(Yet another) Newbie question - Routers

This is a discussion on (Yet another) Newbie question - Routers ; > "Marten Kemp" wrote in message > news:fu37o7$jnb$1@aioe.org... >> > I have the following: >> > >> > enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com >> > => dyndns.com >> > => home IP address >> > => router virtual server for port 80 >> > ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: (Yet another) Newbie question

  1. (Yet another) Newbie question

    > "Marten Kemp" wrote in message
    > news:fu37o7$jnb$1@aioe.org...
    >> > I have the following:
    >> >
    >> > enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com
    >> > => dyndns.com
    >> > => home IP address
    >> > => router virtual server for port 80
    >> > => 192.168.2.200
    >> > => "production" webserver
    >> >
    >> > All this works perfectly. However, a link to a page
    >> > hosted on my test server (dingbat at 192.168.2.102)
    >> > fails when I try it from outside my network. I know
    >> > that the 192.168 range is private but there should
    >> > be some way to do this.
    >> >
    >> > I've groveled through the Fine Manuals but there
    >> > seems to be something that I'm missing. Probably
    >> > intuitively obvious to the most casual observer.

    >
    > Your problem has NOTHING to do with apache. (Note the follow-up group I've
    > selected)
    >
    > That's because you're using the wrong IP address at dyndns.com. What needs
    > to be listed there is the dynamic address you get from your provider for
    > your dial-up or DSL line. Then, at your router, you need to forward port 80
    > to your local IP.
    >
    > Even with all that, it still may not work. Your ISP may block port 80 as
    > customers (without business accounts that have static IPs) aren't supposed
    > to be running servers at home.


    The routing from dyndns is to the dynamic IP address
    from my ISP. The hardware router sends all port 80
    traffic to 192.168.2.200, and that part works just
    fine. Go to http://enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com to see.

    The problem is my trying to link to the test version
    of the page which is hosted by dingbat at 192.168.2.102.
    Whose /var/www directory is an smbmount of a folder
    on my WinXP machine.

    --
    -- Marten Kemp
    (Fix name and ISP to reply)

  2. Re: (Yet another) Newbie question

    On 2008-04-19 15:09:23, Marten Kemp wrote:

    >> "Marten Kemp" wrote in message
    >> news:fu37o7$jnb$1@aioe.org...
    >>> > I have the following:
    >>> >
    >>> > enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com
    >>> > => dyndns.com
    >>> > => home IP address
    >>> > => router virtual server for port 80
    >>> > => 192.168.2.200
    >>> > => "production" webserver
    >>> >
    >>> > All this works perfectly. However, a link to a page
    >>> > hosted on my test server (dingbat at 192.168.2.102)
    >>> > fails when I try it from outside my network. I know
    >>> > that the 192.168 range is private but there should
    >>> > be some way to do this.
    >>> >
    >>> > I've groveled through the Fine Manuals but there
    >>> > seems to be something that I'm missing. Probably
    >>> > intuitively obvious to the most casual observer.

    >>
    >> Your problem has NOTHING to do with apache. (Note the follow-up group I've
    >> selected)
    >>
    >> That's because you're using the wrong IP address at dyndns.com. What needs
    >> to be listed there is the dynamic address you get from your provider for
    >> your dial-up or DSL line. Then, at your router, you need to forward port 80
    >> to your local IP.
    >>
    >> Even with all that, it still may not work. Your ISP may block port 80 as
    >> customers (without business accounts that have static IPs) aren't supposed
    >> to be running servers at home.

    >
    > The routing from dyndns is to the dynamic IP address
    > from my ISP. The hardware router sends all port 80
    > traffic to 192.168.2.200, and that part works just
    > fine. Go to http://enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com to see.
    >
    > The problem is my trying to link to the test version
    > of the page which is hosted by dingbat at 192.168.2.102.
    > Whose /var/www directory is an smbmount of a folder
    > on my WinXP machine.


    I'm not quite sure what you want to do, but if you want to access a machine
    behind your router from the outside, you have to set up some kind of port
    forwarding. You could for example forward port 88 on the router to port 80
    on 192.168.2.102. Then you access your production server when going to port
    80 on your public IP, and your test server when going to port 88 on your
    public IP.

