booting to single user - Redhat

This is a discussion on booting to single user - Redhat ; Hello all - I edited the /etc/passwd file for root from bash to ksh and now can't log into the machine. How can I boot into single user mode to edit /etc/passwd for root back to bash? Appreciate your help....

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Thread: booting to single user

  1. booting to single user

    Hello all -
    I edited the /etc/passwd file for root from bash to ksh and now can't
    log into the machine. How can I boot into single user mode to edit
    /etc/passwd for root back to bash? Appreciate your help.

  2. Re: booting to single user

    On 18 May 2004 11:13:51 -0700, Long wrote:
    > Hello all -
    > I edited the /etc/passwd file for root from bash to ksh and now can't
    > log into the machine. How can I boot into single user mode to edit
    > /etc/passwd for root back to bash? Appreciate your help.


    I would boot the cd in the rescue mode and make the change.

  3. Re: booting to single user

    On Tue, 18 May 2004 18:28:22 GMT, Bit Twister
    wrote:

    >On 18 May 2004 11:13:51 -0700, Long wrote:
    >> Hello all -
    >> I edited the /etc/passwd file for root from bash to ksh and now can't
    >> log into the machine. How can I boot into single user mode to edit
    >> /etc/passwd for root back to bash? Appreciate your help.

    >
    >I would boot the cd in the rescue mode and make the change.



    Assuming you can login as a regular user, then the easiest method
    would be to use 'su'. For example:

    su --shell=/bin/bash -

    -Chris

  4. Re: booting to single user

    Long wrote:

    > I edited the /etc/passwd file for root from bash to ksh and now can't
    > log into the machine. How can I boot into single user mode to edit
    > /etc/passwd for root back to bash?


    Changing root's shell from bash to ksh should not cause these problems
    normally. I do this all over the place, actually.

    However, there are always caveats. First, make sure that all dynamic
    libraries are on / if you are using a dynamically linked executable.
    The usual culprit is libraries in /usr/lib, and /usr not being mounted
    at boot.

    Secondly, make sure that the shell is in /etc/shells.

    I normally install pdksh and convert all users to /bin/ksh, and usually
    root as well.

    To be extra careful, you might wish to make /bin/ksh a static
    executable, but that would require compiling it from scratch probably.

    Also remember to edit your password file by using vipw - or better yet,
    log in as root and use chsh to change your shell.

    Also, when making such a change, leave a root shell active and test the
    login from somewhere else (like another terminal). This would help you
    to avoid such troubles.

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