Can DHCP be used with a switch? - Routers

This is a discussion on Can DHCP be used with a switch? - Routers ; I currently have four PC's connected to a router that supports DHCP, and they are all configured to acquire network addresses automatically. If I now want to connect 4 more, can I use just a switch (the router only supports ...

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Thread: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

  1. Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    I currently have four PC's connected to a router that supports DHCP,
    and they are all configured to acquire network addresses automatically.
    If I now want to connect 4 more, can I use just a switch (the router
    only supports 4 connections), and if so, can I have them all acquiring
    automatic addresses, or will I have to assign them manually? All the
    PC's are running Windows, are on the same Windows network (running over
    TCP/IP) and all require Internet access (via the router, which is
    connected to a broadband modem). I don't really see how the router can
    automatically assign multiple IP addresses if it only sees one device
    connected to it (the switch), but there's almost certainly something I
    don't quite understand here.


  2. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    Your current router is also a 4 port switch. Yes, you can uplink another
    switch to it and the router will assign the additional nodes lan ip
    addresses. I believe you garden variety router will assign up to 50
    addresses



    wrote in message
    news:1140394083.990745.174690@g43g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    >I currently have four PC's connected to a router that supports DHCP,
    > and they are all configured to acquire network addresses automatically.
    > If I now want to connect 4 more, can I use just a switch (the router
    > only supports 4 connections), and if so, can I have them all acquiring
    > automatic addresses, or will I have to assign them manually? All the
    > PC's are running Windows, are on the same Windows network (running over
    > TCP/IP) and all require Internet access (via the router, which is
    > connected to a broadband modem). I don't really see how the router can
    > automatically assign multiple IP addresses if it only sees one device
    > connected to it (the switch), but there's almost certainly something I
    > don't quite understand here.
    >




  3. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    wizofaus@hotmail.com wrote:
    > I currently have four PC's connected to a router that supports DHCP,
    > and they are all configured to acquire network addresses automatically.
    > If I now want to connect 4 more, can I use just a switch (the router
    > only supports 4 connections), and if so, can I have them all acquiring
    > automatic addresses, or will I have to assign them manually? All the
    > PC's are running Windows, are on the same Windows network (running over
    > TCP/IP) and all require Internet access (via the router, which is
    > connected to a broadband modem). I don't really see how the router can
    > automatically assign multiple IP addresses if it only sees one device
    > connected to it (the switch), but there's almost certainly something I
    > don't quite understand here.
    >

    finally, something I have experience with.

    I have a MS network, a wireless router, and a HUB.
    ( I think a hub is a little more primitive than a switch, but I think I
    don't know all there is to know about switches. )

    I switched from the hub to a router when DSL became available to me.
    Then I needed ONE MORE PORT - I wanted my PLOTTER to have a direct
    connection to the router so any computer could use the plotter without a
    dedicated computer with an LPT connection.

    One port on the hub is an uplink to the router, the computer I took off
    the and the plotter I added take up two ports on the hub. I effectively
    gain two ports....

    Even I could do it.

    Yes, Windows assigns IP addresses automatically, except that the plotter
    has it's IP assigned through the software in the plotter. No problems so
    far, been 6 months up & running.

    regards

  4. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?


    wrote in message
    news:1140394083.990745.174690@g43g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    >I currently have four PC's connected to a router that supports DHCP,
    > and they are all configured to acquire network addresses automatically.
    > If I now want to connect 4 more, can I use just a switch (the router
    > only supports 4 connections), and if so, can I have them all acquiring
    > automatic addresses, or will I have to assign them manually? All the
    > PC's are running Windows, are on the same Windows network (running over
    > TCP/IP) and all require Internet access (via the router, which is
    > connected to a broadband modem). I don't really see how the router can
    > automatically assign multiple IP addresses if it only sees one device
    > connected to it (the switch), but there's almost certainly something I
    > don't quite understand here.
    >

    The switch will be a transparent device and the PC's will act the same as if
    they were connected directly to the router. Just remember that one port on
    the router and one on the switch will be used for the uplink so in effect,
    if you have 4 ports on each, you will only be able to connect 6 PC's in
    total.



  5. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    Unless, you get a switch with more than four ports
    "Tony" wrote in message
    news:dtdv1l$imv$1@newsg2.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >
    > wrote in message
    > news:1140394083.990745.174690@g43g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    >>I currently have four PC's connected to a router that supports DHCP,
    >> and they are all configured to acquire network addresses automatically.
    >> If I now want to connect 4 more, can I use just a switch (the router
    >> only supports 4 connections), and if so, can I have them all acquiring
    >> automatic addresses, or will I have to assign them manually? All the
    >> PC's are running Windows, are on the same Windows network (running over
    >> TCP/IP) and all require Internet access (via the router, which is
    >> connected to a broadband modem). I don't really see how the router can
    >> automatically assign multiple IP addresses if it only sees one device
    >> connected to it (the switch), but there's almost certainly something I
    >> don't quite understand here.
    >>

    > The switch will be a transparent device and the PC's will act the same as
    > if they were connected directly to the router. Just remember that one
    > port on the router and one on the switch will be used for the uplink so in
    > effect, if you have 4 ports on each, you will only be able to connect 6
    > PC's in total.
    >




  6. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?


