Book for Basics? - Routers

This is a discussion on Book for Basics? - Routers ; I have bought and read "Networking and System Integration for Dummies." But even this book will have things like a topic on DHCP as a possible strategy against static IPs--but without ever saying how one is even supposed to go ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Book for Basics?

  1. Book for Basics?

    I have bought and read "Networking and System Integration for Dummies."
    But even this book will have things like a topic on DHCP as a possible
    strategy against static IPs--but without ever saying how one is even
    supposed to go about setting a static IP. (I know that they should all
    be in the range 10.0.0.0 -> 10.255.255.255, 172.16.0.0 -
    172.31.255.255, or 192.168.0.0 -> 192.168.255.255, yet nothing says
    what you are supposed to do with the number you have chosen to apply it
    to an actual machine.)

    I have read how TCP/IP works many many times (and the OSI stack), and
    how collisions can slow down an ethernet so it is best to split things
    where there might be issues, but have yet to see anything which will
    tell me that between a switch, router, hub, patch panel (?), computer,
    and who knows what else, what order everything is supposed to go in to
    actually create an ethernet and then connect that to a T1 or other
    outside line.

    There seems to be this very thin layer of basic knowledge that all
    resources seem to assume you already know--or that it is all plug n'
    play so there is no need to know it (in the case of a home network.)

    Please if anyone knows of any book which actually lays out these basic
    core items, please tell me the title. Ideally I would be able to
    understand a full corporation networking system to a level that I would
    know enough to be able to understand why say a UPnPing network camera
    will not be visible to the outside world (simply a matter of tracking
    down what the outbound port is and asking our network guys to open
    perhaps?) or being able to design a secure network for a web
    application package without having to ask someone else whether or not
    the relationships between the servers I would hope for are possible.
    Thank you,
    Chris Williams


  2. Re: Book for Basics?

    My networking textbook from my university days is as follows:

    Computer Networks and Internets, Second Editionm 1999
    Douglas E. Comer
    Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-083617-6

    It goes into a lot of detail about everything, including network
    algorithms, topology, hardware, etc. The Dummy's book is a good
    starting point, and don't forget it was designed for dummys - people
    that have no clue what they're doing, and it sounds like you do. So, if
    you really want to know about networks, go to your local Chapters
    bookstore (do they have those in the US?) and take a browse through it.

    BTW, just noticed a URL on the cover (silly cover is white text on a
    white background :P) http://netbook.cs.purdue.edu Hey, that web site is
    really handy, check it out.

    Hope this helps.

    Paul Mak

    thesagerat@yahoo.co.jp wrote:

    > I have bought and read "Networking and System Integration for Dummies."
    > But even this book will have things like a topic on DHCP as a possible
    > strategy against static IPs--but without ever saying how one is even
    > supposed to go about setting a static IP. (I know that they should all
    > be in the range 10.0.0.0 -> 10.255.255.255, 172.16.0.0 -
    > 172.31.255.255, or 192.168.0.0 -> 192.168.255.255, yet nothing says
    > what you are supposed to do with the number you have chosen to apply it
    > to an actual machine.)
    >
    > I have read how TCP/IP works many many times (and the OSI stack), and
    > how collisions can slow down an ethernet so it is best to split things
    > where there might be issues, but have yet to see anything which will
    > tell me that between a switch, router, hub, patch panel (?), computer,
    > and who knows what else, what order everything is supposed to go in to
    > actually create an ethernet and then connect that to a T1 or other
    > outside line.
    >
    > There seems to be this very thin layer of basic knowledge that all
    > resources seem to assume you already know--or that it is all plug n'
    > play so there is no need to know it (in the case of a home network.)
    >
    > Please if anyone knows of any book which actually lays out these basic
    > core items, please tell me the title. Ideally I would be able to
    > understand a full corporation networking system to a level that I would
    > know enough to be able to understand why say a UPnPing network camera
    > will not be visible to the outside world (simply a matter of tracking
    > down what the outbound port is and asking our network guys to open
    > perhaps?) or being able to design a secure network for a web
    > application package without having to ask someone else whether or not
    > the relationships between the servers I would hope for are possible.
    > Thank you,
    > Chris Williams
    >



  3. Re: Book for Basics?

    Unfortunately, I am living in Tokyo so the best I can do is order from
    Amazon and hope that what I ordered actually has the information. Makes
    it very annoying to pay $20 for shipping on a $50 book just to have it
    repeat the same information I already know while still skipping over
    these fundamental items.

    Just browsing the internet I am getting:

    "You will need the following information: domain name or workgroup, IP
    address for each computer (unless you have a DHCP device in your
    network) and a subnet mask. [...] If you do not purchase a device such
    as those mentioned above, you will likely need to configure static IP
    addresses for each machine."

    But how do I configure...?!!!! Grrrr
    Lol

    Ah well,
    Am looking at that site now.


  4. Re: Book for Basics?

    There's really nothing magical about configuring static IP. Unless I am not
    understanding some meaning in your words and you are trying to do something
    more exotic than just that. What specifically are you having trouble with?

