CentOS vs Fedora - Redhat

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Thread: CentOS vs Fedora

  1. CentOS vs Fedora

    Is there any feature in CentOS missing in fedora?

  2. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    On 08/12/2008 10:11 PM, Artificer sent:
    > Is there any feature in CentOS missing in fedora?


    Hello:

    The latest CentOS is 5.2 and was derived from Fedora's FC6.

    The latest Fedora is F9. CentOS (RHEL) is supposed to exude stability,
    and is the basis for many mission critical server farms in commerce.
    The latest CentOS normally has a 2.6.18 kernel and a gcc 4.1.2

    The latest Fedora is leading edge. F9 probably wouldn't be your first
    choice in a business roll, but normally has a 2.6.25 kernel and a gcc
    4.3

    I believe shipping manifests are now available for both.

    Best wishes to you.

    --
    1PW

    @?6A62?FEH9E=6o2@=]4@> [r4o7t]

  3. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 22:11:49 -0700, Artificer wrote:

    > Is there any feature in CentOS missing in fedora?


    Motif. Fedora replaced Motif with Lesstif which is incompatible with a
    lot of Motif based applications.

    In general there are a lot more programs included in Fedora then in CentOS
    but CentOS has better compatibility with commercial applications. Fedora
    also had much better hardware compatibility then CentOS because Fedora
    uses the current kernel and CentOS uses an antique kernel. I run a CentOS
    5.2 VM on top of Fedora when I need to run an application that won't run
    on Fedora.

  4. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 06:43:27 -0500, General Schvantzkopf
    wrote:
    > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 22:11:49 -0700, Artificer wrote:


    >> Is there any feature in CentOS missing in fedora?


    > Motif. Fedora replaced Motif with Lesstif which is incompatible with a
    > lot of Motif based applications.


    > In general there are a lot more programs included in Fedora then in CentOS
    > but CentOS has better compatibility with commercial applications. Fedora
    > also had much better hardware compatibility then CentOS because Fedora
    > uses the current kernel and CentOS uses an antique kernel. I run a CentOS
    > 5.2 VM on top of Fedora when I need to run an application that won't run
    > on Fedora.


    Most programs available for Fedora are also available for CentOS through
    CentOS Extras, CentOS Plus, Dag Wieer's or other repositories. Just depends
    on how far you want to get from "pure" CentOS. And of course, you may not
    be able to get the latest versions as in Fedora 9.

    The kernel is 2.6.18 in CentOS 5, and will stay there through 2014 when
    support ends. However, when kernel updates are available, while the kernel
    version stays at 2.6.18, the latest drivers are included, a-la backport. So
    hardware comaptibily is no problem.

    In general, if you want the latest and greatest and don't mind the risks and
    reinstall every now and then Fedora would ge the choice. If you want a
    super-stable system you can run for years with reinstalling go with CentOS.

    My header tells you which I choose...
    --
    Registered Linux user #266531

  5. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 02:44:17 +0000, Crashdamage wrote:

    > On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 06:43:27 -0500, General Schvantzkopf
    > wrote:
    >> On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 22:11:49 -0700, Artificer wrote:

    >
    >>> Is there any feature in CentOS missing in fedora?

    >
    >> Motif. Fedora replaced Motif with Lesstif which is incompatible with a
    >> lot of Motif based applications.

    >
    >> In general there are a lot more programs included in Fedora then in
    >> CentOS but CentOS has better compatibility with commercial
    >> applications. Fedora also had much better hardware compatibility then
    >> CentOS because Fedora uses the current kernel and CentOS uses an
    >> antique kernel. I run a CentOS 5.2 VM on top of Fedora when I need to
    >> run an application that won't run on Fedora.

    >
    > Most programs available for Fedora are also available for CentOS through
    > CentOS Extras, CentOS Plus, Dag Wieer's or other repositories. Just
    > depends on how far you want to get from "pure" CentOS. And of course,
    > you may not be able to get the latest versions as in Fedora 9.
    >
    > The kernel is 2.6.18 in CentOS 5, and will stay there through 2014 when
    > support ends. However, when kernel updates are available, while the
    > kernel version stays at 2.6.18, the latest drivers are included, a-la
    > backport. So hardware comaptibily is no problem.


