnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    >I am a networking novice and need a little advice. I currently have three
    >computers connected to an SMC7004VBR Broadband Router. All three connect
    >to the Internet via the Router and also share a lot of large files. I was
    >happy until I read an article in PC Magazine that reminded me I have
    >Gigabit controllers on all the Motherboards and yet they are running at
    >100. Is there a Broadband Router/Switch that supports Gigabit file
    >transfers between computers? Or is the better/cheaper to just go buy an
    >SMC8505T Gigabit Switch and connect it to the SMC7004VBR? If I buy the
    >Switch do I connect it to one of the ports on the Broadband Router and
    >connect the PC's to the Switch - Is there anything I have to tell WinXP on
    >the PC's or does the Switch handle the traffic between the PC's and know
    >when to go to the Broadband Router for an Internet request or response?
    >Lots of dumb questions but I learning. Thanks in advance.
    >




  3. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    Sounds good - just needed a little encouragement! Thanks for the input.

    "nicklax" wrote in message
    news:97Odnc9nX6ien4HYnZ2dnUVZ_o-dnZ2d@comcast.com...
    > I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    > networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    > switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    > you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    > the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink"
    > port (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to
    > switch a certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your
    > current router.
    >
    > And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    > differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    > network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    > any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    > manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    > cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    > Cat5e.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Ken" wrote in message
    > news:K8udnXTsmIUhNobYnZ2dnUVZ_qudnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    >>I am a networking novice and need a little advice. I currently have three
    >>computers connected to an SMC7004VBR Broadband Router. All three connect
    >>to the Internet via the Router and also share a lot of large files. I was
    >>happy until I read an article in PC Magazine that reminded me I have
    >>Gigabit controllers on all the Motherboards and yet they are running at
    >>100. Is there a Broadband Router/Switch that supports Gigabit file
    >>transfers between computers? Or is the better/cheaper to just go buy an
    >>SMC8505T Gigabit Switch and connect it to the SMC7004VBR? If I buy the
    >>Switch do I connect it to one of the ports on the Broadband Router and
    >>connect the PC's to the Switch - Is there anything I have to tell WinXP on
    >>the PC's or does the Switch handle the traffic between the PC's and know
    >>when to go to the Broadband Router for an Internet request or response?
    >>Lots of dumb questions but I learning. Thanks in advance.
    >>

    >
    >




  4. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 15:15:49 -0500, "Ken"
    wrote:

    >Sounds good - just needed a little encouragement! Thanks for the input.
    >

    If you are home you will not get 1 gigabit thorughput. Cable and DSL
    just do not provide that kind of speed yet. You should be able to get
    faster than the average person though.

    >"nicklax" wrote in message
    >news:97Odnc9nX6ien4HYnZ2dnUVZ_o-dnZ2d@comcast.com...
    >> I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >> networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >> switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    >> you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    >> the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink"
    >> port (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to
    >> switch a certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your
    >> current router.
    >>
    >> And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    >> differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    >> network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    >> any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    >> manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    >> cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    >> Cat5e.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Ken" wrote in message
    >> news:K8udnXTsmIUhNobYnZ2dnUVZ_qudnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    >>>I am a networking novice and need a little advice. I currently have three
    >>>computers connected to an SMC7004VBR Broadband Router. All three connect
    >>>to the Internet via the Router and also share a lot of large files. I was
    >>>happy until I read an article in PC Magazine that reminded me I have
    >>>Gigabit controllers on all the Motherboards and yet they are running at
    >>>100. Is there a Broadband Router/Switch that supports Gigabit file
    >>>transfers between computers? Or is the better/cheaper to just go buy an
    >>>SMC8505T Gigabit Switch and connect it to the SMC7004VBR? If I buy the
    >>>Switch do I connect it to one of the ports on the Broadband Router and
    >>>connect the PC's to the Switch - Is there anything I have to tell WinXP on
    >>>the PC's or does the Switch handle the traffic between the PC's and know
    >>>when to go to the Broadband Router for an Internet request or response?
    >>>Lots of dumb questions but I learning. Thanks in advance.
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >



  5. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    It is not the Internet connection I am trying to speed up - it is the file
    transfers between in-house computer.

