switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size? - Routers

This is a discussion on switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size? - Routers ; I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have got on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using the same ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or peripherals. However, having just ...

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Thread: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

  1. switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have got
    on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using the same
    ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or peripherals.
    However, having just bought a new laptop with a WiFi card built-in I
    think it is time to go wireless.

    I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.
    I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.

    However, I find that the new cable which connects to the wall-socket
    (ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it than the old D-link router
    cable has.
    I have one of those frequency-splitter boxes on the phone-port
    (splitting the ADSL from the phone service), and it is that which has
    the smaller-sized port for the network cable from the router. - The new
    Belkin comes with an ordinary Ethernet cable for this connection.

    I find it is working ok if I connect the new Belkin router between my
    main desktop PC and the D-Link router. I can use the lappy via the WiFi
    when I do this, and of course the plug/socket sizes match ok. However,
    this makes the network topography a bit complicated, having two routers
    to configure ports on etc.

    Can I get a new ADSL/phone splitter with a larger LAN input, or a cable
    with full-sized ethernet plug at one end and a smaller one for the
    ADSL/phone port on the other end? Then I can get rid of the D-link and
    just use the Belkin.
    Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router assumes that there
    is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable to. - I don't have one,
    only the old D-Link Router which as I said, works fine on its own.
    Do I need a modem all of a sudden? - Why's that, if so?

    Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post more info if needed, but this
    hasn't been an easy problem to describe.

  2. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    why? wrote:
    > On Tue, 27 Dec 2005 22:28:31 +0000, anthonyberet wrote:
    >
    > x-post trimmed to 24HSHD from
    > 24hoursupport.helpdesk,uk.comp.home-networking,alt.comp.networking.routers
    >

    Out of interest, why snip the x-post?
    Not all x-posting is a bad thing, you know
    >
    >>I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have got
    >>on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using the same
    >>ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or peripherals.

    >
    >
    >>I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.

    >
    >
    > You cave the D-Link model, but not the Belkin.
    >

    Cave? - Do you mean save or have?
    - I don't follow in either case, sorry.
    >
    >>I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    >>ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.
    >>
    >>However, I find that the new cable which connects to the wall-socket
    >>(ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it than the old D-link router
    >>cable has.

    >
    >
    > RJ45 Ethernet on the Belkin.
    >
    > RJ11 Phone on the D-Link.


    Correct as far as the Belkin is concerned - probably also correct for
    the D-Link.
    >
    > You can't convert 1 to the other with any splitter / adapter / cable.
    > Well you can but it will not work.
    >
    >

    Ok...

    >>Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    >>The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router assumes that there
    >>is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable to. - I don't have one,

    >
    >
    > Correct that would be ISP - Cable Modem - RJ45 Ethenet (or USB) - Belkin
    > - Ethernet to PCs..
    >
    >
    >>only the old D-Link Router which as I said, works fine on its own.

    >
    >
    > The D-Link, would be ISP - RJ11 phone cable from wall to D-Link then
    > Ethernet to PCs.
    >
    >
    >>Do I need a modem all of a sudden? - Why's that, if so?

    >
    >
    > You most likely bought the wrong device.
    >

    Hmmm - you might be right - I did ask in the store if it would just drop
    in the place of the D-link.
    - However, this puzzles me a bit.
    Why is one router needful of a modem on my side of the ISP connection
    but the other not?
    Surely they shouldn't both be called routers with no qualifiers in that
    case?

    If I need a router-modem now, then how has it been working hitherto?

    >
    >>Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post more info if needed, but this
    >>hasn't been an easy problem to describe.

    >
    >
    > It could have been shorter.
    >

    Yes, it could have been. I doubt it would have flowed as nicely though

  3. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    anthonyberet , the dirty down-and-out and stumpy
    slave-boy who likes rough buttock jigging with koala bears, and whose
    partner is a pavement-pretty with a slimy axe gash, wrote in
    <41dtgrF1ecpamU1@individual.net>:

    > I hvae been uisng a D-inLk DLS0-54 roteur for a few yersa, and hvae
    > got on fnie wtih it wtih 3 cmotpuers rnunnig dfirfeent OsS, uisng the
    > smae ASDL cnocnetion, but not gnelraly sahnrig drveis or prehiperals.
    > Hwoeevr, hainvg jsut boghut a new latopp wtih a WFii crad biu-ltin I
    > tihnk it is tmie to go wrieelss.
    >
    > I boghut a Bekiln Wrieelss G Roteur (54 Mpbs) to go wtih the lpapto. I
    > had tohhugt it wuold jsut rpeclae the old D-inLk ruorte, as it has
    > prots for ehtneret calebs as wlel as the Wfii for the lapyp.
    >
    > Hwoeevr, I fnid taht the new cbale wihch cnocnets to the wlasl-ocket
    > (ei, out to my IPS) has a lagerr pulg on it tahn the old D-inlk roteur
    > cbale hsa. I hvae one of tohse ferequncy-splitter bxoes on the
    > poh-neport (pstliting the ASDL form the pohne srecvie), and it is taht
    > wihch has the samellr-sized prot for the nterwok cbale form the
    > ruorte. - The new Bekiln cmoes wtih an odrainry Ehtneret cbale for
    > tihs cnocnetion.
    >
    > I fnid it is wronkig ok if I cnocnet the new Bekiln roteur bteewen my
    > mian dseoktp PC and the D-inLk ruorte. I can use the lpapy via the
    > WFii wehn I do tihs, and of corsue the pulsg/ocket szies mtach ok.
    > Hwoeevr, tihs mkaes the nterwok tporogaphy a bit cmoiplcated, hainvg
    > two ruortes to cnogfiure prots on ect.
    >
    > Can I get a new ASDpL/hone slptiter wtih a lagerr LAN inutp, or a
    > cbale wtih flusl-ized ehtneret pulg at one end and a samellr one for
    > the ASDpL/hone prot on the ohter edn? Tehn I can get rid of the D-inlk
    > and jsut use the Blenki. Or am I msidunerstanding smoheting
    > fnumdaental hree? The se-utp ttuioral taht cmoes wtih the Bekiln
    > Roteur asseums taht tehre is a Mdoem to cnocnet the lagerr Ehtneret
    > cbale to. - I dno't hvae oen, olny the old D-inLk Roteur wihch as I
    > siad, wroks fnie on its onw. Do I need a mdoem all of a sdunde? -
    > Wyh's taht, if so?
    >
    > Srory to waflfe - wlil be hpapy to psot mroe ifno if needde, but tihs
    > han'st been an esay poreblm to dseicrbe.


    What?




  4. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    "anthonyberet" wrote in message
    news:41dtgrF1ecpamU1@individual.net
    > I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and
    > have
    > got on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs,
    > using
    > the same ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or
    > peripherals. However, having just bought a new laptop with a
    > WiFi
    > card built-in I think it is time to go wireless.
    >
    > I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the
    > laptop.
    > I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as
    > it has
    > ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.
    >
    > However, I find that the new cable which connects to the
    > wall-socket
    > (ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it than the old D-link
    > router cable has.
    > I have one of those frequency-splitter boxes on the phone-port
    > (splitting the ADSL from the phone service), and it is that
    > which
    > has the smaller-sized port for the network cable from the
    > router. -
    > The new Belkin comes with an ordinary Ethernet cable for this
    > connection.
    > I find it is working ok if I connect the new Belkin router
    > between
    > my main desktop PC and the D-Link router. I can use the lappy
    > via
    > the WiFi when I do this, and of course the plug/socket sizes
    > match
    > ok. However, this makes the network topography a bit
    > complicated,
    > having two routers to configure ports on etc.
    >
    > Can I get a new ADSL/phone splitter with a larger LAN input, or
    > a
    > cable with full-sized ethernet plug at one end and a smaller
    > one
    > for the ADSL/phone port on the other end? Then I can get rid of
    > the
    > D-link and just use the Belkin.
    > Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    > The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router assumes
    > that
    > there is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable to. - I
    > don't
    > have one, only the old D-Link Router which as I said, works
    > fine on
    > its own. Do I need a modem all of a sudden? - Why's that, if
    > so?
    >
    > Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post more info if needed,
    > but
    > this hasn't been an easy problem to describe.


    It would appear that your old 504 included a modem. Ask your ISP
    what modem you should use with your new router.

