asking a webpage from outside my homenetwork. - Routers

This is a discussion on asking a webpage from outside my homenetwork. - Routers ; Hello everybody, I am just a junior programmer and I hope I am asking my question on the right newsgroup... At home I have two computers which are connected to the WAN by a router. The router (which is the ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: asking a webpage from outside my homenetwork.

  1. asking a webpage from outside my homenetwork.

    Hello everybody,

    I am just a junior programmer and I hope I am asking my question on the
    right newsgroup...
    At home I have two computers which are connected to the WAN by a router. The
    router (which is the DHCP server) gives this two computers always the same
    IP. So these IP's the router is giving, are not unique in the world, they
    are just unique in my home network. The only unique IP is the IP from the
    router which is connected to the WAN.
    I made from one of my two computers a server and it is no problem for me to
    ask a certain webpage on the computer with the server with my other computer
    (which lays in the same home network). Indeed in my home network the two
    computers have a unique IP, so I can just ask a certain webpage on the
    server by the following:
    "http://IPotherPCofHomeNetwork/directoryServer/certainWebpage". Now, my
    question is: How can I ask the same webpage on my homecomputer if I ask
    this webpage from another computer outside my homenetwork ??? Is this
    something like the following: "http://IProuterConnectedWithWAN/...


    Please, can anybody help me??? I am getting crazy of it ??
    Many Thanks,
    Steven.



  2. Re: asking a webpage from outside my homenetwork.

    One of the purposes of the router is to translate the internal addresses to
    your external address so that all the internal devices appear the same to
    the outside world. If you think about that, someone trying to access a web
    page would have no way of specifying which of your internal addresses to ask
    for.

    If your internal webserver's IP was 192.168.1.100 and your ISP assigned you
    64.233.161.104 (don't bother looking it up - it's Google), every system that
    you access going out of your router would think your address was
    64.233.161.104. That's fine, and your router will sort out which one of you
    will really get the response. If I wanted to hit your website by using
    http://64.233.161.104, how would the router know who gets the request? So
    the easy answer is "you can't".

    Most routers let you set up a 'forward port range' or some such (it might be
    under applications or gaming in the router setup). With that, you tell the
    router that any incoming request that goes to port 80 (the most common web
    server port) should be directed to 192.168.1.100 (or whatever your server IP
    is). That punches a tiny little hole in the firewall but should keep
    deflecting any othher port requests. Now, when I (on the outside) go to
    http://64.233.161.104, your router sees that I'm trying to access port 80 at
    that address and steers it to 192.168.1.100. Note that with a standard home
    router and broadband connection, you can only have one server using a given
    port number.

    That said, you might want to change the server's IP address to fixed to keep
    it from moving around. On that PC, turn of DHCP and set it to an IP address
    outside of the DHCP server's address pool.

    George

    "Steven Somers" wrote in message
    news:ayPPd.15205$EH5.6995@blueberry.telenet-ops.be...
    > Hello everybody,
    >
    > I am just a junior programmer and I hope I am asking my question on the
    > right newsgroup...
    > At home I have two computers which are connected to the WAN by a router.

    The
    > router (which is the DHCP server) gives this two computers always the same
    > IP. So these IP's the router is giving, are not unique in the world, they
    > are just unique in my home network. The only unique IP is the IP from the
    > router which is connected to the WAN.
    > I made from one of my two computers a server and it is no problem for me

    to
    > ask a certain webpage on the computer with the server with my other

    computer
    > (which lays in the same home network). Indeed in my home network the two
    > computers have a unique IP, so I can just ask a certain webpage on the
    > server by the following:
    > "http://IPotherPCofHomeNetwork/directoryServer/certainWebpage". Now, my
    > question is: How can I ask the same webpage on my homecomputer if I ask
    > this webpage from another computer outside my homenetwork ??? Is this
    > something like the following: "http://IProuterConnectedWithWAN/...
    >
    >
    > Please, can anybody help me??? I am getting crazy of it ??
    > Many Thanks,
    > Steven.
    >
    >




  3. Re: asking a webpage from outside my homenetwork.

    Steven Somers wrote:
    > Hello everybody,
    >
    > I am just a junior programmer and I hope I am asking my question on the
    > right newsgroup...
    > At home I have two computers which are connected to the WAN by a router. The
    > router (which is the DHCP server) gives this two computers always the same
    > IP. So these IP's the router is giving, are not unique in the world, they
    > are just unique in my home network. The only unique IP is the IP from the
    > router which is connected to the WAN.
    > I made from one of my two computers a server and it is no problem for me to
    > ask a certain webpage on the computer with the server with my other computer
    > (which lays in the same home network). Indeed in my home network the two
    > computers have a unique IP, so I can just ask a certain webpage on the
    > server by the following:
    > "http://IPotherPCofHomeNetwork/directoryServer/certainWebpage". Now, my
    > question is: How can I ask the same webpage on my homecomputer if I ask
    > this webpage from another computer outside my homenetwork ??? Is this
    > something like the following: "http://IProuterConnectedWithWAN/...
    >
    >
    > Please, can anybody help me??? I am getting crazy of it ??
    > Many Thanks,
    > Steven.
    >
    >



    You mean like to see if someone from the outside can connect to it?
    Easy. Just input your wan ip into your www browser and connect. If the
    router supports internal looping I think it is, then it will connect you
    to your wan ip which then goes to yer server. so if your wan ip is say
    45 then in IE you just enter http://ip.com and then you will connect. if
    it says page not found then the router doesn't support looping or
    whatever they call it.

    for me i can connect like this. i can connect to my pc which has a
    server for my router, my router sends info via logs to viewpoint
    software which is for my sonicwall firewall appliance. so viewpoint has
    a www server built in. over a special port for the viewpoint. so i would
    want to see if the outside can connect. i go in IE,
    http://myip.com:specialportlike7878 and then since my sonicwall will
    redirect looping, it connects. some routers do not and then say not found.

    basically do this. if you are trying to see if the outside can connect
    do this. in your router make sure it's set up a rule to forward to the
    server. then just find out what yer internet ip is and in IE type it in.
    http://yourip.com and hit enter. it will then either say page not found
    or it will load your servers page. the same thing goes for ftp server
    and so on. if it works awesome, if not then the router doesn't support
    that kind of redirect/looping or whatever it is called.

+ Reply to Thread