    "f/fgeorge" wrote in message
    news:s8coh29085mhgrue4ijtir418cf33hbsj7@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 15:15:49 -0500, "Ken"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Sounds good - just needed a little encouragement! Thanks for the input.
    >>

    > If you are home you will not get 1 gigabit thorughput. Cable and DSL
    > just do not provide that kind of speed yet. You should be able to get
    > faster than the average person though.
    >
    >>"nicklax" wrote in message
    >>news:97Odnc9nX6ien4HYnZ2dnUVZ_o-dnZ2d@comcast.com...
    >>> I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >>> networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >>> switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes,
    >>> all
    >>> you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked
    >>> into
    >>> the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink"
    >>> port (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to
    >>> switch a certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your
    >>> current router.
    >>>
    >>> And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    >>> differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    >>> network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't
    >>> have
    >>> any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    >>> manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    >>> cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    >>> Cat5e.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Ken" wrote in message
    >>> news:K8udnXTsmIUhNobYnZ2dnUVZ_qudnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    >>>>I am a networking novice and need a little advice. I currently have
    >>>>three
    >>>>computers connected to an SMC7004VBR Broadband Router. All three
    >>>>connect
    >>>>to the Internet via the Router and also share a lot of large files. I
    >>>>was
    >>>>happy until I read an article in PC Magazine that reminded me I have
    >>>>Gigabit controllers on all the Motherboards and yet they are running at
    >>>>100. Is there a Broadband Router/Switch that supports Gigabit file
    >>>>transfers between computers? Or is the better/cheaper to just go buy an
    >>>>SMC8505T Gigabit Switch and connect it to the SMC7004VBR? If I buy the
    >>>>Switch do I connect it to one of the ports on the Broadband Router and
    >>>>connect the PC's to the Switch - Is there anything I have to tell WinXP
    >>>>on
    >>>>the PC's or does the Switch handle the traffic between the PC's and know
    >>>>when to go to the Broadband Router for an Internet request or response?
    >>>>Lots of dumb questions but I learning. Thanks in advance.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >




  6. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    nicklax wrote:

    > I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    > networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    > switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it.


    I have been informing myself about this topic lately and my research
    tends to support your conclusion (i.e., get a separate switch).

    There is a D-Link cable/dsl router -- actually there are two models,
    wired and wireless -- with gigabit ethernet through the four LAN ports.
    They are aiming it particularly at online gamers.

    http://games.dlink.com/products/?pid=371

    cheers,

    Henry

  7. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    Yea, not being in the market for one yet I just haven't looked, though I'm
    sure the major companies are starting to put out some gigabit models,
    though as always, I'm sure they'll be charging a premium for the feature....


    "Henry" wrote in message
    news:1hmey5u.vm47nhuvq8tdN%henry999@eircom.net...
    > nicklax wrote:
    >
    >> I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >> networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >> switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it.

    >
    > I have been informing myself about this topic lately and my research
    > tends to support your conclusion (i.e., get a separate switch).
    >
    > There is a D-Link cable/dsl router -- actually there are two models,
    > wired and wireless -- with gigabit ethernet through the four LAN ports.
    > They are aiming it particularly at online gamers.
    >
    > http://games.dlink.com/products/?pid=371
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > Henry




  8. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    nicklax wrote:

    > Yea, ... I'm
    > sure the major companies are starting to put out some gigabit models,


    Don't be _too_ sure.

    What is the Netgear model? What is the Linksys / Cisco? Buffalo? Belkin?

