shotgun connections ? - Routers

This is a discussion on shotgun connections ? - Routers ; Hi, Just a very theoretical question here, about having parallel connections from one computer to a router. I have a īD-Link DGL-4300 router with gigabit switch and WLAN. On one computer I have a gigabit ethernet adapter on the motherboard, ...

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Thread: shotgun connections ?

  1. shotgun connections ?

    Hi,

    Just a very theoretical question here, about having parallel connections
    from one computer to a router.

    I have a īD-Link DGL-4300 router with gigabit switch and WLAN. On one
    computer I have a gigabit ethernet adapter on the motherboard, and a WLAN
    adapter. Both get an IP from the same D-link device, and with both I can
    access the internet and browse the computers on my home network.

    I have been using the wired connection for big file transfers (HDD backups,
    etc...) and usually only the WLAN connection is up so no messy cables are
    around. I always disable the unused connection. When both are enabled
    though, the traffic seems to go through the interface that was already up
    when I activate the other, never through the one that has been activated
    last, judging from the file transfer speed.

    I really don't need more speed, on the gigabit adapters my files transfers
    are limited byt my slow hard drive sustained read/write speeds (about
    30MB/sec) . But is there a way to have both connections work in parallel ?
    Some specific program ? What instance decides which ethernet interface will
    carry the traffic ?

    What about 2 computers with 2 NICS each, connected through 2 crossover
    cables. Can the connections be "shotgunned" ?

    All explanations and URLs welcome, thank you.

    Lorenzo



  2. Re: shotgun connections ?

    Lorenzo Sandini wrote:

    > I really don't need more speed, on the gigabit adapters my files transfers
    > are limited byt my slow hard drive sustained read/write speeds (about
    > 30MB/sec) . But is there a way to have both connections work in parallel ?


    If your HD is running flat out, what willyou achieve using both
    connections ?

    You might be able to route traffic (get into MS-DOS and use 'route
    print' and investigate the route command yourself) but I guess the only
    way this would assist would be if you had two gateways on your LAN. I've
    used this to have some traffic (DNS lookups, for example) go via a fixed
    IP on one ISP, and browsing [where I don't want to use a fixed IP] going
    through a different ISP with dynamic IP... works fine with two gateways,
    and only one ethernet connection, but I can see little point in using a
    wireless link when your higher speed connection is also connected,
    unless it is mostly to experiment (in which case the handling by
    Windows will cause more problems than give solutions, IMO!)

    > What instance decides which ethernet interface will carry the traffic ?


    Windows will tend to use one that it knows about. I thought it used
    the last one where it had done a PPP connection, but there is none
    in your case, if your transfers were to local PCs. Ask Microsoft :-)


  3. Re: shotgun connections ?


    "Peter M" wrote in message
    news:43e524fc$0$82627$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net...
    > Lorenzo Sandini wrote:
    >
    >> I really don't need more speed, on the gigabit adapters my files
    >> transfers are limited byt my slow hard drive sustained read/write speeds
    >> (about 30MB/sec) . But is there a way to have both connections work in
    >> parallel ?

    >
    > If your HD is running flat out, what willyou achieve using both
    > connections ?


    Heh, as said, this is more a theoretical question than a real problem. Just
    wondering.

    BTW if I had 2 computers with fast RAIDs or RAM disks just to test the
    maximum transfer rates (with one NIC each), I wonder where would be the
    bottleneck ? Disk read/write, or ethernet traffic ? I doubt I would reach a
    steady 100MB/sec from physical disks. That just gives me an idea, let me
    find some RAM disk app for XP ;o)

    Have done a bit of reading, found this, in case anyone else is interested.
    Not exactly what I was looking for though.
    http://www.networkcomputing.com/914/914r2.html

    Thanks anyway.

    Lorenzo



  4. Re: shotgun connections ?

    From: "Lorenzo Sandini"

    | Hi,
    |
    | Just a very theoretical question here, about having parallel connections
    | from one computer to a router.
    |
    | I have a īD-Link DGL-4300 router with gigabit switch and WLAN. On one
    | computer I have a gigabit ethernet adapter on the motherboard, and a WLAN
    | adapter. Both get an IP from the same D-link device, and with both I can
    | access the internet and browse the computers on my home network.
    |
    | I have been using the wired connection for big file transfers (HDD backups,
    | etc...) and usually only the WLAN connection is up so no messy cables are
    | around. I always disable the unused connection. When both are enabled
    | though, the traffic seems to go through the interface that was already up
    | when I activate the other, never through the one that has been activated
    | last, judging from the file transfer speed.
    |
    | I really don't need more speed, on the gigabit adapters my files transfers
    | are limited byt my slow hard drive sustained read/write speeds (about
    | 30MB/sec) . But is there a way to have both connections work in parallel ?
    | Some specific program ? What instance decides which ethernet interface will
    | carry the traffic ?
    |
    | What about 2 computers with 2 NICS each, connected through 2 crossover
    | cables. Can the connections be "shotgunned" ?
    |
    | All explanations and URLs welcome, thank you.
    |
    | Lorenzo
    |

    While WINSOCK2 can handle Ethernet protocol connections bonded together the ISP or source PC
    must support bonding as well. Otherwise, forget about it. The standard OS will not bond
    two ethernet connections together adhoc.

    The bottlenecks are the sustained hard disk transfer rates, the PCI backplane speed and the
    disk controller.

    Think about quality disk sub-system components like Ultra 320 SCSI controller and disks.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm



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