    In regards to your OP and question, I'm afraid I don't really have an
    answer. I've gotten rid of most of my books in a recent move and usually
    search Google for most questions I have. If I can recall or find any good
    books on the subject I'll be sure to let you know.

    Richard

    wrote in message
    news:1103599271.578051.148040@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
    > Unfortunately, I am living in Tokyo so the best I can do is order from
    > Amazon and hope that what I ordered actually has the information. Makes
    > it very annoying to pay $20 for shipping on a $50 book just to have it
    > repeat the same information I already know while still skipping over
    > these fundamental items.
    >
    > Just browsing the internet I am getting:
    >
    > "You will need the following information: domain name or workgroup, IP
    > address for each computer (unless you have a DHCP device in your
    > network) and a subnet mask. [...] If you do not purchase a device such
    > as those mentioned above, you will likely need to configure static IP
    > addresses for each machine."
    >
    > But how do I configure...?!!!! Grrrr
    > Lol
    >
    > Ah well,
    > Am looking at that site now.
    >




    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----

  5. Re: Book for Basics?

    I have actually figured out how to configure an IP (TCP/IP properties
    on the connection in Windows), I am just commenting on how wide-spread
    I have found this tendency for several just plain-old nuts and bolts
    stuff seems to be conspicuously missing from even sources that should
    have it. If my Dummies book just says, "Configure it", without saying
    where or how, this does me little good in various instances. For a true
    dummy who knows nothing, it could have been configured anywhere from
    the machine itself to having to set it on every other machine, to
    setting it in the router--until someone writes it down someplace for
    beginners to read, they have no idea where to start looking.
    Similarly, it seems that almost all books cover the same topics as one
    another but will skip entire subjects. So, for instance, I have a very
    good understanding of TCP/IP but couldn't tell you why NAT makes FTP go
    bad--and in fact only know of NAT and that NAT and FTP are incompatible
    because I cornered a network guy and got some info out of him. =\ But
    doing a complete search of all of the Table of Contents on Amazon and
    O'Reilly turned up amazingly sparse on this one subject. I finally
    turned up

    IP Addressing and Subnetting, Including IPv6
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...X0DER&v=glance

    which looks good from the Table of Contents and has an entire chapter
    just for NAT.
    So I think that essentially I am looking for books that are willing to
    talk about things beyond the big topics (TCP/IP, DHCP, UDP, OSI, etc.)
    and will discuss these things in a real world sense (i.e. now that you
    know how it works, here's how you actually do it on this machine and
    configure it properly.) I suspect that this may entail buying
    individual books for separate topics (like a UPnP book for UPnP), but
    at the moment I don't even know which acronyms to look for. My dummies
    book doesn't even mention NAT.

    Thank you,
    Chris


  6. Re: Book for Basics?

    thesagerat@yahoo.co.jp wrote:
    > I have bought and read "Networking and System Integration for Dummies."
    > But even this book will have things like a topic on DHCP as a possible
    > strategy against static IPs--but without ever saying how one is even
    > supposed to go about setting a static IP. (I know that they should all
    >
    >>>>>snip<<<<<


    I found this tutorial on IP adressing and subnets on the web:

    http://www.ralphb.net/IPSubnet/

  7. Re: Book for Basics?

    On 20 Dec 2004 18:20:27 -0800, thesagerat@yahoo.co.jp wrote:

    >I have bought and read "Networking and System Integration for Dummies."



    waddup Chris/ have you tried Nortons guide to networking. It was the
    book I read before getting any certifications. It gave me the
    knowledge to carry on into more vendor specific areas. It covers
    basics and fundamentals, but also relates them to real world network
    situations, and gives examples. After reading Norton's guide to
    networking, I moved straight over to the ccna for dummies book, and
    passed that test with no problem. Then I got a Nortel cert, a Sniffer
    cert, and my MCSE just for fun. I'm currently focusing on more
    advanced Nortel certifications, just cause Nortel rox, but I started
    with Norton's book. Sorry I don't have a number for the book, but it's
    worth looking up.
    Peace.


  8. Re: Book for Basics?

    How to configure manually? In windows it is donne thought
    controlpanel/networksettings and put in the static ip/subnetmask and
    router gateway addr (if needed) and you should be ready to go. and dhcp
    is normally included of any consumer grade router on the market, linksys
    comes to mind.

    thesagerat@yahoo.co.jp wrote:
    > Unfortunately, I am living in Tokyo so the best I can do is order from
    > Amazon and hope that what I ordered actually has the information. Makes
    > it very annoying to pay $20 for shipping on a $50 book just to have it
    > repeat the same information I already know while still skipping over
    > these fundamental items.
    >
    > Just browsing the internet I am getting:
    >
    > "You will need the following information: domain name or workgroup, IP
    > address for each computer (unless you have a DHCP device in your
    > network) and a subnet mask. [...] If you do not purchase a device such
    > as those mentioned above, you will likely need to configure static IP
    > addresses for each machine."
    >
    > But how do I configure...?!!!! Grrrr
    > Lol
    >
    > Ah well,
    > Am looking at that site now.
    >


+ Reply to Thread