    In fact, at the consumer level this equipment is still very very rare --
    which is why I thought it worthwhile to mention the D-Link.

    cheers,

    Henry

  9. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:10:22 -0400, "nicklax"
    wrote:

    >I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    >you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    >the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink" port
    >(some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to switch a
    >certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your current router.
    >
    >And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    >differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    >network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    >any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    >manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    >cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    >Cat5e.


    I recently bought a 3com gigabit switch, a couple of cat6 cables and a
    pair of Intel PRO/1000 pci-e NICs hoping to dramatically improve file
    transfer speeds over the old 100 Mb interface. I transfer a lot of
    movie and TV files (.AVI) and Virtualbox disk images (10+ GBytes)
    among the three computers that are on this network; I used the built
    in NIC on the third computer as it only had PCI slots. I use a program
    called DUMeter to detect real speeds.
    I've been somewhat disapointed at the speeds I've witnessed. First of
    all, they bounce all over the place. And the top speed I've seen is
    about 235 Mb/s (thats bits) with the average being 140-195 Mb/s. I was
    hoping to see at least 600-700 Mb/s. I just read a consumer oriented
    switch roundup on Tom's Hardware and all the switches are getting
    600-700 Mbps. My 100Mb/s switch commonly got around 93 Mb/s.
    Intel has a ton of options in their control panel for their NICs and
    I've tried them all; jumbo frames, flow control and many others and
    all I've done has not made any difference. The Intel diagnostics
    report nothing wrong and also tell me that my cables are of good
    quality. The switch supports 9k jumbo frames as well.
    I asked this question on another forum, and someone mentioned "windows
    network throttling", but gave no other advice. Anyway, if you use
    gigabit equipment I would appreciate it if you could chime in with
    your speeds (provided you have the ability to monitor it). I think
    DUMeter works for 30 days until requiring registration. Get it here:
    http://www.hageltech.com. Or if you have any sage advice for Intel NIC
    settings.

    My machines:
    MSI K8N Neo, Athlon-64 dual core 4800 (939) 1 GB ram, Seagate 320 GB
    SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express NIC

    MSI P6N SLI (not using 2nd video slot), Core2Duo 6600, 2 GB ram,
    Samsung T166 400 GB SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express
    NIC

    MSI NEO2-FISR, Pentium 4 3.0, 500 MB ram, ! Maxtor 250 GB SATA 150,
    1 Seagate 200 GB SATA 150, Onboard Intel gigabit ethernet

    all machines using XP Pro SP3 beta

    Com 5 port gigabit switch: 3CGSU05

    TIA for any help/advice -HAL-

  10. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    null_pointer@nowhere.com.net.edu.gov.de wrote:
    > On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:10:22 -0400, "nicklax"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >> networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >> switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    >> you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    >> the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink" port
    >> (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to switch a
    >> certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your current router.
    >>
    >> And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    >> differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    >> network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    >> any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    >> manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    >> cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    >> Cat5e.

