Freeloaders using my network? - Routers

This is a discussion on Freeloaders using my network? - Routers ; In my home office, I've got a Linksys WRT545GS wireless router v. 1 with firmware 4.71.1 set to WPA AES security with a very strong and mighty long passphrase (I know, should use WPA2 but some of my wireless devices ...

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Thread: Freeloaders using my network?

  1. Freeloaders using my network?

    In my home office, I've got a Linksys WRT545GS wireless router v. 1 with
    firmware 4.71.1 set to WPA AES security with a very strong and mighty long
    passphrase (I know, should use WPA2 but some of my wireless devices can't
    handle that). SSID is changed and not broadcasting, MAC filter enabled.

    Can I tell if an outsider it trying to, has tried to-- or is using my
    network and internet connection?



  2. Re: Freeloaders using my network?


    "The Wheel Man" wrote in message
    news:cpudnZz2j-bLTVrVnZ2dnUVZ_hednZ2d@comcast.com...
    > In my home office, I've got a Linksys WRT545GS wireless router v. 1 with
    > firmware 4.71.1 set to WPA AES security with a very strong and mighty long
    > passphrase (I know, should use WPA2 but some of my wireless devices can't
    > handle that). SSID is changed and not broadcasting, MAC filter enabled.
    >
    > Can I tell if an outsider it trying to, has tried to-- or is using my
    > network and internet connection?
    >


    I don't know about the "tried to" part (you can check whatever logs the
    Linsys maintains for clues, but I doubt the router would log failed
    connection attempts - it *should* in my opinion, but...)

    Home routers typically have a page in their management web pages that shows
    the current dhcp assignments - that should show you who is connected or
    recently connected (depending on whether or not the router cleans that table
    properly)

    HTH



  3. Re: Freeloaders using my network?

    "Kerry Liles" wrote in message
    news:ga8k6h$51u$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    >
    > "The Wheel Man" wrote in message
    > news:cpudnZz2j-bLTVrVnZ2dnUVZ_hednZ2d@comcast.com...
    >> In my home office, I've got a Linksys WRT545GS wireless router v. 1 with
    >> firmware 4.71.1 set to WPA AES security with a very strong and mighty
    >> long passphrase (I know, should use WPA2 but some of my wireless devices
    >> can't handle that). SSID is changed and not broadcasting, MAC filter
    >> enabled.
    >>
    >> Can I tell if an outsider it trying to, has tried to-- or is using my
    >> network and internet connection?
    >>

    >
    > I don't know about the "tried to" part (you can check whatever logs the
    > Linsys maintains for clues, but I doubt the router would log failed
    > connection attempts - it *should* in my opinion, but...)
    >
    > Home routers typically have a page in their management web pages that
    > shows the current dhcp assignments - that should show you who is connected
    > or recently connected (depending on whether or not the router cleans that
    > table properly)
    >
    > HTH
    >
    >


    Cool-- thanks.



  4. Re: Freeloaders using my network?

    "The Wheel Man" wrote in message
    news_-dnaI6WajdbFrVnZ2dnUVZ_uGdnZ2d@comcast.com...
    > "Kerry Liles" wrote in message
    > news:ga8k6h$51u$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    >>
    >> "The Wheel Man" wrote in message
    >> news:cpudnZz2j-bLTVrVnZ2dnUVZ_hednZ2d@comcast.com...
    >>> In my home office, I've got a Linksys WRT545GS wireless router v. 1 with
    >>> firmware 4.71.1 set to WPA AES security with a very strong and mighty
    >>> long passphrase (I know, should use WPA2 but some of my wireless devices
    >>> can't handle that). SSID is changed and not broadcasting, MAC filter
    >>> enabled.
    >>>
    >>> Can I tell if an outsider it trying to, has tried to-- or is using my
    >>> network and internet connection?
    >>>

    >>
    >> I don't know about the "tried to" part (you can check whatever logs the
    >> Linsys maintains for clues, but I doubt the router would log failed
    >> connection attempts - it *should* in my opinion, but...)
    >>
    >> Home routers typically have a page in their management web pages that
    >> shows the current dhcp assignments - that should show you who is
    >> connected or recently connected (depending on whether or not the router
    >> cleans that table properly)
    >>
    >> HTH
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Cool-- thanks.
    >

    You might want to take a look at the program WallWatcher located at:
    http://www.wallwatcher.com/. It will read and keep track of the log your
    router provides. It will provide archive copies of the log results that can
    be searched by the program. Since the built in log can grow large enough to
    start erasing itself having an archive of log can make looking for your kind
    of problem much easier.

    While the author's site lists the program as shareware, the current price is
    $0.00 so it should be in anyone's budget range.

    Here is a small excerpt from the web page showing some of it's abilities.

    - provides filtering, immediate alerts, emailed alerts, historical analysis,
    summaries, and charts.

    - filters let you choose what data and time periods to log, display,
    analyze, and chart.

    - alerts offer real-time visual and audible signals of possible intrusion
    attempts.

    - historical analysis helps you find patterns of recent intrusion attempts.

    - summaries condense log histories for easier review
    user-selectable charts let you spot patterns of suspicious activities.



  5. Re: Freeloaders using my network?

    "GlowingBlueMist" wrote in message
    news:ga97mc$cdp$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    > "The Wheel Man" wrote in message
    > news_-dnaI6WajdbFrVnZ2dnUVZ_uGdnZ2d@comcast.com...
    >> "Kerry Liles" wrote in message
    >> news:ga8k6h$51u$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    >>>
    >>> "The Wheel Man" wrote in message
    >>> news:cpudnZz2j-bLTVrVnZ2dnUVZ_hednZ2d@comcast.com...
    >>>> In my home office, I've got a Linksys WRT545GS wireless router v. 1
    >>>> with firmware 4.71.1 set to WPA AES security with a very strong and
    >>>> mighty long passphrase (I know, should use WPA2 but some of my wireless
    >>>> devices can't handle that). SSID is changed and not broadcasting, MAC
    >>>> filter enabled.
    >>>>
    >>>> Can I tell if an outsider it trying to, has tried to-- or is using my
    >>>> network and internet connection?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I don't know about the "tried to" part (you can check whatever logs the
    >>> Linsys maintains for clues, but I doubt the router would log failed
    >>> connection attempts - it *should* in my opinion, but...)
    >>>
    >>> Home routers typically have a page in their management web pages that
    >>> shows the current dhcp assignments - that should show you who is
    >>> connected or recently connected (depending on whether or not the router
    >>> cleans that table properly)
    >>>
    >>> HTH
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Cool-- thanks.
    >>

    > You might want to take a look at the program WallWatcher located at:
    > http://www.wallwatcher.com/. It will read and keep track of the log your
    > router provides. It will provide archive copies of the log results that
    > can be searched by the program. Since the built in log can grow large
    > enough to start erasing itself having an archive of log can make looking
    > for your kind of problem much easier.
    >
    > While the author's site lists the program as shareware, the current price
    > is $0.00 so it should be in anyone's budget range.
    >
    > Here is a small excerpt from the web page showing some of it's abilities.
    >
    > - provides filtering, immediate alerts, emailed alerts, historical
    > analysis, summaries, and charts.
    >
    > - filters let you choose what data and time periods to log, display,
    > analyze, and chart.
    >
    > - alerts offer real-time visual and audible signals of possible intrusion
    > attempts.
    >
    > - historical analysis helps you find patterns of recent intrusion
    > attempts.
    >
    > - summaries condense log histories for easier review
    > user-selectable charts let you spot patterns of suspicious activities.
    >
    >


    Looks interesting...



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