remote office - Routers

This is a discussion on remote office - Routers ; quick question . Have an office in Seattle (home office) 35 users windows domain. Have an office in Colorado 5 users no domain (right now). The office in Colorado is projected to grow probably into more of a domain scenario. ...

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Thread: remote office

  1. remote office

    quick question .

    Have an office in Seattle (home office) 35 users windows domain. Have an
    office in Colorado 5 users no domain (right now).

    The office in Colorado is projected to grow probably into more of a domain
    scenario.

    Curious on the best way or ways to make the two office better networked
    together?

    thanks



  2. Re: remote office

    geo wrote:

    > quick question .
    >
    > Have an office in Seattle (home office) 35 users windows domain. Have an
    > office in Colorado 5 users no domain (right now).
    >
    > The office in Colorado is projected to grow probably into more of a domain
    > scenario.
    >
    > Curious on the best way or ways to make the two office better networked
    > together?
    >
    > thanks


    I assume you already have an Internet connection at the home office and
    should have one for the Colorado office. If so, then I would recommend you
    create a router to router VPN between the two locations and run the
    Colorado office as a subnet of the first. The two sites will act as though
    they are physically connected with a network cable.

    Most routers can do this and I would recommend using IPSEC. I would also
    recommend using Netopia 33xx-ENT series router as they do this very very
    well and are extremely reliable.

    Good luck and let us know what you end up with.


  3. Re: remote office


    "bobmct" wrote in message
    news:jqxCg.1$q46.608@news.ntplx.net...
    > geo wrote:
    >
    >> quick question .
    >>
    >> Have an office in Seattle (home office) 35 users windows domain. Have an
    >> office in Colorado 5 users no domain (right now).
    >>
    >> The office in Colorado is projected to grow probably into more of a
    >> domain
    >> scenario.
    >>
    >> Curious on the best way or ways to make the two office better networked
    >> together?
    >>
    >> thanks

    >
    > I assume you already have an Internet connection at the home office and
    > should have one for the Colorado office. If so, then I would recommend
    > you
    > create a router to router VPN between the two locations and run the
    > Colorado office as a subnet of the first. The two sites will act as
    > though
    > they are physically connected with a network cable.
    >
    > Most routers can do this and I would recommend using IPSEC. I would also
    > recommend using Netopia 33xx-ENT series router as they do this very very
    > well and are extremely reliable.
    >
    > Good luck and let us know what you end up with.
    >



    Thanks. If I have people authenticating into a domain would I need a domain
    controller on subnet A and subnet B or the one domain controller in subnet A
    is good enough?




  4. Re: remote office


    "bobmct" wrote in message
    news:jqxCg.1$q46.608@news.ntplx.net...
    > geo wrote:
    >
    >> quick question .
    >>
    >> Have an office in Seattle (home office) 35 users windows domain. Have an
    >> office in Colorado 5 users no domain (right now).
    >>
    >> The office in Colorado is projected to grow probably into more of a
    >> domain
    >> scenario.
    >>
    >> Curious on the best way or ways to make the two office better networked
    >> together?
    >>
    >> thanks

    >
    > I assume you already have an Internet connection at the home office and
    > should have one for the Colorado office. If so, then I would recommend
    > you
    > create a router to router VPN between the two locations and run the
    > Colorado office as a subnet of the first. The two sites will act as
    > though
    > they are physically connected with a network cable.
    >
    > Most routers can do this and I would recommend using IPSEC. I would also
    > recommend using Netopia 33xx-ENT series router as they do this very very
    > well and are extremely reliable.
    >
    > Good luck and let us know what you end up with.
    >


    Oh yes the home office has a fractional t-1 768K and the remote office is
    cable broadband.

    The remote office though has to be VERY SIMPLE if you know what I mean.
    Basically the person(s) there will basically want to turn their laptop on
    and be connected and not really have to know how to do anything.



  5. Re: remote office

    If you set up this vpn via the remote office and the home office. At the
    remote office with the cable modem will the users on that end ALWAYS go out
    through the cable modem to the home office then out to the internet?

    Or could they just go out to the public internet via the cable modem
    locally?





  6. Re: remote office

    geo wrote:

    > If you set up this vpn via the remote office and the home office. At the
    > remote office with the cable modem will the users on that end ALWAYS go
    > out through the cable modem to the home office then out to the internet?
    >
    > Or could they just go out to the public internet via the cable modem
    > locally?