    >
    > I recently bought a 3com gigabit switch, a couple of cat6 cables and a
    > pair of Intel PRO/1000 pci-e NICs hoping to dramatically improve file
    > transfer speeds over the old 100 Mb interface. I transfer a lot of
    > movie and TV files (.AVI) and Virtualbox disk images (10+ GBytes)
    > among the three computers that are on this network; I used the built
    > in NIC on the third computer as it only had PCI slots. I use a program
    > called DUMeter to detect real speeds.
    > I've been somewhat disapointed at the speeds I've witnessed. First of
    > all, they bounce all over the place. And the top speed I've seen is
    > about 235 Mb/s (thats bits) with the average being 140-195 Mb/s. I was
    > hoping to see at least 600-700 Mb/s. I just read a consumer oriented
    > switch roundup on Tom's Hardware and all the switches are getting
    > 600-700 Mbps. My 100Mb/s switch commonly got around 93 Mb/s.
    > Intel has a ton of options in their control panel for their NICs and
    > I've tried them all; jumbo frames, flow control and many others and
    > all I've done has not made any difference. The Intel diagnostics
    > report nothing wrong and also tell me that my cables are of good
    > quality. The switch supports 9k jumbo frames as well.
    > I asked this question on another forum, and someone mentioned "windows
    > network throttling", but gave no other advice. Anyway, if you use
    > gigabit equipment I would appreciate it if you could chime in with
    > your speeds (provided you have the ability to monitor it). I think
    > DUMeter works for 30 days until requiring registration. Get it here:
    > http://www.hageltech.com. Or if you have any sage advice for Intel NIC
    > settings.
    >
    > My machines:
    > MSI K8N Neo, Athlon-64 dual core 4800 (939) 1 GB ram, Seagate 320 GB
    > SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express NIC
    >
    > MSI P6N SLI (not using 2nd video slot), Core2Duo 6600, 2 GB ram,
    > Samsung T166 400 GB SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express
    > NIC
    >
    > MSI NEO2-FISR, Pentium 4 3.0, 500 MB ram, ! Maxtor 250 GB SATA 150,
    > 1 Seagate 200 GB SATA 150, Onboard Intel gigabit ethernet
    >
    > all machines using XP Pro SP3 beta
    >
    > Com 5 port gigabit switch: 3CGSU05
    >
    > TIA for any help/advice -HAL-



    I use only 3Com OfficeConnect Gigabit switches. 5 and 8 port models.
    I've not measured throughput until tonight. Might be a little slower
    than the Netgear and D-Link gigabit switches they replaced even when
    transferring to my primary drive (WD Raptor 150) from a RAID1 server
    (2-WD250's). All ethernet interfaces are gigabit. Getting around the
    same speed you are.

    But I also changed virus checkers to AVG which may impact speed.

    Haven't tried any really large files. I'll rip a DVD and test transfer
    speeds. I'll report if there are any differences.


  11. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 21:51:49 -0500, Cal Vanize
    wrote:

    >null_pointer@nowhere.com.net.edu.gov.de wrote:
    >> On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:10:22 -0400, "nicklax"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >>> networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >>> switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    >>> you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    >>> the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink" port
    >>> (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to switch a
    >>> certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your current router.
    >>>
    >>> And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    >>> differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    >>> network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    >>> any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    >>> manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    >>> cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    >>> Cat5e.

    >>
    >> I recently bought a 3com gigabit switch, a couple of cat6 cables and a
    >> pair of Intel PRO/1000 pci-e NICs hoping to dramatically improve file
    >> transfer speeds over the old 100 Mb interface. I transfer a lot of
    >> movie and TV files (.AVI) and Virtualbox disk images (10+ GBytes)
    >> among the three computers that are on this network; I used the built
    >> in NIC on the third computer as it only had PCI slots. I use a program
    >> called DUMeter to detect real speeds.
    >> I've been somewhat disapointed at the speeds I've witnessed. First of
    >> all, they bounce all over the place. And the top speed I've seen is
    >> about 235 Mb/s (thats bits) with the average being 140-195 Mb/s. I was
    >> hoping to see at least 600-700 Mb/s. I just read a consumer oriented
    >> switch roundup on Tom's Hardware and all the switches are getting
    >> 600-700 Mbps. My 100Mb/s switch commonly got around 93 Mb/s.
    >> Intel has a ton of options in their control panel for their NICs and
    >> I've tried them all; jumbo frames, flow control and many others and
    >> all I've done has not made any difference. The Intel diagnostics
    >> report nothing wrong and also tell me that my cables are of good
    >> quality. The switch supports 9k jumbo frames as well.
    >> I asked this question on another forum, and someone mentioned "windows
    >> network throttling", but gave no other advice. Anyway, if you use
    >> gigabit equipment I would appreciate it if you could chime in with
    >> your speeds (provided you have the ability to monitor it). I think
    >> DUMeter works for 30 days until requiring registration. Get it here:
    >> http://www.hageltech.com. Or if you have any sage advice for Intel NIC
    >> settings.
    >>
    >> My machines:
    >> MSI K8N Neo, Athlon-64 dual core 4800 (939) 1 GB ram, Seagate 320 GB
    >> SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express NIC
    >>
    >> MSI P6N SLI (not using 2nd video slot), Core2Duo 6600, 2 GB ram,
    >> Samsung T166 400 GB SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express
    >> NIC
    >>
    >> MSI NEO2-FISR, Pentium 4 3.0, 500 MB ram, ! Maxtor 250 GB SATA 150,
    >> 1 Seagate 200 GB SATA 150, Onboard Intel gigabit ethernet
    >>
    >> all machines using XP Pro SP3 beta
    >>
    >> Com 5 port gigabit switch: 3CGSU05
    >>
    >> TIA for any help/advice -HAL-

