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  1. C++

    I would like to learn C++ programing under Linux. Does Linux use a
    flavor of C++ which is different from like Borlands? I have a book on
    Borlands C++ but the programs don't seem to work. What is a good book
    to get for a newbie?

  2. Re: C++

    Bill Hennessy wrote in message news:<40ae7157$0$8560$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com>...
    > I would like to learn C++ programing under Linux. Does Linux use a
    > flavor of C++ which is different from like Borlands? I have a book on
    > Borlands C++ but the programs don't seem to work. What is a good book
    > to get for a newbie?


    As a general rule try to avoid proprietary C++ "systems" and
    "programming environments" as in "So-and-so C++". These all look very
    pretty but are redundant and of restricted generality as (by
    definition) they cannot do anything besides what their designer had in
    mind. The standard UNIX/Linux/etc. approach is to provide instead a
    set of very well-tuned specialized tools that can be made to fit
    together, frequently in unpredictable ways - that's the key.

    Andrew Koenig and Barbara Moo wrote a good book: "Accelerated C++". It
    introduces the concepts in the right places, templates for example
    show up very early on. Also pick up a good Linux introduction book
    explaining those standard tools I mentioned above (the C++ compiler,
    gmake, the editors, etc.)

    Jan Bielawski

  3. Re: C++

    On Fri, 21 May 2004 16:14:57 -0500, Bill Hennessy wrote:

    > I would like to learn C++ programing under Linux. Does Linux use a flavor
    > of C++ which is different from like Borlands? I have a book on Borlands
    > C++ but the programs don't seem to work. What is a good book to get for a
    > newbie?


    For a compiler, look at:

    http://gcc.gnu.org/

    For common tools, look at:

    www.gnu.org
    www.freshmeat.net
    www.sourceforge.net

    For learning, amazon.com is your best bet, whether you are looking to buy
    or just to find good titles to search your local library for. Taken with
    the standard grain of salt, the reviews available on amazon.com generally
    indicate which books tend to rise above the rest. Additionaly, for each
    book, they list other titles on the same subject. It can be a handy
    reference when looking for books. Also, amazon.com has this listmania
    thing where people can create lists for subjects of interest. Those can
    also help in finding good books to get you started.

    I'd give a list of what I own, but they are all boxed up at the moment as
    I am moving, and I don't have a good memory of the titles and authors to
    give you even a guess.

    There's also the standard "google it" response too, I suppose. Sure you
    could find book lists for linux programming and c++ programming.

    Sure you could also find tutorials for c++ as well as linux programming as
    well on the net.

    For specific questions, google groups can also be of great value. There
    are some great c++ and linux programming netnews groups available. These
    are generally good resources when specific questions are at hand.

    I hope this helps,

    Jason


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