    --


    Travis in Shoreline Washington


  5. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    you can also keep your existing router and get a wireless access point to
    uplink to
    "Travis M." wrote in message
    news:9iksf.5349$Wl3.527@trndny04...
    > "anthonyberet" wrote in message
    > news:41dtgrF1ecpamU1@individual.net
    >> I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have
    >> got on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using
    >> the same ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or
    >> peripherals. However, having just bought a new laptop with a WiFi
    >> card built-in I think it is time to go wireless.
    >>
    >> I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.
    >> I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    >> ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.
    >>
    >> However, I find that the new cable which connects to the wall-socket
    >> (ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it than the old D-link
    >> router cable has.
    >> I have one of those frequency-splitter boxes on the phone-port
    >> (splitting the ADSL from the phone service), and it is that which
    >> has the smaller-sized port for the network cable from the router. -
    >> The new Belkin comes with an ordinary Ethernet cable for this
    >> connection.
    >> I find it is working ok if I connect the new Belkin router between
    >> my main desktop PC and the D-Link router. I can use the lappy via
    >> the WiFi when I do this, and of course the plug/socket sizes match
    >> ok. However, this makes the network topography a bit complicated,
    >> having two routers to configure ports on etc.
    >>
    >> Can I get a new ADSL/phone splitter with a larger LAN input, or a
    >> cable with full-sized ethernet plug at one end and a smaller one
    >> for the ADSL/phone port on the other end? Then I can get rid of the
    >> D-link and just use the Belkin.
    >> Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    >> The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router assumes that
    >> there is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable to. - I don't
    >> have one, only the old D-Link Router which as I said, works fine on
    >> its own. Do I need a modem all of a sudden? - Why's that, if so?
    >>
    >> Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post more info if needed, but
    >> this hasn't been an easy problem to describe.

    >
    > It would appear that your old 504 included a modem. Ask your ISP what
    > modem you should use with your new router.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > Travis in Shoreline Washington
    >




  6. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    anthonyberet wrote:

    >I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have got
    >on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using the same
    >ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or peripherals.
    >However, having just bought a new laptop with a WiFi card built-in I
    >think it is time to go wireless.
    >
    >I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.
    >I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    >ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.


    Your DSL-504 is a combined Router plus ADSL modem.
    Your Belkin Wireless G Router is probably just a Router without the
    ADSL modem capability.

    In order to make your new configuration work you will need either:

    1. A new DSL modem to connect between your Belkin Router and the
    telephone line with ADSL service.

    or

    2. To reconfigure the Belkin Router so that it works as a "Wireless
    Access Point" rather than a Router. This means accessing the internal
    configuration settings of the router and turning off the DHCP server
    and NAT firewall service, and possibly some other changes. The
    manuals for the router or Belkin's tech support should be able to give
    you the full details.

    You would then connect the Belkin to the D-Link with an RJ-45 cable
    network patch cable (may need to be a cross-over cable) and you should
    be in business.



    Good luck

    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP (1997 - 2006)
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

  7. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    Travis M. wrote:
    > "anthonyberet" wrote in message
    > news:41dtgrF1ecpamU1@individual.net
    >
    >> I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have
    >> got on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using
    >> the same ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or
    >> peripherals. However, having just bought a new laptop with a WiFi
    >> card built-in I think it is time to go wireless.
    >>
    >> I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.
    >> I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    >> ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.
    >>
    >> However, I find that the new cable which connects to the wall-socket
    >> (ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it than the old D-link
    >> router cable has.
    >> I have one of those frequency-splitter boxes on the phone-port
    >> (splitting the ADSL from the phone service), and it is that which
    >> has the smaller-sized port for the network cable from the router. -
    >> The new Belkin comes with an ordinary Ethernet cable for this
    >> connection.
    >> I find it is working ok if I connect the new Belkin router between
    >> my main desktop PC and the D-Link router. I can use the lappy via
    >> the WiFi when I do this, and of course the plug/socket sizes match
    >> ok. However, this makes the network topography a bit complicated,
    >> having two routers to configure ports on etc.
    >>
    >> Can I get a new ADSL/phone splitter with a larger LAN input, or a
    >> cable with full-sized ethernet plug at one end and a smaller one
    >> for the ADSL/phone port on the other end? Then I can get rid of the
    >> D-link and just use the Belkin.
    >> Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    >> The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router assumes that
    >> there is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable to. - I don't
    >> have one, only the old D-Link Router which as I said, works fine on
    >> its own. Do I need a modem all of a sudden? - Why's that, if so?
    >>
    >> Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post more info if needed, but
    >> this hasn't been an easy problem to describe.