    >
    >
    >I use only 3Com OfficeConnect Gigabit switches. 5 and 8 port models.
    >I've not measured throughput until tonight. Might be a little slower
    >than the Netgear and D-Link gigabit switches they replaced even when
    >transferring to my primary drive (WD Raptor 150) from a RAID1 server
    >(2-WD250's). All ethernet interfaces are gigabit. Getting around the
    >same speed you are.
    >
    >But I also changed virus checkers to AVG which may impact speed.
    >
    >Haven't tried any really large files. I'll rip a DVD and test transfer
    >speeds. I'll report if there are any differences.


    I'm also using AVG (free version). I'd really like to talk to the guy
    who ran those tests for Tom's to see how he got those speeds, but
    there wasn't any email link in the article.

  12. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    null_pointer@nowhere.com.net.edu.gov.de wrote:
    > On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 21:51:49 -0500, Cal Vanize
    > wrote:
    >
    >> null_pointer@nowhere.com.net.edu.gov.de wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:10:22 -0400, "nicklax"
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    >>>> networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    >>>> switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    >>>> you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    >>>> the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink" port
    >>>> (some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to switch a
    >>>> certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your current router.
    >>>>
    >>>> And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    >>>> differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    >>>> network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    >>>> any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    >>>> manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    >>>> cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    >>>> Cat5e.
    >>> I recently bought a 3com gigabit switch, a couple of cat6 cables and a
    >>> pair of Intel PRO/1000 pci-e NICs hoping to dramatically improve file
    >>> transfer speeds over the old 100 Mb interface. I transfer a lot of
    >>> movie and TV files (.AVI) and Virtualbox disk images (10+ GBytes)
    >>> among the three computers that are on this network; I used the built
    >>> in NIC on the third computer as it only had PCI slots. I use a program
    >>> called DUMeter to detect real speeds.
    >>> I've been somewhat disapointed at the speeds I've witnessed. First of
    >>> all, they bounce all over the place. And the top speed I've seen is
    >>> about 235 Mb/s (thats bits) with the average being 140-195 Mb/s. I was
    >>> hoping to see at least 600-700 Mb/s. I just read a consumer oriented
    >>> switch roundup on Tom's Hardware and all the switches are getting
    >>> 600-700 Mbps. My 100Mb/s switch commonly got around 93 Mb/s.
    >>> Intel has a ton of options in their control panel for their NICs and
    >>> I've tried them all; jumbo frames, flow control and many others and
    >>> all I've done has not made any difference. The Intel diagnostics
    >>> report nothing wrong and also tell me that my cables are of good
    >>> quality. The switch supports 9k jumbo frames as well.
    >>> I asked this question on another forum, and someone mentioned "windows
    >>> network throttling", but gave no other advice. Anyway, if you use
    >>> gigabit equipment I would appreciate it if you could chime in with
    >>> your speeds (provided you have the ability to monitor it). I think
    >>> DUMeter works for 30 days until requiring registration. Get it here:
    >>> http://www.hageltech.com. Or if you have any sage advice for Intel NIC
    >>> settings.
    >>>
    >>> My machines:
    >>> MSI K8N Neo, Athlon-64 dual core 4800 (939) 1 GB ram, Seagate 320 GB
    >>> SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express NIC
    >>>
    >>> MSI P6N SLI (not using 2nd video slot), Core2Duo 6600, 2 GB ram,
    >>> Samsung T166 400 GB SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express
    >>> NIC
    >>>
    >>> MSI NEO2-FISR, Pentium 4 3.0, 500 MB ram, ! Maxtor 250 GB SATA 150,
    >>> 1 Seagate 200 GB SATA 150, Onboard Intel gigabit ethernet
    >>>
    >>> all machines using XP Pro SP3 beta
    >>>
    >>> Com 5 port gigabit switch: 3CGSU05
    >>>
    >>> TIA for any help/advice -HAL-