    Geo;

    I'm glad it making "some" sense to you now. Answering the question you
    posed in the prior post... NO, you would NOT have to look at other
    solutions if you grow. These product will scale pretty well based on the
    numbers you've talked about.

    Regarding the remote office's access to the Internet... it can go either way
    depending on how you configure it. If you absolutely positively want them
    to pass through the Watchdog, then you would define the remote users'
    Internet route to be the Watchdog which would then turn around and route to
    the Internet. But mostly the defined gateway for the remotes would be
    their router meaning that any IP outside of the local/home subnets would be
    routed to the Internet. Its really that simple.

    Another thought for you remote very remote/transient salespeople... its
    possible to setup multiple VPN's on any of these Netopia routers, even ones
    that are not IP depended but use PKI authentication. That way if your
    sales person is ANYWHERE but has access to the Internet (i.e.: hotel,
    client location, his/her home, etc) they simply start their defined VPN
    that has the IP of the home office VPM and they'll be
    handled/authenticated/connected securely.

    Don't forget to visit the Netopia site to view the tech documents. These two
    links should get you started:
    http://www.netopia.com/support/hardware/3387wgent.html
    http://www.netopia.com/support/hardware/4622xl.html

    Good luck and please post what your final solution becomes.

    Bob

  7. Re: remote office

    Thanks Bob,

    Now you got all kinds of ideas in my head

    I knew all this was possible I just figured it was super expensive. I am
    liking what I see so far with the Netopia. I have been on their site a lot
    the last couple of days. I can't believe you can get that wireless 3387
    for somewhere in the neighborhood of $140 and still do all that stuff.
    Then get an home office router for ~$900 Cisco would be thousands.
    If anything it makes sense to at least try it for those dollars.

    Remote Office -

    I don't need them to pass through the Watchguard Firebox, I'd rather
    they use what they have at the remote office to do typical internet
    stuff
    web browsing, e-mail etc. But with the ability to use the network at
    the
    home office. (map drives, printers, etc.)

    Sales Offices-

    There is only ONE person in these offices. They will typically move
    from office to office. It would be similar to the REMOTE OFFICE
    above.
    However these offices are right now using VONAGE VOIP. I would
    basically
    want sales to have the ability to connect to the home office to use
    the home
    office network (map drives, printers, save files in a user directory,
    etc.) But
    normal internet or e-mail can be handled locally instead of traversing
    the internet
    to go through the watchguard and then back out to the internet.


    What about home users? That may not have a Netopia router and you may want
    to do on a client by client basis? Would they just connect use native
    Windows VPN? Or probably something that watchguard has.

    Sorry for all this just trying to understand how it all ties together into
    the local lan.

    Thanks,
    George



    "bobmct" wrote in message
    news:jxuEg.8$C8.5227@news.ntplx.net...
    > geo wrote:
    >
    >> If you set up this vpn via the remote office and the home office. At the
    >> remote office with the cable modem will the users on that end ALWAYS go
    >> out through the cable modem to the home office then out to the internet?
    >>
    >> Or could they just go out to the public internet via the cable modem
    >> locally?

    >
    > Geo;
    >
    > I'm glad it making "some" sense to you now. Answering the question you
    > posed in the prior post... NO, you would NOT have to look at other
    > solutions if you grow. These product will scale pretty well based on the
    > numbers you've talked about.
    >
    > Regarding the remote office's access to the Internet... it can go either
    > way
    > depending on how you configure it. If you absolutely positively want them
    > to pass through the Watchdog, then you would define the remote users'
    > Internet route to be the Watchdog which would then turn around and route
    > to
    > the Internet. But mostly the defined gateway for the remotes would be
    > their router meaning that any IP outside of the local/home subnets would
    > be
    > routed to the Internet. Its really that simple.
    >
    > Another thought for you remote very remote/transient salespeople... its
    > possible to setup multiple VPN's on any of these Netopia routers, even
    > ones
    > that are not IP depended but use PKI authentication. That way if your
    > sales person is ANYWHERE but has access to the Internet (i.e.: hotel,
    > client location, his/her home, etc) they simply start their defined VPN
    > that has the IP of the home office VPM and they'll be
    > handled/authenticated/connected securely.
    >
    > Don't forget to visit the Netopia site to view the tech documents. These
    > two
    > links should get you started:
    > http://www.netopia.com/support/hardware/3387wgent.html
    > http://www.netopia.com/support/hardware/4622xl.html
    >
    > Good luck and please post what your final solution becomes.
    >
    > Bob