    >
    >
    > It would appear that your old 504 included a modem. Ask your ISP what
    > modem you should use with your new router.
    >

    Goodness, you are right. It does have a built-in modem!
    How very peculiar of Linksys not to make the fact a bit more prominent.
    Thanks for your succinct reply. - There I was, under the impression that
    this type of connection didn't need a modem (or that this was handled
    by the ISP).
    Perhaps I will struggle on with the complicated topography for a bit -
    it seems a wireless access-point will be another 50gbp or so, and as the
    D-link router only handles 8mbps it will become a bottleneck shortly
    when I upgrade my ADSL to 24mbps. Or perhaps I will exchange the Belkin
    for a NetGear DG834G (which has a modem).
    Decisions, decisons...

  8. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    Ron Martell wrote:
    > anthonyberet wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have got
    >>on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using the same
    >>ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or peripherals.
    >>However, having just bought a new laptop with a WiFi card built-in I
    >>think it is time to go wireless.
    >>
    >>I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.
    >>I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    >>ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.

    >
    >
    > Your DSL-504 is a combined Router plus ADSL modem.
    > Your Belkin Wireless G Router is probably just a Router without the
    > ADSL modem capability.
    >
    > In order to make your new configuration work you will need either:
    >
    > 1. A new DSL modem to connect between your Belkin Router and the
    > telephone line with ADSL service.
    >
    > or
    >
    > 2. To reconfigure the Belkin Router so that it works as a "Wireless
    > Access Point" rather than a Router. This means accessing the internal
    > configuration settings of the router and turning off the DHCP server
    > and NAT firewall service, and possibly some other changes. The
    > manuals for the router or Belkin's tech support should be able to give
    > you the full details.
    >
    > You would then connect the Belkin to the D-Link with an RJ-45 cable
    > network patch cable (may need to be a cross-over cable) and you should
    > be in business.
    >

    Thank you. - Still a third option is to exchange the Belkin for a
    router/modem.
    I will think about it, bearing in mind that the shop-staff could have
    spotted this but didn't.

  9. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    anthonyberet wrote:

    > I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years, and have got
    > on fine with it with 3 computers running different OSs, using the same
    > ADSL connection, but not genrally sharing drives or peripherals.
    > However, having just bought a new laptop with a WiFi card built-in I
    > think it is time to go wireless.
    >
    > I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with the laptop.
    > I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link router, as it has
    > ports for ethernet cables as well as the Wifi for the lappy.
    >
    > However, I find that the new cable which connects to the wall-socket
    > (ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it than the old D-link router
    > cable has.
    > I have one of those frequency-splitter boxes on the phone-port
    > (splitting the ADSL from the phone service), and it is that which has
    > the smaller-sized port for the network cable from the router. - The new
    > Belkin comes with an ordinary Ethernet cable for this connection.
    >
    > I find it is working ok if I connect the new Belkin router between my
    > main desktop PC and the D-Link router. I can use the lappy via the WiFi
    > when I do this, and of course the plug/socket sizes match ok. However,
    > this makes the network topography a bit complicated, having two routers
    > to configure ports on etc.
    >
    > Can I get a new ADSL/phone splitter with a larger LAN input, or a cable
    > with full-sized ethernet plug at one end and a smaller one for the
    > ADSL/phone port on the other end? Then I can get rid of the D-link and
    > just use the Belkin.
    > Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    > The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router assumes that there
    > is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable to. - I don't have one,
    > only the old D-Link Router which as I said, works fine on its own.
    > Do I need a modem all of a sudden? - Why's that, if so?
    >
    > Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post more info if needed, but this
    > hasn't been an easy problem to describe.