    >>
    >> I use only 3Com OfficeConnect Gigabit switches. 5 and 8 port models.
    >> I've not measured throughput until tonight. Might be a little slower
    >> than the Netgear and D-Link gigabit switches they replaced even when
    >> transferring to my primary drive (WD Raptor 150) from a RAID1 server
    >> (2-WD250's). All ethernet interfaces are gigabit. Getting around the
    >> same speed you are.
    >>
    >> But I also changed virus checkers to AVG which may impact speed.
    >>
    >> Haven't tried any really large files. I'll rip a DVD and test transfer
    >> speeds. I'll report if there are any differences.

    >
    > I'm also using AVG (free version). I'd really like to talk to the guy
    > who ran those tests for Tom's to see how he got those speeds, but
    > there wasn't any email link in the article.


    When I was running the earlier switches, I got up to 600mbits tx rate.
    I figured the bottleneck was the hard drive read/write speeds. Now I'm
    wondering if AVG is the current bottleneck. I am going through two
    switches between the server and my main computer, but that shouldn't
    matter since its all gigabit.

    OK, I JUST completed a test of large file transfer (DVD). Averaged
    about 420mbits/sec to the server. 260mbits from server to PC. I would
    have expected opposite results, but there it is.

  13. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?


    >>>> I recently bought a 3com gigabit switch, a couple of cat6 cables and a
    >>>> pair of Intel PRO/1000 pci-e NICs hoping to dramatically improve file
    >>>> transfer speeds over the old 100 Mb interface. I transfer a lot of
    >>>> movie and TV files (.AVI) and Virtualbox disk images (10+ GBytes)
    >>>> among the three computers that are on this network; I used the built
    >>>> in NIC on the third computer as it only had PCI slots. I use a program
    >>>> called DUMeter to detect real speeds.
    >>>> I've been somewhat disapointed at the speeds I've witnessed. First of
    >>>> all, they bounce all over the place. And the top speed I've seen is
    >>>> about 235 Mb/s (thats bits) with the average being 140-195 Mb/s. I was
    >>>> hoping to see at least 600-700 Mb/s. I just read a consumer oriented
    >>>> switch roundup on Tom's Hardware and all the switches are getting
    >>>> 600-700 Mbps. My 100Mb/s switch commonly got around 93 Mb/s.
    >>>> Intel has a ton of options in their control panel for their NICs and
    >>>> I've tried them all; jumbo frames, flow control and many others and
    >>>> all I've done has not made any difference. The Intel diagnostics
    >>>> report nothing wrong and also tell me that my cables are of good
    >>>> quality. The switch supports 9k jumbo frames as well.
    >>>> I asked this question on another forum, and someone mentioned "windows
    >>>> network throttling", but gave no other advice. Anyway, if you use
    >>>> gigabit equipment I would appreciate it if you could chime in with
    >>>> your speeds (provided you have the ability to monitor it). I think
    >>>> DUMeter works for 30 days until requiring registration. Get it here:
    >>>> http://www.hageltech.com. Or if you have any sage advice for Intel NIC
    >>>> settings.
    >>>>
    >>>> My machines:
    >>>> MSI K8N Neo, Athlon-64 dual core 4800 (939) 1 GB ram, Seagate 320 GB
    >>>> SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express NIC
    >>>>
    >>>> MSI P6N SLI (not using 2nd video slot), Core2Duo 6600, 2 GB ram,
    >>>> Samsung T166 400 GB SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express
    >>>> NIC
    >>>>
    >>>> MSI NEO2-FISR, Pentium 4 3.0, 500 MB ram, ! Maxtor 250 GB SATA 150,
    >>>> 1 Seagate 200 GB SATA 150, Onboard Intel gigabit ethernet
    >>>>
    >>>> all machines using XP Pro SP3 beta
    >>>>
    >>>> Com 5 port gigabit switch: 3CGSU05
    >>>>
    >>>> TIA for any help/advice -HAL-
    >>>
    >>> I use only 3Com OfficeConnect Gigabit switches. 5 and 8 port models.
    >>> I've not measured throughput until tonight. Might be a little slower
    >>> than the Netgear and D-Link gigabit switches they replaced even when
    >>> transferring to my primary drive (WD Raptor 150) from a RAID1 server
    >>> (2-WD250's). All ethernet interfaces are gigabit. Getting around the
    >>> same speed you are.
    >>>
    >>> But I also changed virus checkers to AVG which may impact speed.
    >>>
    >>> Haven't tried any really large files. I'll rip a DVD and test transfer
    >>> speeds. I'll report if there are any differences.