    RBM (remove this) wrote:
    > Unless, you get a switch with more than four ports


    It actually has 16. Anyway, I hooked it all up and it actually worked
    perfectly straight away, no re-configuring, rebooting etc. necessary.
    I only posted the question because someone else had tried it and it
    hadn't worked, so my initial assumption was that the router couldn't
    handle DHCP assignments for more than 4 connections, but obviously it
    can (I was also thinking that the router somehow cared which physical
    port the DHCP requests came in on, but presumably in fact it just
    examines the MAC address encoded into each packet).


  7. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    wrote in message
    news:1140734237.869641.300440@i39g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com
    > RBM (remove this) wrote:
    > > Unless, you get a switch with more than four ports

    >
    > It actually has 16. Anyway, I hooked it all up and it actually
    > worked perfectly straight away, no re-configuring, rebooting
    > etc.
    > necessary. I only posted the question because someone else had
    > tried it and it hadn't worked, so my initial assumption was
    > that
    > the router couldn't handle DHCP assignments for more than 4
    > connections, but obviously it can (I was also thinking that the
    > router somehow cared which physical port the DHCP requests came
    > in
    > on, but presumably in fact it just examines the MAC address
    > encoded
    > into each packet).


    I think one can connect up to 253 devices to a router by adding
    switches/hubs.

    --


    Travis in Shoreline Washington


  8. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    Travis M. wrote:

    > wrote in message
    > news:1140734237.869641.300440@i39g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com
    >
    >> RBM (remove this) wrote:
    >> > Unless, you get a switch with more than four ports

    >>
    >> It actually has 16. Anyway, I hooked it all up and it actually
    >> worked perfectly straight away, no re-configuring, rebooting etc.
    >> necessary. I only posted the question because someone else had
    >> tried it and it hadn't worked, so my initial assumption was that
    >> the router couldn't handle DHCP assignments for more than 4
    >> connections, but obviously it can (I was also thinking that the
    >> router somehow cared which physical port the DHCP requests came in
    >> on, but presumably in fact it just examines the MAC address encoded
    >> into each packet).

    >
    >
    > I think one can connect up to 253 devices to a router by adding
    > switches/hubs.
    >

    But that doesn't imply that the DHCP server built into a typical SOHO
    router will be able to serve them all.

    --
    The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.

  9. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    It's safe to say that various SOHO routers come with different DHCP lease
    capabilities. The SMC 7400VBR that we typically use can service all 252
    available addresses in any /24 network. You cannot change the subnet mask to
    larger or smaller than a /24, although you can specify any network from
    1.0.0.0 - 255.255.255.0. The default is to hand out 50 IP addresses from
    ..100 - .149, but you can set it as you please. Some "subscription-based"
    routers like a Watchguard will either (1) only hand out DHCP addresses equal
    to the number of licenses or (2) hand out all you want, but only service as
    many as there are licenses. It's always best to check out the capabilities
    before planning on any configuration.

    ....kurt

    "CJT" wrote in message
    news:43FE7534.6020009@prodigy.net...
    > Travis M. wrote:
    >
    >> wrote in message
    >> news:1140734237.869641.300440@i39g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com
    >>
    >>> RBM (remove this) wrote:
    >>> > Unless, you get a switch with more than four ports
    >>>
    >>> It actually has 16. Anyway, I hooked it all up and it actually
    >>> worked perfectly straight away, no re-configuring, rebooting etc.
    >>> necessary. I only posted the question because someone else had
    >>> tried it and it hadn't worked, so my initial assumption was that
    >>> the router couldn't handle DHCP assignments for more than 4
    >>> connections, but obviously it can (I was also thinking that the
    >>> router somehow cared which physical port the DHCP requests came in
    >>> on, but presumably in fact it just examines the MAC address encoded
    >>> into each packet).

    >>
    >>
    >> I think one can connect up to 253 devices to a router by adding
    >> switches/hubs.
    >>

    > But that doesn't imply that the DHCP server built into a typical SOHO
    > router will be able to serve them all.
    >
    > --
    > The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    > minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.




  10. Re: Can DHCP be used with a switch?

    "CJT" wrote in message
    news:43FE7534.6020009@prodigy.net
    > Travis M. wrote:
    >
    > > wrote in message
    > > news:1140734237.869641.300440@i39g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com
    > >
    > > > RBM (remove this) wrote:
    > > > > Unless, you get a switch with more than four ports
    > > >
    > > > It actually has 16. Anyway, I hooked it all up and it
    > > > actually
    > > > worked perfectly straight away, no re-configuring,
    > > > rebooting
    > > > etc. necessary. I only posted the question because someone
    > > > else
    > > > had tried it and it hadn't worked, so my initial assumption
    > > > was
    > > > that the router couldn't handle DHCP assignments for more
    > > > than 4
    > > > connections, but obviously it can (I was also thinking that
    > > > the
    > > > router somehow cared which physical port the DHCP requests
    > > > came
    > > > in on, but presumably in fact it just examines the MAC
    > > > address
    > > > encoded into each packet).

    > >
    > >
    > > I think one can connect up to 253 devices to a router by
    > > adding
    > > switches/hubs.
    > >

    > But that doesn't imply that the DHCP server built into a
    > typical
    > SOHO router will be able to serve them all.


    The User Guide for my Linksys BEFSR41 says it can serve 253.

    --


    Travis in Shoreline Washington


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