    Gerhard

  3. Re: (Yet another) Newbie question

    Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
    > On 2008-04-19 15:09:23, Marten Kemp wrote:
    >
    >>> "Marten Kemp" wrote in message
    >>> news:fu37o7$jnb$1@aioe.org...
    >>>>> I have the following:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com
    >>>>> => dyndns.com
    >>>>> => home IP address
    >>>>> => router virtual server for port 80
    >>>>> => 192.168.2.200
    >>>>> => "production" webserver
    >>>>>
    >>>>> All this works perfectly. However, a link to a page
    >>>>> hosted on my test server (dingbat at 192.168.2.102)
    >>>>> fails when I try it from outside my network. I know
    >>>>> that the 192.168 range is private but there should
    >>>>> be some way to do this.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've groveled through the Fine Manuals but there
    >>>>> seems to be something that I'm missing. Probably
    >>>>> intuitively obvious to the most casual observer.
    >>> Your problem has NOTHING to do with apache. (Note the follow-up group I've
    >>> selected)
    >>>
    >>> That's because you're using the wrong IP address at dyndns.com. What needs
    >>> to be listed there is the dynamic address you get from your provider for
    >>> your dial-up or DSL line. Then, at your router, you need to forward port 80
    >>> to your local IP.
    >>>
    >>> Even with all that, it still may not work. Your ISP may block port 80 as
    >>> customers (without business accounts that have static IPs) aren't supposed
    >>> to be running servers at home.

    >> The routing from dyndns is to the dynamic IP address
    >> from my ISP. The hardware router sends all port 80
    >> traffic to 192.168.2.200, and that part works just
    >> fine. Go to http://enthusiasts.dyn-o-saur.com to see.
    >>
    >> The problem is my trying to link to the test version
    >> of the page which is hosted by dingbat at 192.168.2.102.
    >> Whose /var/www directory is an smbmount of a folder
    >> on my WinXP machine.

    >
    > I'm not quite sure what you want to do, but if you want to access a machine
    > behind your router from the outside, you have to set up some kind of port
    > forwarding. You could for example forward port 88 on the router to port 80
    > on 192.168.2.102. Then you access your production server when going to port
    > 80 on your public IP, and your test server when going to port 88 on your
    > public IP.


    I guess I'm unclear about how routing really works.
    I was thinking that I could set something up to pass some
    port 80 traffic from one server to another within the internal
    network.

    --
    -- Marten Kemp
    (Fix name and ISP to reply)

  4. Re: (Yet another) Newbie question

    On 2008-04-20 19:25:03, Marten Kemp wrote:

    >> I'm not quite sure what you want to do, but if you want to access a
    >> machine behind your router from the outside, you have to set up some
    >> kind of port forwarding. You could for example forward port 88 on the
    >> router to port 80 on 192.168.2.102. Then you access your production
    >> server when going to port 80 on your public IP, and your test server
    >> when going to port 88 on your public IP.

    >
    > I guess I'm unclear about how routing really works. I was thinking that
    > I could set something up to pass some port 80 traffic from one server to
    > another within the internal network.


    In a way, it can be looked at quite simply: Incoming traffic has a
    destination address and a destination port. The destination address is your
    public IP, which gets translated into a local destination address by the
    router (NAT).

    You use the destination port to determine in the router to which local
    destination IP address to route this packet. You generally cannot route
    some port 80 traffic to one address and some of it to another IP address --
    what would be the criterion where to route it to?

    You can of course change the routing table, and have the traffic forwarded
    to one IP address during some periods and to a different one during others.
    Some routers have built-in scheduling facilities for this.

    You also can forward requests on the machine itself to another machine,
    having the appropriate piece of software running on the forwarding machine.
    This then has nothing to do with your router; you just need the appropriate
    forwarding software for the machine that receives the incoming requests
    from the router. That would be a proxy server.

    Gerhard

  5. Re: (Yet another) Newbie question

    Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
    > On 2008-04-20 19:25:03, Marten Kemp wrote:
    >
    >>> I'm not quite sure what you want to do, but if you want to access a
    >>> machine behind your router from the outside, you have to set up some
    >>> kind of port forwarding. You could for example forward port 88 on the
    >>> router to port 80 on 192.168.2.102. Then you access your production
    >>> server when going to port 80 on your public IP, and your test server
    >>> when going to port 88 on your public IP.

    >> I guess I'm unclear about how routing really works. I was thinking that
    >> I could set something up to pass some port 80 traffic from one server to
    >> another within the internal network.

    >
    > In a way, it can be looked at quite simply: Incoming traffic has a
    > destination address and a destination port. The destination address is your
    > public IP, which gets translated into a local destination address by the
    > router (NAT).
    >
    > You use the destination port to determine in the router to which local
    > destination IP address to route this packet. You generally cannot route
    > some port 80 traffic to one address and some of it to another IP address --
    > what would be the criterion where to route it to?
    >
    > You can of course change the routing table, and have the traffic forwarded
    > to one IP address during some periods and to a different one during others.
    > Some routers have built-in scheduling facilities for this.
    >
    > You also can forward requests on the machine itself to another machine,
    > having the appropriate piece of software running on the forwarding machine.
    > This then has nothing to do with your router; you just need the appropriate
    > forwarding software for the machine that receives the incoming requests
    > from the router. That would be a proxy server.


    AHA! _That's_ the point I was missing. Thanks.

    --
    -- Marten Kemp
    (Fix name and ISP to reply)

+ Reply to Thread