    >>
    >> I'm also using AVG (free version). I'd really like to talk to the guy
    >> who ran those tests for Tom's to see how he got those speeds, but
    >> there wasn't any email link in the article.

    >
    >When I was running the earlier switches, I got up to 600mbits tx rate.
    >I figured the bottleneck was the hard drive read/write speeds. Now I'm
    >wondering if AVG is the current bottleneck. I am going through two
    >switches between the server and my main computer, but that shouldn't
    >matter since its all gigabit.
    >
    >OK, I JUST completed a test of large file transfer (DVD). Averaged
    >about 420mbits/sec to the server. 260mbits from server to PC. I would
    >have expected opposite results, but there it is.


    I just booted both computers into "safe mode with network support" and
    transferred a large file and got about the same speeds, so I don't
    think that AVG or any other process is slowing things down.

  14. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    Which programmes are you using to benchmark your local network speeds?

    I.E:
    ftp
    ssh
    Windows drag & drop from one window to a share
    A Download from a local web server over http


  15. Re: How do I get Gigabit throughput on Home network?

    > (original poster wanted to know why he was getting poorer than expected
    > performance with 1000Mb/second Ethernet.)

    . More than 5 years ago I saw a USENET post that said that the
    response time for 1000Mb/second Ethernet was actually longer than
    for 100Mb Ethernet. Even if ACK time did scale with bit rate
    we still have to consider the affect of ACK time.

    Therefore I suggest that you try using more independent streams
    for the data transmission. (Before 1995, using with 100Mb
    Ethernet, I just used multiple simultaneous copy operations to
    accomplish this, but surely there is a benchmark available now that
    just sets up multiple independent transfer streams eliminating disk
    delays and time of transfer problems.)

    For example, I might be able to send data to Mars at 1Kb per second,
    but if I wait for ACKs after every packet I'd be lucky to get 1
    packet/10 minutes.

    Similarly, we can transmit 1.5KB in about 12 microseconds on 1000Mb
    Ethernet, but if we wait 1 millisecond for an ACK and only send
    10 packets at a time we only get to run at 10000 * 1.5KB/second,
    or 15millionBytes/second, which is only 120Mb/second.