  8. Re: remote office

    geo wrote:

    > Thanks Bob,
    >
    > Now you got all kinds of ideas in my head
    >
    > I knew all this was possible I just figured it was super expensive. I am
    > liking what I see so far with the Netopia. I have been on their site a
    > lot
    > the last couple of days. I can't believe you can get that wireless 3387
    > for somewhere in the neighborhood of $140 and still do all that stuff.
    > Then get an home office router for ~$900 Cisco would be thousands.
    > If anything it makes sense to at least try it for those dollars.
    >
    > Remote Office -
    >
    > I don't need them to pass through the Watchguard Firebox, I'd rather
    > they use what they have at the remote office to do typical internet
    > stuff
    > web browsing, e-mail etc. But with the ability to use the network at
    > the
    > home office. (map drives, printers, etc.)
    >
    > Sales Offices-
    >
    > There is only ONE person in these offices. They will typically move
    > from office to office. It would be similar to the REMOTE OFFICE
    > above.
    > However these offices are right now using VONAGE VOIP. I would
    > basically
    > want sales to have the ability to connect to the home office to use
    > the home
    > office network (map drives, printers, save files in a user
    > directory,
    > etc.) But
    > normal internet or e-mail can be handled locally instead of
    > traversing
    > the internet
    > to go through the watchguard and then back out to the internet.
    >
    >
    > What about home users? That may not have a Netopia router and you may
    > want
    > to do on a client by client basis? Would they just connect use native
    > Windows VPN? Or probably something that watchguard has.
    >
    > Sorry for all this just trying to understand how it all ties together into
    > the local lan.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > George
    >
    >
    >
    > "bobmct" wrote in message
    > news:jxuEg.8$C8.5227@news.ntplx.net...
    >> geo wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you set up this vpn via the remote office and the home office. At
    >>> the remote office with the cable modem will the users on that end ALWAYS
    >>> go out through the cable modem to the home office then out to the
    >>> internet?
    >>>
    >>> Or could they just go out to the public internet via the cable modem
    >>> locally?

    >>
    >> Geo;
    >>
    >> I'm glad it making "some" sense to you now. Answering the question you
    >> posed in the prior post... NO, you would NOT have to look at other
    >> solutions if you grow. These product will scale pretty well based on the
    >> numbers you've talked about.
    >>
    >> Regarding the remote office's access to the Internet... it can go either
    >> way
    >> depending on how you configure it. If you absolutely positively want
    >> them to pass through the Watchdog, then you would define the remote
    >> users' Internet route to be the Watchdog which would then turn around and
    >> route to
    >> the Internet. But mostly the defined gateway for the remotes would be
    >> their router meaning that any IP outside of the local/home subnets would
    >> be
    >> routed to the Internet. Its really that simple.
    >>
    >> Another thought for you remote very remote/transient salespeople... its
    >> possible to setup multiple VPN's on any of these Netopia routers, even
    >> ones
    >> that are not IP depended but use PKI authentication. That way if your
    >> sales person is ANYWHERE but has access to the Internet (i.e.: hotel,
    >> client location, his/her home, etc) they simply start their defined VPN
    >> that has the IP of the home office VPM and they'll be
    >> handled/authenticated/connected securely.
    >>
    >> Don't forget to visit the Netopia site to view the tech documents. These
    >> two
    >> links should get you started:
    >> http://www.netopia.com/support/hardware/33877wgent.html
    >> http://www.netopia.com/support/hardware/4622xl.html
    >>
    >> Good luck and please post what your final solution becomes.
    >>
    >> Bob


    Geo;

    Ahhh, now you're beginning to see what I've been trying to say. Years ago I
    too believed that to do it well you required Cisco. I fought with their
    IOS for a long time trying to get things to work. I paid Cisco dearly for
    my annual tech support and they NEVER provided anything near what Netopia
    has been able to do.

    BTW - One of the 3387W models has a QoS mode to prioritize VoIP if that's
    what you need. Regarding the home users... you might have to stick with
    the normal VLans but that would be a good question to pose to the Netopia
    sales and/or tech support group to see what they recommend.

    I wish I had more info to answer but it sounds like you are well on your
    way. One last item... each of these routers, especially the main office
    recommended model 4622XL will support up to 15 different and concurrent
    VPN's. That should hold you for a while.

    Good luck.

    Bob

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