Switches and hubs in wireless networking - Routers

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Thread: Switches and hubs in wireless networking

  1. Switches and hubs in wireless networking

    If we want to have a LAN (for example a home network) connected to the Internet through a
    wireless router, do we still need a hub/switch? Or the wireless router does this job
    automatically, because it is wireless?

    If the wireless router can do this job by its own, how can it manage to "talk" with 200
    local PCs concurrently, for example?

    If we still need a hub/switch, are there wireless hubs/switches?


  2. Re: Switches and hubs in wireless networking

    Mike wrote:
    > If we want to have a LAN (for example a home network) connected to the
    > Internet through a
    > wireless router, do we still need a hub/switch? Or the wireless router
    > does this job
    > automatically, because it is wireless?
    >
    > If the wireless router can do this job by its own, how can it manage to
    > "talk" with 200
    > local PCs concurrently, for example?
    >
    > If we still need a hub/switch, are there wireless hubs/switches?
    >


    If you get a wireless ROUTER, not just an access point, it will
    ususually have a four port switch built-in. So you could connect four
    computers via ethernet cable. Or you could use one of the ports to
    connect another router or switch.

    Good luck, jimbo

  3. Re: Switches and hubs in wireless networking

    Your wireless router should handle any (reasonable) number of wireless
    computers. The mechanisms for supporting wireless are the same as for
    wired connections (ignoring bandwidth). Wires are just as anonymous as
    radio signals. LAN protocols identify the individual computers.


  4. Re: Switches and hubs in wireless networking

    Mike wrote:
    > If we want to have a LAN (for example a home network) connected to the
    > Internet through a
    > wireless router, do we still need a hub/switch? Or the wireless router
    > does this job
    > automatically, because it is wireless?
    >
    > If the wireless router can do this job by its own, how can it manage to
    > "talk" with 200
    > local PCs concurrently, for example?
    >
    > If we still need a hub/switch, are there wireless hubs/switches?
    >

    a home network with 200 computers?

    I know very little, but in the last few months DSL became available
    here, and I needed a router for than connection. It happens to be
    wireless, but I don't think that is relelvent. Presently I am using the
    router AND a hub because I needed ONE MORE CONNECTION for my plotter.
    Through the router, any computer can plot without any other computer
    needing to be powered up.

    Even if I had just one computer, when I went to an always on DSL I would
    want the router for the firewall it is.


    Wireless verses wire, comes down to throughput. Doesn't it? And
    convenience.

  5. Re: Switches and hubs in wireless networking


    "Mike" ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:dspea2$1r6$2@usenet.otenet.gr...
    > If we want to have a LAN (for example a home network) connected to the
    > Internet through a
    > wireless router, do we still need a hub/switch? Or the wireless router
    > does this job
    > automatically, because it is wireless?
    >
    > If the wireless router can do this job by its own, how can it manage to
    > "talk" with 200
    > local PCs concurrently, for example?
    >
    > If we still need a hub/switch, are there wireless hubs/switches?
    >


    Usually, as Jimbo said, you got a built-in switch with the wireless router.
    If 4 ports are
    sufficient for your (wired) needs then go ahead. If you need more ports
    (and I mean wired ports) then you need a switch to plug in one of the 4
    ports. In addition you have 253 additional ports (wireless) that share the
    throughput (usually 54 Mbit/s): in other words you must consider a wireless
    router as a chain of a 2 ports router (a WAN port and a LAN port) + a four
    ports switch + a 253 ports hub (wireless). In total you have 254 logical
    ports available on the LAN side and all that ports are handled via DHCP and
    NAT (Note: all the ports are on the same network and usually the IP #1, i.e.
    192.168.0.1, is for management).
    On the WAN side you have one port handled by your ISP (usually via DHCP as
    well) !
    Of course I'm speaking of wireless routers that will cost from 50 to 75
    euros !

    I do hope this could help

    Regards

    Luc



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