Linux as Proxy Server - Redhat

This is a discussion on Linux as Proxy Server - Redhat ; I have 3 computers at home one with CentOS , a laptop with windows vista and a laptop with windows XP. I have a Wireless router connected to a DSL router for internet access. All 3 computers are connected to ...

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Thread: Linux as Proxy Server

  1. Linux as Proxy Server

    I have 3 computers at home one with CentOS , a laptop with windows
    vista and a laptop with windows XP. I have a Wireless router connected
    to a DSL router for internet access. All 3 computers are connected to
    the wireless router and all of them are using internet just fine. For
    self-educational reasons I would like to configure the two laptops to
    access internet via the Linux Box.
    So I have a couple of questions:

    1.Should I use some kind of HTTP proxy on the Linux Box?
    2.If the answer to the previous question is yeas them what proxy will
    be a good and easy to configure choice?
    3.Is there any feature on Linux that don’t require additional software
    in order to use it as “internet gateway”?
    4.What should I gain by using Linux as proxy on small companies
    instead of just using the physical router?
    5.In the configuration that I am using right now should I say that I
    am using the router as a proxy server?
    6.Is there any real difference between router and a software proxy?
    (beside the obvious ones like the router is a physical device)
    7.Do I need to have more than one Network Card installed on the Linux
    Box in order to use it as a Proxy Server?
    8.Any important differences between “gateway”, “proxy” or “NAT
    Server”?
    Thanks in advance


  2. Re: Linux as Proxy Server

    Artificer wrote:
    > I have 3 computers at home one with CentOS , a laptop with windows
    > vista and a laptop with windows XP. I have a Wireless router connected
    > to a DSL router for internet access. All 3 computers are connected to
    > the wireless router and all of them are using internet just fine. For
    > self-educational reasons I would like to configure the two laptops to
    > access internet via the Linux Box.
    > So I have a couple of questions:
    >
    > 1.Should I use some kind of HTTP proxy on the Linux Box?
    > 2.If the answer to the previous question is yeas them what proxy will
    > be a good and easy to configure choice?
    > 3.Is there any feature on Linux that don’t require additional software
    > in order to use it as “internet gateway”?
    > 4.What should I gain by using Linux as proxy on small companies
    > instead of just using the physical router?
    > 5.In the configuration that I am using right now should I say that I
    > am using the router as a proxy server?
    > 6.Is there any real difference between router and a software proxy?
    > (beside the obvious ones like the router is a physical device)
    > 7.Do I need to have more than one Network Card installed on the Linux
    > Box in order to use it as a Proxy Server?
    > 8.Any important differences between “gateway”, “proxy” or “NAT
    > Server”?
    > Thanks in advance
    >


    I would go for the linux firewall script. That easily be found by Google.

    It only requires to network devices on your linux box. So the machine
    needs either 2 networkcards or a dual networkcard.

    Also for best functionality split your network in two different ip-ranges.

    Wireless router and Linux box eth0 first ip-range.

    Linux box eth1 and laptops in second ip-range.

    Be aware that the second ip-range might need a physical switch or hub to
    avoid direct internet access.


    ad 1. No need for webaccess, can be needed for a "web nany".

    ad 2. If you still wish to do so, squid is a Linux Proxy application.

    ad 3. Iptables needs to installed, it is on your RHEL or Centos install
    media. Linux firewall script is a configuration script for
    iptables.

    ad 4. Depends on the requirements: a router only blocks ip-ports, it
    does not block web content

    ad 5. probably not, standard routers are no "web nanies".

    ad 6. proxies can be configured as "simple web nannies"

    ad 7. not necessary, for a Linux router it is the easiest setup.

    ad 8. yes, to many to mention. The OSI networkmodel should be studied.
    A gateway is a 7 layer translation, a proxy is an application, and
    a NAT server does not fit in OSI (it is a tcp/ip device).

    Kind regards,


    Jan Gerrit

  3. Re: Linux as Proxy Server

    On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 08:39:52 -0700, Artificer wrote:

    > 1.Should I use some kind of HTTP proxy on the Linux Box?


    You can. It speeds up browsing significantly.

    > 2.If the answer
    > to the previous question is yeas them what proxy will be a good and easy
    > to configure choice?


    Best proxy for linux is squid - hands down. There is an RPM for it as
    well. Or - you can use Endian Firewall which comes with a complete squid
    implementation out of the box - with a simple web GUI management frontend.

    > 4.What should I gain by using Linux as proxy on small companies instead

    of just using the physical router?

    A proxy and a router are two completely different things. A router
    routes IP traffic on a network. A proxy is a centralized point on your
    network for making all of your outbound http/https/ftp/gopher/etc
    connections, and generally caches all of that data to lighten the load on
    your Internet uplink. It's also useful for tracking the browsing of your
    users.

    > 5.In the configuration that I am using right
    > now should I say that I am using the router as a proxy server?


    Nope. You're using it as a router.

    > 6.Is there any real difference between router and a software proxy?


    Like the difference between a turtle and a ham sandwich.

    > 7.Do I need to have more than one Network Card installed on the Linux
    > Box in order to use it as a Proxy Server?


    No. However, if you're also going to use it as your Internet gateway -
    then yes, you'll need two NICs.

    > 8.Any important differences between “gateway”,
    > “proxy” or “NAT Server”?


    Again, these are all very different things. There isn't such a thing as
    a "NAT server", however. You may be thinking of a NAT router.

    NAT: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network...ss_translation
    Proxy server: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Http_proxy
    Gateway: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gateway...communications)

    Hope that helps.



  4. Re: Linux as Proxy Server

    On Aug 31, 12:28*pm, Mike Bleiweiss wrote:
    > On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 08:39:52 -0700, Artificer wrote:
    > > 1.Should I use some kind of HTTP proxy on the Linux Box?

    >
    > You can. *It speeds up browsing significantly.
    >
    > > 2.If the answer
    > > to the previous question is yeas them what proxy will be a good and easy
    > > to configure choice?

    >
    > Best proxy for linux is squid - hands down. *There is an RPM for it as
    > well. *Or - you can use Endian Firewall which comes with a complete squid
    > implementation out of the box - with a simple web GUI management frontend..
    >
    > > 4.What should I gain by using Linux as proxy on small companies instead

    >
    > of just using the physical router?
    >
    > A proxy and a router are two completely different things. *A router
    > routes IP traffic on a network. *A proxy is a centralized point on your
    > network for making all of your outbound http/https/ftp/gopher/etc
    > connections, and generally caches all of that data to lighten the load on
    > your Internet uplink. *It's also useful for tracking the browsing of your
    > users.
    >
    > > 5.In the configuration that I am using right
    > > now should I say that I am using the router as a proxy server?

    >
    > Nope. *You're using it as a router.
    >
    > > 6.Is there any real difference between router and a software proxy?

    >
    > Like the difference between a turtle and a ham sandwich.
    >
    > > 7.Do I need to *have more than one Network Card installed on the Linux
    > > Box in order to use it as a Proxy Server?

    >
    > No. *However, if you're also going to use it as your Internet gateway -
    > then yes, you'll need two NICs.
    >
    > > 8.Any important differences between “gateway”,
    > > “proxy” or “NAT Server”?

    >
    > Again, these are all very different things. *There isn't such a thing as
    > a "NAT server", however. *You may be thinking of a NAT router.
    >
    > NAT:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network...ss_translation
    > Proxy server:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Http_proxy
    > Gateway:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gateway...communications)
    >
    > Hope that helps.


    Thanks a lot!

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