Java on Linux - Redhat

This is a discussion on Java on Linux - Redhat ; I recently installed Redhat Linux 9 on my previously XP box and now im trying to run some java applications and it won't let me. Everytime I run something that is java, it says that it needs "Application/x-java-vm". I went ...

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Thread: Java on Linux

  1. Java on Linux

    I recently installed Redhat Linux 9 on my previously XP box and now im
    trying to run some java applications and it won't let me. Everytime I
    run something that is java, it says that it needs
    "Application/x-java-vm". I went to Java's site and i downloaded and
    installed Java. I went to the Java settings and it is enabled, but it
    does not work. In the Mozilla settings, Java is enabled. I don't see
    why it doesn't work.

    Why doesn't it work?


    -DJ V

  2. Re: Java on Linux

    DJ V wrote:
    > Why doesn't it work?


    Is there a symlink in either /usr/lib/mozilla*/plugins or
    ~/.mozilla/plugins to the Java plugin shared object? Do a:

    $ locate libjavaplugin

    That finds the necessary file for my system and the version
    of Java J2RE that I installed some time ago.

    If you make a symlink in /usr/lib/mozilla*/plugins (there
    may be a mozilla version tacked on to the end of "mozilla"
    in that path, that's why I used an '*') then all userids
    will be able to access Java. If you make the symlink in
    ~/.mozilla/plugins then only the userid associated with that
    home directory will be able to access Java.


  3. Re: Java on Linux


    "DJ V" wrote in message
    news:e656619d.0405172356.3699652b@posting.google.c om...
    > I recently installed Redhat Linux 9 on my previously XP box and now im
    > trying to run some java applications and it won't let me. Everytime I
    > run something that is java, it says that it needs
    > "Application/x-java-vm". I went to Java's site and i downloaded and
    > installed Java. I went to the Java settings and it is enabled, but it
    > does not work. In the Mozilla settings, Java is enabled. I don't see
    > why it doesn't work.
    >
    > Why doesn't it work?


    Many, many reasons

    I am one of those who was never able to get the java plugin to work
    w/mozilla under RH9. However, install firefox, and download the java plugin
    for firefox, and it works fine on RH9. you can give that a spin if you want.



  4. Re: Java on Linux

    Thanks a lot, man. It worked!

  5. Re: Java on Linux

    > I am one of those who was never able to get the java plugin to work
    > w/mozilla under RH9. However, install firefox, and download the java plugin
    > for firefox, and it works fine on RH9. you can give that a spin if you want.


    I use firefox on my Windows XP and it works great! but i managed to
    get the java to work here by doing the following, which i got from
    another Google Groups thing...:

    From: Eratosthenes (eddie360@xshentel.net)
    Subject: Java Success (with directions for other newbies)
    This is the only article in this thread
    View: Original Format
    Newsgroups: alt.os.linux.mandrake
    Date: 2002-10-16 19:06:01 PST

    I hope this isn't considered a waste of bandwith. But I am happy to
    say that
    I have gotten my browsers to work with Java. Trivial for a non-newby,
    but
    one giant leap for me.

    I downloaded j2re-1_4_0_02-linux-i586-rpm.bin from...
    http://java.sun.com/j2se

    Installation instructions are included on the Sun site. But, unless I
    am
    mistaken, they did not include instructions on how to make the all
    important symbolic link. I read other posts in here dealing with the
    issue.
    And found a page on the web that dealt with using Java with Slackware
    here...

    http://www.computerage.net/wflug/mod...article&sid=27

    (I wouldn't follow the directions from this page byte for byte, it
    just an
    example)

    First I opened up a super user terminal and signed in as root. I
    opened up
    the Konquerer file browser and drilled down through this directory...

    /usr/java/j2re1.4.0_02/plugin/i386/ns610

    This directory and the files therein should have been created by
    installing
    the downloaded RPM. There is one file in ../ns610 named
    "libjavaplugin_oji.so". A symbolic link to this file must be made in
    the
    /use/lib/mozilla-1.1/plugins directory in order for any of your
    Mozilla
    based browsers to use the Java plug-in. Opening up a Konqueror file
    browser
    and drilling down to this file, allows you to copy and paste the path
    name
    from the location bar. You'll see why.

    To create the required symbolic link in the
    /use/lib/mozilla-1.1/plugins
    directory you must first make this your working directory bye
    typeing...

    cd /usr/lib/mozilla-1.1/plugins

    CD is the command to change the directory while in a terminal, just
    like the
    MS-DOS command. Now that you are in the directory where you need to
    place
    your sym link, you can copy the full path name from the location bar
    of the
    Konqueror window you used to drill down to the ../610 folder. And
    paste it
    after the "ln -s" command in your terminal window. And then copy the
    name
    of the file libjavaplugin_oji.so, that is in the ../ns610 folder at
    the
    end. So you should have something that look like this un your
    terminal...
    I imagine there are other ways to do this.
    ln -s /usr/java/j2re1.4.0_02/plugin/i386/ns610/libjavaplugin_oji.so

    You can type the whole thing if you want, but working simaltaneously
    in the
    graphical environment while having a shell open allows you to copy and
    paste to the shell and eliminate typos. To copy file names you can
    right
    click on the file while in Konqueror. The file name will be
    highlighted,
    and waiting to be edited. Now you can right click on the file name and
    choose copy.

    If you are using an older version of Mandrake, a different version of
    Mozilla, or you have a different version of the Java plug-in, there
    will be
    subtle differences in what you need to type. Opening up a graphical
    file
    browser like Konqueror, will allow you to easily examine the files and
    determine if there is anything different.

    Eddie

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