    The D-link 504 is a ADSL modem with a built in 4 port router. You can chain
    rouers, but you must configure the second router as a switch by disabling
    dhcp. Here is the deal with connections. (Straight from the manual)
    ;

    The roter may be connected to any 10/100basse-t ethernet LAN or ethernet
    concentration device. Connection to an ethernet concentrating device such
    as a switch or hub should use standare twisted-pair cable with rj-45
    connectors. The 4 dedicated rj-45 ports on the router are a crossed (mdi-x)
    connection ports. Follow standard ethernet guidelines when deciding what
    type of cable to use to make this connection. Use cat 5 or better cable for
    100 mbps connections. You should use either crossed cable or normal
    straight-through cable and a crossover adapter when conneting the router to
    a normal (mdi-x) port on a switch or hub. Use straight through cable when
    onnecting it to an uplink (mdi-II) port on a hub or switch. When connecting
    the router directly to a PC or server use a straight-through cable The
    ethernet link LED indiacator corresponding to the onnected port will
    indicate a valid onnection.


  10. Re: switching from wired home LAN to WiFi - plug size?

    "anthonyberet" wrote in message
    news:41e8amF1e72u0U1@individual.net
    > Travis M. wrote:
    > > "anthonyberet" wrote in message
    > > news:41dtgrF1ecpamU1@individual.net
    > >
    > > > I have been using a D-Link DSL-504 router for a few years,
    > > > and
    > > > have got on fine with it with 3 computers running different
    > > > OSs, using the same ADSL connection, but not genrally
    > > > sharing
    > > > drives or peripherals. However, having just bought a new
    > > > laptop
    > > > with a WiFi card built-in I think it is time to go
    > > > wireless.
    > > >
    > > > I bought a Belkin Wireless G Router (54 Mbps) to go with
    > > > the
    > > > laptop. I had thought it would just replace the old D-Link
    > > > router, as it has ports for ethernet cables as well as the
    > > > Wifi
    > > > for the lappy. However, I find that the new cable which
    > > > connects to the
    > > > wall-socket (ie, out to my ISP) has a larger plug on it
    > > > than
    > > > the old D-link router cable has.
    > > > I have one of those frequency-splitter boxes on the
    > > > phone-port
    > > > (splitting the ADSL from the phone service), and it is that
    > > > which has the smaller-sized port for the network cable from
    > > > the
    > > > router. - The new Belkin comes with an ordinary Ethernet
    > > > cable
    > > > for this connection.
    > > > I find it is working ok if I connect the new Belkin router
    > > > between my main desktop PC and the D-Link router. I can use
    > > > the
    > > > lappy via the WiFi when I do this, and of course the
    > > > plug/socket sizes match ok. However, this makes the network
    > > > topography a bit complicated, having two routers to
    > > > configure
    > > > ports on etc. Can I get a new ADSL/phone splitter with a
    > > > larger LAN input, or
    > > > a cable with full-sized ethernet plug at one end and a
    > > > smaller
    > > > one for the ADSL/phone port on the other end? Then I can
    > > > get
    > > > rid of the D-link and just use the Belkin.
    > > > Or am I misunderstanding something fundamental here?
    > > > The set-up tutorial that comes with the Belkin Router
    > > > assumes
    > > > that there is a Modem to connect the larger Ethernet cable
    > > > to.
    > > > - I don't have one, only the old D-Link Router which as I
    > > > said,
    > > > works fine on its own. Do I need a modem all of a sudden? -
    > > > Why's that, if so? Sorry to waffle - will be happy to post
    > > > more info if needed, but
    > > > this hasn't been an easy problem to describe.

    > >
    > >
    > > It would appear that your old 504 included a modem. Ask your
    > > ISP
    > > what modem you should use with your new router.
    > >

    > Goodness, you are right. It does have a built-in modem!
    > How very peculiar of Linksys not to make the fact a bit more
    > prominent. Thanks for your succinct reply. - There I was, under
    > the
    > impression that this type of connection didn't need a modem
    > (or
    > that this was handled by the ISP).
    > Perhaps I will struggle on with the complicated topography for
    > a
    > bit - it seems a wireless access-point will be another 50gbp or
    > so,
    > and as the D-link router only handles 8mbps it will become a
    > bottleneck shortly when I upgrade my ADSL to 24mbps. Or perhaps
    > I
    > will exchange the Belkin for a NetGear DG834G (which has a
    > modem).
    > Decisions, decisons...


    Linksys did not build any of the modems/routers you have
    mentioned thus far.

    Doesn't you ISP provide you with a modem/router when you upgrade
    to the faster service?

    --


    Travis in Shoreline Washington


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