    Sending jumbo packets can increase throughput up, and I think did in
    the Toms Hardware tests. (There also can be a speed up due to
    reduced processing overhead with jumbo packets. The Toms Hardware
    discuses this also.)


    Also, the original poster seemed to think that 700Mb/second was a
    good goal. I disagree since much even US$50 network interface cards
    nowadays can use both paths at the same time in either direction.
    So, in whereas in the past a copy operation could only hope to run
    at 100Mb/second although two simultaneous copy operations in opposite
    directions could run at 100Mb/second each, now the goal should be
    to run a single copy operation at 2*1000Mb/second, with about a
    10% reduction for collisions.


    Here is what might be the original post:
    > On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:10:22 -0400, "nicklax"
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I'm sure that there are some routers out there that now support gigabit
    > >networks, but probably the easiest/cheapest way is to just get a gigabit
    > >switch like you said and hook all your computers up to it. And yes, all
    > >you'd do is have all your wired computers that support gigabit hooked into
    > >the switch, and then take a cable hooked into the net switch's "uplink" port
    > >(some have a dedicated/separate uplink port, some have a button to switch a
    > >certain port), and hook it to one of the lan ports on your current router.
    > >
    > >And no, you won't need to change anything in windows or set stuff up
    > >differently. The only exception would be if there's a setting in the
    > >network cards' drivers to turn on gigabit support or not.... I don't have
    > >any gigabit cards so I don't know if they auto sense or if you have to
    > >manually turn it on or something. Also, make sure all your network
    > >cables (patch cords, any cables run in the wall, etc...) are at least
    > >Cat5e.

    >
    > I recently bought a 3com gigabit switch, a couple of cat6 cables and a
    > pair of Intel PRO/1000 pci-e NICs hoping to dramatically improve file
    > transfer speeds over the old 100 Mb interface. I transfer a lot of
    > movie and TV files (.AVI) and Virtualbox disk images (10+ GBytes)
    > among the three computers that are on this network; I used the built
    > in NIC on the third computer as it only had PCI slots. I use a program
    > called DUMeter to detect real speeds.
    > I've been somewhat disapointed at the speeds I've witnessed. First of
    > all, they bounce all over the place. And the top speed I've seen is
    > about 235 Mb/s (thats bits) with the average being 140-195 Mb/s. I was
    > hoping to see at least 600-700 Mb/s. I just read a consumer oriented
    > switch roundup on Tom's Hardware and all the switches are getting
    > 600-700 Mbps. My 100Mb/s switch commonly got around 93 Mb/s.
    > Intel has a ton of options in their control panel for their NICs and
    > I've tried them all; jumbo frames, flow control and many others and
    > all I've done has not made any difference. The Intel diagnostics
    > report nothing wrong and also tell me that my cables are of good
    > quality. The switch supports 9k jumbo frames as well.
    > I asked this question on another forum, and someone mentioned "windows
    > network throttling", but gave no other advice. Anyway, if you use
    > gigabit equipment I would appreciate it if you could chime in with
    > your speeds (provided you have the ability to monitor it). I think
    > DUMeter works for 30 days until requiring registration. Get it here:
    > http://www.hageltech.com. Or if you have any sage advice for Intel NIC
    > settings.
    >
    > My machines:
    > MSI K8N Neo, Athlon-64 dual core 4800 (939) 1 GB ram, Seagate 320 GB
    > SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express NIC
    >
    > MSI P6N SLI (not using 2nd video slot), Core2Duo 6600, 2 GB ram,
    > Samsung T166 400 GB SATA 300, Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop pci-express
    > NIC
    >
    > MSI NEO2-FISR, Pentium 4 3.0, 500 MB ram, ! Maxtor 250 GB SATA 150,
    > 1 Seagate 200 GB SATA 150, Onboard Intel gigabit ethernet
    >
    > all machines using XP Pro SP3 beta
    >
    > Com 5 port gigabit switch: 3CGSU05
    >
    > TIA for any help/advice -HAL-


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