    This is simply untrue, Redhat backports a very limited set of drivers for
    server class systems. They don't bother backporting drivers for desktop
    hardware. For example the drivers for the Realtek RTL8111/8168B MACs have
    been in the kernel since 2.6.19 but they aren't in the current CentOS 5.2
    kernel. If you are using a desktop or laptop class machine you can forget
    about using CentOS with it's standard kernel. You can use it if you put
    your own kernel on it but there is a limit to that. I have a 2.6.24.x
    kernel on my Core2 box that has the Realtek MACs. However I haven't been
    able to get a later kernel to work, the 2.6.25 and 2.6.26 kernels panic
    if you put them on a CentOS 5.2 system. As I said earlier my solution is
    to use Fedora as the host OS and then to us VMware to run a CentOS5.2 VM
    on top. Most applications will run on native Fedora but for those that
    don't the CentOS VM does the trick.

  6. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    1PW wrote:
    > On 08/12/2008 10:11 PM, Artificer sent:
    >> Is there any feature in CentOS missing in fedora?

    >
    > Hello:
    >
    > The latest CentOS is 5.2 and was derived from Fedora's FC6.
    >
    > The latest Fedora is F9. CentOS (RHEL) is supposed to exude stability,
    > and is the basis for many mission critical server farms in commerce.
    > The latest CentOS normally has a 2.6.18 kernel and a gcc 4.1.2
    >
    > The latest Fedora is leading edge. F9 probably wouldn't be your first
    > choice in a business roll, but normally has a 2.6.25 kernel and a gcc
    > 4.3
    >
    > I believe shipping manifests are now available for both.
    >
    > Best wishes to you.
    >


    No, it was derived from RHEL 5.2. RHEL and Fedora have.... fascinating
    relationships, but are not one-for-one identical by any means.

  7. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    On 08/14/2008 05:00 PM, Nico Kadel-Garcia sent:

    Snip, snip...

    Hello Nico:

    > No, it was derived from RHEL 5.2.


    Once again, I have brought great shame to the family name. :-(

    RHEL and Fedora have.... fascinating
    > relationships, but are not one-for-one identical by any means.


    We agree.

    I should have said: the roots of RHEL 5 are based on Fedora's FC6.

    The roots of CentOS 5, are to be found in RHEL 5.

    I just checked my own RHEL5.2 system and still find about 100 files,
    whose identities contain "fc6" embedded in their RPM filenames.

    Thank you for correcting my poorly crafted statement.

    --
    1PW

    @?6A62?FEH9E=6o2@=]4@> [r4o7t]

  8. Re: CentOS vs Fedora

    1PW wrote:
    > On 08/14/2008 05:00 PM, Nico Kadel-Garcia sent:
    >
    > Snip, snip...
    >
    > Hello Nico:
    >
    >> No, it was derived from RHEL 5.2.

    >
    > Once again, I have brought great shame to the family name. :-(
    >
    > RHEL and Fedora have.... fascinating
    >> relationships, but are not one-for-one identical by any means.

    >
    > We agree.
    >
    > I should have said: the roots of RHEL 5 are based on Fedora's FC6.
    >
    > The roots of CentOS 5, are to be found in RHEL 5.
    >
    > I just checked my own RHEL5.2 system and still find about 100 files,
    > whose identities contain "fc6" embedded in their RPM filenames.
    >
    > Thank you for correcting my poorly crafted statement.
    >


    No sweat. This happens wherever an RPM gets built from an SRPM with a
    hardcoded 'fc6' in it, rather than using a '%(?dist)' to look in the local RPM
    setup and set a more appropriate tag, such as '.el5' from RedHat or '.c5' from
    CentOS.

    Many components are similar if not identical to a previous Fedora release at
    the time of a RHEL release: it gives time to really test the whole system as a
    unit, rather than being on the leading edge and having components interact poorly.

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