New to this - Routers

This is a discussion on New to this - Routers ; Alright, so this is a fairly new realm for me, and I'd like some advice. I can do research on my own, just need a jumping point. I've been tasked with organizing our small business network a bit. Here is ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: New to this

  1. New to this

    Alright, so this is a fairly new realm for me, and I'd like some
    advice. I can do research on my own, just need a jumping point.

    I've been tasked with organizing our small business network a bit. Here
    is what we have, and what we want. We currently have a router/firewall
    that is not locally managed, and an internal Class C LAN. (192.168.1.x)
    We would like to add more class C LAN's internally (192.168.2.x,
    192.168.3.x, 192.168,4.x) etc.. I realize (and have already played
    with) that we can use routers to transfer between the subnets, but

    1)would this mean I would need a router for each subnet? (3 in this
    example I gave).

    2) Also, I notice that most routers (cisco, etc) are set up for support
    of weird protocols on the WAN side, we just need static IP, is there
    something better for our application?

    3) Someone threw around the word "routing switch", but does this
    transfer between different subnet??

    Help me out here guys, where to start....


  2. Re: New to this

    > 1)would this mean I would need a router for each subnet?

    No. You need one router addressed to each logical network.

    > 2) Also, I notice that most routers (cisco, etc) are set up for support
    > of weird protocols on the WAN side, we just need static IP, is there
    > something better for our application?


    Hard to say. There's a few gotchas with Cisco. To assign multiple
    addresses to an interface you'll need to trunk a 100Mb interface to a
    switch which supports vlans. This will likely set you back a thousand
    dollars easy. You can accomplish the same thing with Unix for free with
    a spare machine.

    A Unix router and consumer-grade switch makes a good starting point.

  3. Re: New to this

    But isnt each subnet a logical network? (confused here..)

    Also, someone told me to get a layer-3 switch, and that would route
    between multiple (more than 2) subnets and do what I need, is this true?


  4. Re: New to this

    > But isnt each subnet a logical network?

    Precisely.

    > Also, someone told me to get a layer-3 switch, and that would route
    > between multiple (more than 2) subnets and do what I need, is this true?


    I suppose. Never used one. Have you priced l3 switches? There's not much
    middle ground here. You can do it cheaply or pay $1000+.

+ Reply to Thread